:: The 4th Era ::
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:: The 4th Era ::
Exploration of the new era in human history marked by invention of the Internet
Curated by Jim Lerman
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3 Tools To Discover Great Relevant Content for Your Niche Audience

3 Tools To Discover Great Relevant Content for Your Niche Audience | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Content curation: tools to help you find and share great content from other people alongside your own content.

Via Robin Good, Giuseppe Mauriello
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, July 1, 2013 2:25 PM

Tools highlighted include Scoop.it, Newsle and Feedly.

AraujoFredy's curator insight, July 2, 2013 10:32 AM
Cómo encontrar contenido relevante para su audiencia de nichoDesde www.socialmediaexaminer.com - 1 de julio de 13:55
Curaduría de contenidos: herramientas para ayudarle a encontrar y compartir un gran contenido de otras personas junto con su propio contenido.
Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, September 7, 2014 12:16 AM

Some good informaion

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AOL Reader Hands-on: New Solid Google Reader Replacement To Rival Feedly

AOL Reader Hands-on: New Solid Google Reader Replacement To Rival Feedly | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Excerpted from review article by The Next Web:
"Pitching with the slogan “all your favorite websites, in one place,” AOL’s Reader came as a surprise to us at first, but when you consider AOL’s history, much of it involved surfacing, creating and managing content. In fact, AOL’s content play, like Yahoo, is one of its strongest efforts, which is why this release isn’t that much of a stretch after all.

The design of AOL Reader won’t sweep you off your feet. The service features much of what you’d expect, and little more.

The service is entirely Web-based, but offers an optimized, touch-friendly design for mobile users. To sign up, use your AOL account (if you still have one); but you can also join via Twitter, Facebook or Google accounts, which is handy.

On first login, AOL Reader prompts you to add new subscriptions, and you have three ways to do so: import your feeds from another service (including Google Reader), add them manually, or browse through categories of sites suggested by AOL.

A number of different layouts are available, making AOL’s Reader a rather flexible solution.Additional features in AOL’s Reader include sharing to social networks, “simple tagging and organization capabilities,” read it later-style article saving, and an API which lets developers build third-party apps atop the service. Clearly, AOL is looking to rebuild the sort of ecosystem that Google decided to demolish..."

Read full original article by The Next Web:
http://thenextweb.com/insider/2013/06/24/aol-reader/

Try out it: http://reader.aol.com

 


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Vmk Roy's comment, June 30, 2013 11:37 AM
http://www.livetvchannelsz.com/
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Advances in Technology Enhanced Learning | Free eBook

Advances in Technology Enhanced Learning | Free eBook | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

by Fridolin Wild, Paul Lefrere & Peter Scott

Description from website

 

‘Advances in Technology Enhanced Learning’ presents a range of research projects which aim to explore how to make engagement in learning (and teaching) more passionate. This interactive and experimental resource discusses innovations which pave the way to open collaboration at scale. The book introduces methodological and technological breakthroughs via twelve chapters to learners, instructors, and decision-makers in schools, universities, and workplaces.

"The Open University's Knowledge Media Institute and the EU TELMap project have brought together the luminaries from the European research area to showcase their vision of the future of learning with technology via their recent research project work. The projects discussed range widely over the Technology Enhanced Learning area from: environments for responsive open learning, work-based reflection, work-based social creativity, serious games and many more."

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Jaron Lanier: The Internet destroyed the middle class | Salon

Jaron Lanier: The Internet destroyed the middle class | Salon | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

by Scott Timberg

 

"Jaron Lanier is a computer science pioneer who has grown gradually disenchanted with the online world since his early days popularizing the idea of virtual reality. “Lanier is often described as ‘visionary,’ ” Jennifer Kahn wrote in a 2011 New Yorker profile, “a word that manages to convey both a capacity for mercurial insight and a lack of practical job skills.”

 

"Raised mostly in Texas and New Mexico by bohemian parents who’d escaped anti-Semitic violence in Europe, he’s been a young disciple of Richard Feynman, an employee at Atari, a scholar at Columbia, a visiting artist at New York University, and a columnist for Discover magazine. He’s also a longtime composer and musician, and a collector of antique and archaic instruments, many of them Asian.

 

"His book continues his war on digital utopianism and his assertion of humanist and individualistic values in a hive-mind world. But Lanier still sees potential in digital technology: He just wants it reoriented away from its main role so far, which involves “spying” on citizens, creating a winner-take-all society, eroding professions and, in exchange, throwing bonbons to the crowd.

T

"his week sees the publication of “Who Owns the Future?,” which digs into technology, economics and culture in unconventional ways. (How is a pirated music file like a 21st century mortgage?) Lanier argues that there is little essential difference between Facebook and a digital trading company, or Amazon and an enormous bank. (“Stanford sometimes seems like one of the Silicon Valley companies.”)

 

"Much of the book looks at the way Internet technology threatens to destroy the middle class by first eroding employment and job security, along with various “levees” that give the economic middle stability."

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Scoop.it Pros: Laura Brown on curation and the display of information

Scoop.it Pros: Laura Brown on curation and the display of information | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

by Laura Brown

 

"Being a content curator is all about displaying information. We don’t create the content, we display it. We share it – and people read it. But, first you have to display it. There are several skills involved in displaying content. Here are some thoughts for you to consider when creating and curating a Scoop.it topic."

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Facilitating Online | Centre for Educational Technology

Facilitating Online | Centre for Educational Technology | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Facilitating Online is a course intended for training educators as online facilitators of fully online and mixed mode courses. The Centre for Educational Technology (CET) produced a Course Leader’s Guide as an Open Educational Resource to assist educators and trainers who wish to implement a course on online facilitation within their institution or across several institutions. The course manual was written by Tony Carr, Shaheeda Jaffer and Jeanne Smuts and was published online and in print in early 2009.

The guide contains the course model, week-by-week learning activities, general guidance to the course leader on how to implement and customise the course and specific guidelines on each learning activity. The latest version of the course manual includes several minor corrections and is dedicated to the memory of our co-author Jeanne Smuts who died on 28th July 2009.

See Facilitating Online: A guide for course leaders for the latest pdf version of the course manual

http://www.cet.uct.ac.za/files/file/FacilitationOnlineWeb.pdf

as well the specimen course site.

https://vula.uct.ac.za/portal/site/1d19c50c-0963-4b1d-bdc7-73ca46a72dd1

The book is also available in print form at no charge. To request copies of the printed book please contact Shirley Rix at

shirley.rix@uct.ac.za.


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Heiko Idensen's curator insight, March 23, 2013 4:50 AM

.. see all the course Material in the library of the online course:

https://vula.uct.ac.za/portal/site/1d19c50c-0963-4b1d-bdc7-73ca46a72dd1/page/9f6afd6b-277a-45fa-82d2-f02d126ccc0b

...

-- or the PDF-File:
http://www.cet.uct.ac.za/files/file/FacilitationOnlineWeb.pdf

...

Contents
List of tables and figures iii
Acknowledgements iv
Introduction 1
Why do we need an online facilitation course? 1
About this guide 1
Section 1. About the course 3
Purpose of the course 3
Course principles 3
Capabilities of online facilitators 4
Course model 4
Course outcomes 6
Specific outcomes 6
Section 2. Advice to participants 7
Requirements of the course 7
Preparing to arrive (Week 0) 8
Section 3. Week-by-week activities 9
Week 1 Arriving 9
Week 2 Conversing 13
Week 3 Facilitating 17
Week 4 Creating 20
Week 5 Applying 23
Section 4. Preparing to run the course 27
Skills needed to run this course 27
Selecting your team 27
Recruiting participants 27
Technology requirements 28
Customising course materials 28
Setting up your online environment 28
Section 5. Implementing the course 31
Week 0 31
During the course 31
Ending the course 34
After the course 34
Section 6. Week-by-week guidance 35
Week 1 Arriving 35
Week 2 Conversing 47
Week 3 Facilitating 57
Week 4 Creating 64
Week 5 Applying 72
Appendices 83
Appendix 1 Opening survey 83
Appendix 2 Online facilitation course model 86
Appendix 3 Capabilities of online facilitators 87
Appendix 4 Course purpose 89
Appendix 5 Course principles 89
Appendix 6 Creating effective summaries 90
Appendix 7 Do’s and don’ts of online facilitation 92
Appendix 8 Why diversity matters 94
Appendix 9 Non-violent communication 96
Appendix 10 Activity design template 99
Appendix 11 Personal development template 100
Appendix 12 Evaluating the course 102
Appendix 13 Recommended readings 104
Appendix 14 Free software 105
Appendix 15 Announcements and updates 106

Kathleen Gradel's curator insight, July 21, 2013 12:14 PM

Check out this solid resource :)

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125+ Articles on Games and Learning | Spotlight on Digital Media and Learning

125+ Articles on Games and Learning | Spotlight on Digital Media and Learning | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

A sprightly collection of over 125 articles on Games and Learning, from as early as today to going back to 2006. Features pieces by and about many leaders such as Constance Steinkeuhler, Drew Davidson, James Gee, Katie Salen, John Seely Brown, Mimi Ito, Cathy Davidson, dana boyd, and many others. This great publication will cease to produce new work sometime in late 2013 and begin to put out a new publication shortly thereafter.

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Joe Pereira's curator insight, June 30, 2013 7:31 PM

An incredible resource with articles from the top names in DGBL.

Pini Tal's curator insight, July 1, 2013 4:05 PM

125+ Articles on Games and Learning

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Ten mostly offbeat ways teens can learn something this summer | Washington Post

Ten mostly offbeat ways teens can learn something this summer | Washington Post | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

by Roger Schank via Valerie Strauss

 

"Every day, high school students get to my blog, Education Outrage, by typing “high school is useless” or something similar. I worry about those kids, but I also worry about the kids who think high school is very important, who study all the time, and who obsess about getting into a “good college.”

The good news is that it is summertime. Now you can forget about school and actually learn something. The teacher is you. (Your teacher will really always be you. If others in your life can help, great, but it will still be you in the end.)

 

"So what should you do this summer? Here are 10 suggestions:"

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Apple pushes hard for education market with iOS 7 improvements | TheNextWeb

Apple pushes hard for education market with iOS 7 improvements | TheNextWeb | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

by Kaylene Hong

Summary by Education Dive

 

"Apple is furthering its education push with iOS 7 for the iPhone and iPad, adding several new features the company says “make it easier for institutions to put devices in the hands of students.

 

”Through the new app store's Volume Purchase Program, institutions can buy app licenses and use mobile device management software to push those licenses through to students, faculty and staff, and Apple will also provide a way for schools to obtain verifiable parental consent for personal Apple IDs belonging to students under the age of 13.

 

"Also among key features, VPP will now support Mac apps and books, MDMprotocol gives teachers control to lock iOS devices into a specific app and manage apps wirelessly, and Apple TV can be enrolled in MDM, allowing students and teachers to mirror a device's screen on a specific big screen with greater ease."

 

[Editor's note: Apple has set up an iOS 7 Education page detailing the OS upgrade's relevant features.]

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Video ANT - Annotating Videos

Video ANT - Annotating Videos | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Via Nik Peachey, antonella burgio
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EnglishWizards's curator insight, June 19, 2013 7:45 PM

Look forward to working out how to make use of this tool. 

Julia Johnson's curator insight, June 24, 2013 8:10 PM

Annotate (youtube) videos

R.Conrath, Ed.D.'s curator insight, June 30, 2013 8:51 AM

Annotate your videos.

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VEJ June 2013

This June 2013 issue of the Virtual Education Journal features articles on Digital Storytelling and announces the 2013 VEJ Reader's Choice Awards. Prepare to devour every morsel and VEJ - Out Of This World!

Via Lisa Durff
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Arts stimulation a lesson in good literacy

Arts stimulation a lesson in good literacy | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Andrew Taylor

Summary by ASCD WorldWide Edition SmartBrief

 

"Australia's school education minister, Peter Garrett, has launched an online resource intended to help teachers better integrate the arts into classroom lessons. Advocates say the ARTS:LIVE programme, designed to help raise student achievement, is necessary because the country does not have enough specialist music and art teachers. "The evidence here and in other countries is this unrelenting pursuit of improving literacy and numeracy scores just through testing and focusing on that aspect of the curriculum to the detriment of the arts has not worked," professor Brian Caldwell said"

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From Creating To Sense-Making: That's What Curation Is All About


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Freddy Monteiro's curator insight, June 23, 2013 8:01 AM

Will content curation shape the way we rank scientific journals/articles?

Stephen Dale's curator insight, June 26, 2013 7:26 AM

With almost anyone now able to generate and publish content, finding relevance (signal to noise) is precoccupying knowledge workers everywhere. Sense-making, new media literacy and the ability to understand concepts across a wide range of disciplines are ctitical skills for the content curator in cutting through the noise to find that all important signal. Effective content curation will help us to focus and make sense of our complex and ambiguous world, to understand context and ultimately to make better decisons. 

Mary Reilley Clark's curator insight, July 5, 2013 5:24 PM

Good stuff on the last page about essential job skills and curation skills.  

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How to Reboot Your News Reading After Google Reader's Death | Fast Company

How to Reboot Your News Reading After Google Reader's Death | Fast Company | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

by Kevin Purdy

 

"Back in the early, buzzy days of what we called Web 2.0 (say, 2007), web addicts used Google to find neat links and used Digg to share them. Now Google wants to capture your sharing, Digg is a space to find things, and Digg is launching a Readerthat is basically a Google Reader reboot—along with Feedly, AOL Reader, Reeder, andFacebook.

 

"What is Digg and its peers giving us? A chance to start over, after the Google Reader funeral on July 1. You can import your entire Reader collection into these other options and start using them just like you did Reader--but you should not do that. Years of using Reader, and believing that you could always return to it to tidy things up, have likely given you a lazy list of feeds. Believe me, I know.

 

"As an editor at Lifehacker for more than 3 years, I spent hours of every work day inside Reader. I added a handful of new feeds every week, sometimes more. I set up folders by category, by "priority," by whim. In the end, it all became too much, and I just scanned the "All Items" list for as long as I could manage, hoping to wander past some magic. You don't want magic; you want to feel like you created your own newspaper, edited by someone smart (you).

 

"Whether you start using Digg Reader or choose another of the Reader replacements, refer back to these tips on making it work for you, whether you're an old Reader hand or just discovering this whole RSS-as-thought-stream space that Google gave up on."

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Seven Ways To Be Indispensable At Work In 2013 | Forbes

Seven Ways To Be Indispensable At Work In 2013 | Forbes | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

by Meghan Casserly

 

“The prevailing wisdom has been that to get ahead, you should learn something from one company and move on—and up—at the next,” says Brian Kropp, a managing director at CEB, an executive advisory firm which offers data analysis of more than 50,000 employee surveys from 10,000 organizations. “But that only produces short-term effects. In the new workplace we’re seeing greater emphasis on relationships,” he says, which means veteran employees are at a far greater advantage. According to CEB research, longer-tenured workers are beginning to rise to positions of success more quickly than those who move every few years.

 

"So what does this mean for 2013 career resolutions? Ditch the job boards and set to work making yourself an indispensable employee.

 

“Being indispensable is about being the best,” says Lucy Leske, Vice President and Co-Director,Education Practice at the executive search firm, Witt/Kieffer. “If you’re always striving to be a better, more valuable contributor, people will inevitably take note and you will get ahead.”

Without further pontification, seven simple strategies to becoming indispensable in 2013."

Jim Lerman's insight:

With the changes produced in the workplace by digital technology, this list of career advancement strategies seems to come from a place of wisdom.

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What Jaron Lanier Thinks of Technology Now | The New Yorker

What Jaron Lanier Thinks of Technology Now | The New Yorker | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

by Jennfier Kahn

 

"More recently, he has become the go-to pundit for people lamenting the social changes wrought by modern technology. Last year, he published “You Are Not a Gadget: A Manifesto,” a provocative critique of digital technologies, including Wikipedia (which he called a triumph of “intellectual mob rule”) and social-networking sites like Facebook and Twitter, which he has described as dehumanizing and designed to encourage shallow interactions. Teen-agers, he writes, may vigilantly maintain their online reputations, but they do so “driven more by fear than by love.” In our conversation about Facebook’s face-recognition software, he added, “It’ll just create a more paranoid society with a fakey-fakey social life—much like what happened in Communist countries, where people had a fake social life that the Stasi could see, and then this underground life.”

 

"Such objections have made Lanier an unusual figure: he is a technology expert who dislikes what technology has become. “I’m disappointed with the way the Internet has gone in the past ten years,” he told me at one point. He added, “I’ve always felt that the human-centered approach to computer science leads to more interesting, more exotic, more wild, and more heroic adventures than the machine-supremacy approach, where information is the highest goal.”

Jim Lerman's insight:

In a nutshell (which suffers greatly from simplification) Lanier blames digital techanology for destruction of the middle class, and with that, democracy.

It's a lot to think about, but I think he's on to something profound...and so do a lot of other people (judging by the sales of his books and his warm reviews by critics).

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Conversations for Inquiring Minds's curator insight, June 27, 2013 9:31 AM

Although I couldn't do without my electronic gadgets, I do agree with Lanier on the human element.  Without a human context and critical thinking, information does no good.  In fact, information can do much harm because the attitude of if it's on the internet it must be true is laughable; however, it appears many don't get the joke and depend on others to tell them how to think.

 

I hope innovation is around the corner but I fear much of Lanier's critique of technology is right on the money.

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Enhancing Education: The 5 E's: instructional model based on constructivism: Engage, Explore, Explain, Elaborate, and Evaluate.

Enhancing Education: The 5 E's: instructional model based on constructivism: Engage, Explore, Explain, Elaborate, and Evaluate. | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

The 5 E's is an instructional model based on the constructivist approach to learning, which says that learners build or construct new ideas on top of their old ideas. The 5 E's can be used with students of all ages, including adults.

Each of the 5 E's describes a phase of learning, and each phase begins with the letter "E": Engage, Explore, Explain, Elaborate, and Evaluate. The 5 E's allows students and teachers to experience common activities, to use and build on prior knowledge and experience, to construct meaning, and to continually assess their understanding of a concept.

Engage: This phase of the 5 E's starts the process. An "engage" activity should do the following:

Make connections between past and present learning experiences Anticipate activities and focus students' thinking on the learning outcomes of current activities. Students should become mentally engaged in the concept, process, or skill to be learned.

 

Explore: This phase of the 5 E's provides students with a common base of experiences. They identify and develop concepts, processes, and skills. During this phase, students actively explore their environment or manipulate materials.

Explain: This phase of the 5 E's helps students explain the concepts they have been exploring. They have opportunities to verbalize their conceptual understanding or to demonstrate new skills or behaviors. This phase also provides opportunities for teachers to introduce formal terms, definitions, and explanations for concepts, processes, skills, or behaviors.

Elaborate: This phase of the 5 E's extends students' conceptual understanding and allows them to practice skills and behaviors. Through new experiences, the learners develop deeper and broader understanding of major concepts, obtain more information about areas of interest, and refine their skills.

Evaluate: This phase of the 5 E's encourages learners to assess their understanding and abilities and lets teachers evaluate students' understanding of key concepts and skill development. 

...

http://www.aea267.k12.ia.us/science/files/BSCS_5E_Instructional_Model.pdf

...

http://www.voyagesthroughtime.org/curriculum/instructional.html


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China’s new education reform: Reducing importance of test scores | Washington Post

China’s new education reform: Reducing importance of test scores | Washington Post | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

by Valerie Strauss

Guest Post by Yong Zhao

 

"China just began a major education reform effort that is aimed at reducing the importance of standardized testing in determining school quality and including factors such as student engagement, boredom, anxiety, and happiness. It also seeks to cut back on the amount of school work students are given. As scholar Yong Zhao notes in the following post, the approach is the opposite of the education reform path in the United States, which in recent years has increased the importance of test scores for accountability purposes.

 

"Chinese documents explaining the reason for the reform are remarkable, noting that the obsession with test scores “severely hamper student development as a whole person, stunt their healthy growth, and limit opportunities to cultivate social responsibilities, creative spirit, and practical abilities in students.”

 

"Yong Zhao is the presidential chair and associate dean for global education at the University of Oregon’s College of Education, where he also serves as the director of the Center for Advanced Technology in Education, and is a fellow of the International Academy for Education. This appeared on his blog."

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Report: Students Taking Online Courses Jumps 96 Percent over 5 Years | Campus Technology

Report: Students Taking Online Courses Jumps 96 Percent over 5 Years | Campus Technology | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

by Joshua Bolkan

 

"The number of college students taking at least one online course nearly doubled, from 23 percent to 45, over the last five years according to the 2013 College Explorer, a new report from market research companyre:fuel. Students taking online courses are also enrolled in an average of two per term, according to the report.

 

"Though the number of students turning to the Internet for their education is increasing at a rapid clip, the reviews are mixed."

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Challenge Bank | Critical Skills Program-Antioch University New England

Challenge Bank | Critical Skills Program-Antioch University New England | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

from the website

 

"The primary methodology in use is the challenge — a carefully crafted problem to solve which connects the curriculum to its real-world application. Challenges can be highly complex or quite simple, may take minutes or weeks to complete, and are driven by the state, local, or national subject area curricula as well as by the formative assessment gained via ongoing student reflection. Elementary students may grapple with the problem of selecting the largest apple to present to the principal following a field trip, secondary students might be seeking alternative energy transportation options for the district or creating a new grammar text using only a small set of short stories and newspaper articles. The exact challenges are as diverse as the teachers who create them and the students for whom they are created. But all share three components:

-The students engage

-The students exhibit their learning

-The students debrief their learning

Download sample challenges below (Word format)."

 

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Jim Lerman's curator insight, June 26, 2013 9:35 AM

This is a marvelous collection of nearly 70 challenge-based units designed by teachers to "address many of the challenges faced by educators today:

 

-implementing the Common Core State Standards

-designing real-world, problem-based learning experiences

-shaping safe, collaborative classroom and school cultures

-integrating critical skill development with content learning

-implementing competency-based assessment practices

-achieving substantive and compelling learning for students

 

"The Critical Skills were identified through an extensive and unique collaboration among educators, business people, government officials, and community leaders. The work of this taskforce was to examine and articulate the skills critical for success to meet the many demands in today’s complex and everchanging world. These are the skills needed by all graduates from our schools and should be a classroom focus, alongside the subject matter, at all grade levels."

-Problem Solving

-Critical Thinking

-Decision Making

-Creative Thinking

-Communication

-Collaboration

-OrganizationLeadership

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CUNY Games Festival, January 17, 2104 | CUNY Games Network

CUNY Games Festival, January 17, 2104 | CUNY Games Network | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

From the website

 

"The City University of New York (CUNY) will be holding a one-day conference and festival dedicated to game-based learning pedagogies in higher education on January 17, 2014. We aim to bring together faculty, researchers, graduate and undergraduate students, game designers, and domain experts from various disciplines. Both CUNY and non-CUNY participation is welcome.

 

"We are offering three general types of session formats: full-length presentations, short presentations, and more interactive demonstrations, including playtests of games-in-progress and post-mortems of completed projects. Proposals are due October 1st, 2013."

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Scottish Schools Focus on More Than Just Tests | NY Times

Scottish Schools Focus on More Than Just Tests | NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

by D.D. Guttenplan

Summary by ASCD Worldwide Edition SmartBrief

 

"While the US and England have focused on assessments and testing in education, Scotland's schools have gone another route -- instead prioritising a more flexible and interdisciplinary curriculum, fewer exams and focusing on debate and discussion, rather than memorisation. "Some people believe that increasing assessment increases standards, but we've moved away from that," said Barry Smedley, deputy head of a school in Scotland. "It used to be that only students who did well on exams were thought of as the smart ones. But we've learned that there are different kinds of smart, different kinds of intelligence."

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Steven Johnson: The Liquid Network Of Ideas | hypebot

Steven Johnson: The Liquid Network Of Ideas | hypebot | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

from the website

 

"When it comes to ideas, we often give ourselves more credit than we deserve. The time that a lone genius spends 'toiling away' may not be as important as the moment that he went out for coffee and conversed with friends. Ideas are part of larger networks of connections, not the singular trajectory of epiphany.  Though it may seem like we’re struck with that lightning bolt of inspiration—that storm had been brewing the whole time. Sometimes, we try so hard to bring our ideas into fruition that we only obfuscate their insight. Frustrated, we leave our workstations and take a walk.

 

"Then, like a catching a bag of bricks, the true nature of that idea becomes revealed to us. In this TED talk, Steven Berlin Johnson lectures about these things and many others. Researching for his book Where Good Ideas Come From, Johnson wanted to gain a better understanding of the environments that germinate ideas. What Johnson found is that we’re not always as honest about the origin of our ideas as we think we are. Like others, we’d like to believe that our ideas come in flashes of insight, when really, they had been culminating over months and months; it was just a matter of the neural connections in our brains and lives reaching the optimum state of liquidity for the true idea to emerge."

Jim Lerman's insight:

Johnson getting some buzz at ISTE 2013 in the twitterverse

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