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European Report on the Future of Learning

European Report on the Future of Learning | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

The Vision

From the executive summary:


"Personalisation, collaboration and informal learning will be at the core of learning in the future. The increased pace of change will bring new skills and competences to the fore, in particular generic, transversal and cross-cutting skills….


With the evolution of ICT, personalised learning and individual mentoring will become a reality and teachers/trainers will need to be trained to exploit the available resources and tools to support tailor-made learning pathways and experiences which are motivating and engaging, but also efficient, relevant and challenging…"

 

 

Redecker, C. et al. (2011) The Future of Learning: Preparing for Change Seville Spain: Institute for Prospective Technological Studies, JRC, European Commission


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Impact of the internet age on human culture and education policy/administration
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Introducing this work

Introducing this work | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

For the purposes of this Scoop.it site, the history of human interaction with information may be divided into 4 eras. The first (spoken) era ended with the invention of writing around 3000-4000 BC. The second era ended with the invention of the printing press in 1440. The third era ended, and the fourth began, with the invention of the Internet (depending how one defines its operational beginning) somewhere between 1969 and 1982. We now exist early, but decidedly, in the fourth era.

 

All readers may not agree with this interpretation of the history of information, especially with the division and numbering of the eras. That is not the main point. Rather, it is that humankind is presently existing in an era distinctly different from the one that preceded it -- that in fact, this new era is accompanied with, and characterized by, a new - and quite different - information landscape. This new Internet information landscape will challenge, disrupt, and overpower the print-oriented one that came before it. It will not completely obliterate that which preceded it, but it will render it to a subsidiary, rather than primary, level of influence.

 

Just as the printing press altered humanity's relationship with information, thereby resulting in massive restructuring of political, religious, economic, social, educational, cultural, scientific, and other realms of life; so too will the advance of digital technology occasion analogous transformations in the corresponding universe of present and future human activity.

 

This site will concern itself primarily with how K-20 education in the US, and the people who comprise its constituencies, may be affected by this transformative movement from one era to the next. All ideas considered here appear, to me at least, to impact the learning enterprise in some way. Accordingly, this work looks at the present and the future through a lens that is predominantly, but far from entirely, a digital one. -JL

 

Opinions expressed, scooped, or copied in this Scoop.it topic are my own, or a result of my own judgment, and should in no way be understood to reflect those of my employer.

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Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:43 AM
Jim - I like your perspective. Great subject matter here!
Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:46 AM
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Azania Nduli-AmaZulu UbuntuPsychology.ORG's curator insight, July 8, 2013 6:24 PM

Beautiful!

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[PDF] Unleashing greatness nine plays to spark innovation in education

[PDF] Unleashing greatness nine plays to spark innovation in education | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Adequacy is an unacceptable outcome in education and learning. Students need and deserve more. Leaders can do better. Government must strive towards becoming increasingly accountable to its citizens and effective in its working. We grew up on opposite sides of the Atlantic Ocean (Joel from Queens, New York, and Michael from Liverpool, United Kingdom), but have forged a deep friendship based on these beliefs. We share a desire to see great education systems marked by students succeeding – from all backgrounds and all types of schools – where equity goes hand in hand with diversity, and both are propelled by excellence.
 
We know from history and our own experience that great education systems cannot be created solely through an edict from Whitehall or Washington, DC. To do this, whole system reform – such as that seen in Madrid, Punjab, London and New York City – must be paired with systemic innovation. As we have learned, you can mandate adequacy, but you cannot mandate greatness: it has to be unleashed.
 
This playbook serves to continue a conversation around the second component of great education systems – how to spark innovation in education. It offers a series of plays as a complement, not a substitute, to holistic system reform. A focus on innovation should not distract from efforts to raise student achievement, ensuring that every student has a “high floor” of expectations and support underneath their feet.

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What is the Cognitive Load Theory? A definition for teachers

What is the Cognitive Load Theory? A definition for teachers | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Preface: I’m (very clearly) not a neurologist. While I often have dedicated a lot of thought and research into things I write, sometimes I write about things in order to understand them–or understand them better. This is one of those times. Caveat emptor.

Generally, the Cognitive Load Theory is a theory about learning built on the premise that since the brain can only do so many things at once, we should be intentional about what we ask it to do.

It was developed in 1998 by psychologist John Sweller, and the School of Education at New South Wales University released a paper in August of 2017 that delved into theory. The paper has a great overview–and even stronger list of citations–of the theory. They also, obviously, define and explain it:

‘Cognitive load theory is based on a number of widely accepted theories about how human brains process and store information (Gerjets, Scheiter & Cierniak 2009, p. 44). These assumptions include: that human memory can be divided into working memory and long-term memory; that information is stored in the long-term memory in the form of schemas; and that processing new information results in ‘cognitive load’ on working memory which can affect learning outcomes (Anderson 1977; Atkinson & Shiffrin 1968; Baddeley 1983).’

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The Learning Innovation Cycle

The Learning Innovation Cycle | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Disruption is an interesting topic for the same reason that cowboys, gangsters, and villains are interesting. It’s unpredictable. Problematic. Against the grain.

It’s kind of aging as a buzzword in the “education space,” but it’s other-worldly powerful, and there are few things education needs more. How exactly it produces change is less clear, but I thought I’d create a model to think about. First, a quick preface. The iconic vision of disruptive innovation comes from Clayton Christensen, who uses the term to “describe a process by which a product or service takes root initially in simple applications at the bottom of a market and then relentlessly moves up market, eventually displacing established competitors.”

“Companies pursue these “sustaining innovations” at the higher tiers of their markets because this is what has historically helped them succeed: by charging the highest prices to their most demanding and sophisticated customers at the top of the market, companies will achieve the greatest profitability. However, by doing so, companies unwittingly open the door to “disruptive innovations” at the bottom of the market. An innovation that is disruptive allows a whole new population of consumers at the bottom of a market access to a product or service that was historically only accessible to consumers with a lot of money or a lot of skill.”

I usually think of disruption as any change that forces itself substantially on existing power sets. This force causes transfer–a redistribution of something–market share, money, credibility, knowledge, or something we collectively value. Here, in this literal re-vision (seeing again) and neo-vision (seeing new), is where enduring learning innovation can be born.

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Fiona Leigh's curator insight, September 24, 9:59 PM
A little disruption never did anyone any harm
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8 Powerful Voices in Defense of Public Education - Diane Ravitch

8 Powerful Voices in Defense of Public Education - Diane Ravitch | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Listen to Diane Ravitch clearly explain how public education is being damaged by the billionaires who want to destroy your community public schools.
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Poor Students Face Digital Divide in How Teachers Learn to Use Tech

Poor Students Face Digital Divide in How Teachers Learn to Use Tech | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

What distinguishes the most innovative schools is what students and teachers do with the technology they have. Parents want their children prepared to shape the future, not get steamrolled by it.


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Juanita Amiel Garcia's curator insight, September 8, 12:00 AM

If this is true in US, then how much more so on a global scale?

Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.'s curator insight, September 20, 8:33 AM

I talked to a brand new teacher recently who wondered why she'd bothered to go to college since her education program prepared her for very little of what actually happens in her school, a Title 1 school. She has little to no familiarity with technology or even where to go to find resources to figure out what's best to use when. When she does try to research something, she is overwhelmed by the options. She is not alone. A tech coach can help provided the tech coach isn't split between numerous buildings and provided the tech coach has time and opportunity to research other options and knows how to ask teachers questions about what they need and want, especially since most teachers don't know what they don't know. It's a conundrum not easily solved by working with an edtech consultant, though that is a solution. You can find me on Twitter @elainej or check out my web site: http://www.p20partners.com. I can help.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, September 23, 3:09 AM
Digital divide
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The Education Department Will Allow Two Large For-Profit Colleges To Become Nonprofits

The Education Department Will Allow Two Large For-Profit Colleges To Become Nonprofits | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
The Education Department has offered its stamp of approval for the controversial sale of two massive for-profit colleges, Kaplan University and the Art Institutes, according to emails obtained by BuzzFeed News — allowing both schools to convert to nonprofit colleges. Kaplan, which was purchased by Purdue University, will become a public college.

The two high-profile conversions have been closely watched by the for-profit education industry, which sees them as a bellwether for future attempts to convert to nonprofits. More and more for-profit colleges have been eyeing conversions as the industry continues to struggle to enroll students.

But there were questions about whether conversions would be allowed by federal overseers. The Obama administration had begun to block such deals over concerns that schools would not actually operate as nonprofits, independent from the for-profit entities that once owned them. There were also worries in and out of the administration that nonprofit conversions were being used to evade regulations.
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Midwives Chronicle: The Heritage Blog of the Royal College of Midwives

Midwives Chronicle: The Heritage Blog of the Royal College of Midwives | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Midwifery history from the Royal College of Midwives [UK]. [Above image from 1601]

 

"The UK's Royal College of Midwives (RCM) dates back to 1881, and continues to work "to enhance the confidence, professional practice and influence of midwives for the benefit of child-bearing women and their families, nationally and internationally." The RCM also authors the Midwives Chronicle and Nursing Notes, a blog dedicated to the history of midwifery, featuring archival items from its extensive library. Several recent posts allows visitors to read select interviews from the the Midwife's Tale Oral History project, which centered on stories of midwives and women who gave birth during the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s. These interviews provide insight into an evolving profession and address a range of issues, including relationships between midwives and doctors, the experience of giving birth as a trained midwife, and postpartum depression. (Interested visitors can check out the full transcripts of all of these interviews via a link included in these posts). Another recent post allows visitors to read the very first issue of Nursing Notes: A Practical Journal, published in 1888."

 

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Teaching & Assessing Soft Skills via Catlin Tucker

Teaching & Assessing Soft Skills via Catlin Tucker | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
The career landscape is changing dramatically. The Bureau of Labor Statistics states that the average worker currently holds ten different jobs before the age of forty. This requires a high degree of flexibility and adaptability. Students who leave high school

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Supporting Students' Social, Emotional, and Academic Development: The Evidence Base for How We Learn

"Major domains of human development—social, emotional, cognitive, linguistic, academic—are deeply intertwined in the brain and in behavior, and all are central to learning.

 

"These skills can be grouped into three interconnected domains: (1) cognitive skills including executive functions such as working memory, attention control and flexibility, inhibition, and planning, as well as beliefs and attitudes that guide one’s sense of self and approaches to learning and growth; (2) emotional competencies that enable one to cope with frustration, recognize and manage emotions, and understand others’ emotions and perspectives; and (3) social and interpersonal skills that enable one to read social cues, navigate social situations, resolve interpersonal conflicts, cooperate with others and work effectively in a team, and demonstrate compassion and empathy toward others.

 

"Drawing on evidence from a range of disciplines and perspectives, it is clear that social and emotional skills and competencies develop in a complex system of contexts, interactions, and relationships.iv Therefore, it is important for organizations to take a systems approach to promoting development in these areas— addressing adult skills and beliefs; organizational culture, climate, and norms; and routines and structures that guide basic interactions and instruction. As described in greater detail below, such approaches are most effective when designed to match the needs and contexts of specific organizations and communities."

 

 

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The Art of the OKR

The Art of the OKR | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

The OKR approach to setting goals has been used at Google, Linkedin, Zynga, General Assembly and beyond and is spreading like wildfire across successful Silicon Valley companies.  The companies have adopted the approach are growing like weeds. OKRs provide focus, united the teams behind a single strategy, and makes all goals into stretch goals.  If  want to get your entire company to execute like the hounds of hell are behind them and the gates of Valhalla are open before them, try the OKR approach out.

"OKR stands for Objectives and Key Results. The form of the OKR has been more or less standardized. The Objective is qualitative, and the KR’s (most often three) are quantitative. They are used to focus a group or individual around a bold goal. The objective sets a goal for a set period of time, usually a quarter. The key results tell you if the objective has been met by the end of the time.

"Before you set OKRs, it is critical your company have a mission. Without a sense of purpose AND a scope to accomplish it, anything you do is equally ok.  I’ve written a bit on this in the North Star post."

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Copyright Lessons for Students and Teachers :: Richard Byrne

Copyright Lessons for Students and Teachers :: Richard Byrne | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Taking the Mystery Out of Copyright is a resource for kids produced by the Library of Congress. Taking the Mystery Out of Copyright is intended to help elementary school students understand the purposes and functions of copyright. There are four sections to Taking the Mystery Out of Copyright. The first section, Copyright Exposed, features a short cartoon that explains how copyright protects artists. Files on Record, the second section, chronicles important historical developments in copyright law. The third section, Reading the Fine Print, answers common questions and addresses common myths about copyright laws. The last section, Steps to Copyright, instructs students on registering their own works for copyright protection.
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Let’s Tax the Collection and Storage of Personal Information

Let’s Tax the Collection and Storage of Personal Information | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Now I’m not a tax genius. But I know that if I did consulting work for you and you paid me with a car, that car is income. It’s taxable. It’s also potentially taxable as property. If at the end of the year I have a bunch of cars sitting around from clients, that’s profit. The IRS doesn’t say, well these are cars, they are not payment. So why when I give Google my personal data in exchange for services is that not income?

So tax it. And because it has worse effects on society than holding on to money, tax it at a higher rate, and in more ways.

Taxing personal data collected from individuals would force companies to make decisions about what data to collect and keep with the externalities priced in. We could imagine pricing data on individuals at about $10/MB, and taxing it yearly at 10%. To remind you: a megabyte is quite a lot of data. The entire text of Shakespeare’s Hamlet is less than a fifth of a megabyte. If Google and Equifax won’t pay $1 a year to hold a megabyte on you, then clearly the social risks of holding that data outweigh the benefits. No one doubts that holding a megabyte of data on someone confers more more social risk than a dollar a year. If that data is not worth that to them, they should let it go.
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16 skills students need to learn today to thrive tomorrow

16 skills students need to learn today to thrive tomorrow | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Will classes in curiosity, problem-solving and creative thinking soon be on the curriculum? Our latest report thinks it should.

Via Nik Peachey, Lisa Marie Blaschke, Jim Lerman
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Jim Lerman's curator insight, April 2, 2016 4:02 PM
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[PDF] Teaching in the machine age: How innovation can make bad teachers good and good teachers better

[PDF] Teaching in the machine age: How innovation can make bad teachers good and good teachers better | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
As scientific understanding and artificial intelligence leap forward, many professions—such as law, accounting, animation, and medicine—are changing in dramatic ways. Increasingly, these advances allow non-experts and machines to perform tasks that were previously in the sole domain of experts, thus turning expert-quality work into a commodity. With new technologies displacing workers across many fields, what will be the likely impact on the teaching profession? Will machines replace teachers?

Despite the hype and fear, machines are unlikely to replace teachers anytime soon. Rather, they are poised to help overcome several structural barriers that make it difficult to ensure that an effective teacher reaches every student.

School systems face a number of challenges, including teacher shortages, a lack of clear methods for developing high-quality teachers, and teacher burnout and attrition, to name a few. And even the best teachers struggle to address the diverse learning needs of their students or find time to focus on developing students’ deeper learning and noncognitive skills amidst pressures to cover core instruction.

Innovations that commoditize teacher expertise by simplifying and automating basic teaching tasks provide school leaders with new options for addressing three challenging circumstances:

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preparing for perpetual beta :: Harold Jarche

preparing for perpetual beta :: Harold Jarche | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
The latest technology gadget or silicon valley ‘disruptive’ business model is merely incremental change. But I am convinced that we are living in the middle of an epochal change. I use David Ronfeldt’s TIMN model (2009)  to explain that we are shifting from a tri-form society, where markets dominate, to a quadriform society, where networks dominate. This new societal form will be one of working and learning in perpetual beta.
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Eight billionaires 'as rich as world's poorest half' - BBC News

Eight billionaires 'as rich as world's poorest half' - BBC News | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Oxfam research finds the eight richest billionaires have as much wealth as 3.6 billion people combined.

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Is There Any Difference between Competency-Based Education and Mastery-Based Learning? « Competency Works

Is There Any Difference between Competency-Based Education and Mastery-Based Learning? « Competency Works | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
However you define CBE, the intent is to be clear about a student’s precise skillsets, dispositions, and capabilities in a way that seat-time-based learning is ill-equipped to reveal. A list of college credits and grades on a transcript or even a diploma more generally are poor proxies of what a student can do. Competencies, in contrast, offer a legible and meaningful reflection of what a student both knows and can do with that knowledge.

There is a fundamental core of CBE, and it’s unlikely that your definition diverges radically from the essence of these tenets. That being said, however, people should be ready to witness a wild proliferation of different learning pathways that stem from these same core definitions.
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7 Questions Principals Should Ask When Hiring Future-Ready Teachers

7 Questions Principals Should Ask When Hiring Future-Ready Teachers | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
That’s a rigorous standard by which to measure effective teaching and requires a mindset switch about what education is for and how it will remain relevant to students growing up in a world that is more connected and less stable than ever before.

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Nik Peachey's curator insight, September 12, 4:19 AM

Love these questions.

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Fall Foliage Map 2017 & Nationwide Peak Leaf Forecast

Fall Foliage Map 2017 & Nationwide Peak Leaf Forecast | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
When will the leaves start changing? When will they peak? Our 2017 Fall Foliage Map and leaf prediction tool has the answers you are looking for.

 

via the Scout Report

 

"Smoky Mountains National Park has released this helpful, interactive map that predicts when foliage lovers can expect to see fall colors this upcoming September and October. By selecting a date, visitors can view where trees are expected to be at "peak" color across the county. Predictions are organized by week (from the week of August 13th through the week of October 29th) and expressed via a scale of seven descriptions, from "No Change" to "Past Peak." In addition to this interactive map, visitors can find a helpful scientific explanation of why leaves turn color in the autumn, and what unique chemical compounds can be found in orange, red, and yellow leaves. These explanations are designed to be accessible to learners of all ages and provide a way for caretakers and educators to engage young nature enthusiasts with the science and beauty of autumn."

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Collection of Papers on Quality in Higher Education

Collection of Papers on Quality in Higher Education | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Higher Learning Commission - Collection of Papers on Quality in Higher Education

 

"Established in 1895, the Higher Learning Commission accredits college and university institutions in nineteen states. The Commission hosts an annual conference that invites participating institutions to speak on the accreditation process, as well as best practices for institutional administration, curriculum, and pedagogy. A collection of papers is published from each annual conference - the link above takes visitors to an organized collection of papers from 2016, which can be browsed by category. Individual paper topics include: developing meaningful assessments with limited resources, using social media to engage institutional stakeholders, and developing a "graduate experience" in two-year master's programs. These papers are authored by professionals at public universities, private four-year colleges, and two-year colleges. Additionally, visitors can explore archived collections of papers dating back to 2013 in the Archives tab."

 

via The Scout Report

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, September 19, 3:51 PM
It is interesting to explore what is being done by others and their research findings.
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Putting It All Together - The Aspen Institute

Putting It All Together - The Aspen Institute | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"The first case study from the Aspen Institute’s National Commission on Social, Emotional, and Academic Development (SEAD) shows how schools and educators enhance learning when they teach a curriculum that simultaneously builds students’ social, emotional, and academic understanding.

 

"Putting It All Together discusses how an integrative approach is different from developing social emotional skills through stand-alone programs, details the benefits of such an approach, acknowledges the challenges to doing this work well, and provides supports and strategies for overcoming those challenges.

"The case study vividly paints a picture of what this looks like by sharing on-the-ground examples from across the country. At Capital City Public Charter School in D.C., students learn collaboration, critical feedback, and leadership skills in its lessons across subject areas, developing key social skills that are essential for academic learning as well as for later professional life. San Francisco Unified School District’s “growth mindset” math program builds students’ confidence, persistence, and ability to take academic risks by teaching that mistakes are an essential part of learning.

"Other examples include:

-The Facing History and Ourselves curriculum engages students in examining racism, prejudice, and intolerance to try to develop a more humane and informed citizenry.
-The New Tech Network of schools uses project-based learning to make learning authentic and encourage students to collaborate.
-The Center for the Collaborative Classroom’s curriculum helps to support the academic, ethical, and social development of children."

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Feds release data on nondegree credentials, including certificates and licenses

Feds release data on nondegree credentials, including certificates and licenses | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
More than one quarter of Americans hold a non-degree credential, such as a certificate or an occupational license or certification, according to new data from the federal government. And 21 percent have a completed a work experience program such as an internship, residency or apprenticeship.
The new report from the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics is based on responses from 47,744 adults to a 2016 survey. Its goal, the department said, was to learn more about the prevalence of these credentials as well as to gauge perceptions about their value in the job market.
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A Unified Theory for Designing Just About Anything – Christina Wodtke – Medium

A Unified Theory for Designing Just About Anything – Christina Wodtke – Medium | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Using CAMP
"CAMP can be a diagnostic tool, as I had first intended. When student work is off, I can ask myself “what is broken here?” Incomplete understanding of context? Wrong context? Lack of architecture? Inharmonious mechanics? Not enough testing to

assure the Poetics meet the intent?


"But more and more I find myself turning to CAMP as I make my own work. I use CAMP when I design a class."

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

A wonderful article on one educator/designer's search/journey for a way to approach design. Along the way, author Wodtke shares many links of value. Her unified theory, CAMP, appears to offers great promise for educators.

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Opinion | The Suburb of the Future, Almost Here :: NY Times

Opinion | The Suburb of the Future, Almost Here :: NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"...millennial suburbanites want a new kind of landscape. They want breathing room but disdain the energy wastefulness, visual monotony and social conformity of postwar manufactured neighborhoods. If new suburbs can hit the sweet spot that accommodates the priorities of that generation, millennial habitats will redefine everyday life for all suburbanites, which is 70 percent of Americans.

How can technology, revolutionary design and planning transform suburban living?

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Developing a critical mind against fake news

Developing a critical mind against fake news | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
"Having moved from light surfing, babbling and chatting to data mining for the purpose of manipulation and destabilization, the digital transformation of the media landscape underscores the growing importance of media and information literacy. This form of education must rethink the media and the political and ethical foundations that legitimize it."

Via Manuel Pinto, Sarantis Chelmis
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, September 17, 12:36 AM

Thanks to Jim Lerman.