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Classrooms as Global Communication Centers by Lisa Nielsen on Prezi

This presentation will outline ways that internet access can transform learning in classrooms across the globe.

Via João Greno Brogueira
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:: The 4th Era ::
Exploration of the new era in human history marked by invention of the Internet
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Introducing this work

Introducing this work | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

For the purposes of this Scoop.it site, the history of human interaction with information may be divided into 4 eras. The first (spoken) era ended with the invention of writing around 3000-4000 BC. The second era ended with the invention of the printing press in 1440. The third era ended, and the fourth began, with the invention of the Internet (depending how one defines its operational beginning) somewhere between 1969 and 1982. We now exist early, but decidedly, in the fourth era.

 

All readers may not agree with this interpretation of the history of information, especially with the division and numbering of the eras. That is not the main point. Rather, it is that humankind is presently existing in an era distinctly different from the one that preceded it -- that in fact, this new era is accompanied with, and characterized by, a new - and quite different - information landscape. This new Internet information landscape will challenge, disrupt, and overpower the print-oriented one that came before it. It will not completely obliterate that which preceded it, but it will render it to a subsidiary, rather than primary, level of influence.

 

Just as the printing press altered humanity's relationship with information, thereby resulting in massive restructuring of political, religious, economic, social, educational, cultural, scientific, and other realms of life; so too will the advance of digital technology occasion analogous transformations in the corresponding universe of present and future human activity.

 

This site will concern itself primarily with how K-20 education in the US, and the people who comprise its constituencies, may be affected by this transformative movement from one era to the next. All ideas considered here appear, to me at least, to impact the learning enterprise in some way. Accordingly, this work looks at the present and the future through a lens that is predominantly, but far from entirely, a digital one. -JL

 

Opinions expressed, scooped, or copied in this Scoop.it topic are my own and should in no way be understood to reflect those of my employer.

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Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:43 AM
Jim - I like your perspective. Great subject matter here!
Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:46 AM
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Azania Nduli-AmaZulu UbuntuPsychology.ORG's curator insight, July 8, 2013 6:24 PM

Beautiful!

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The Innovative Instructor | Pedagogy – Best Practices – Technology

The Innovative Instructor | Pedagogy – Best Practices – Technology | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Description by The Scout Report

 

"The Innovative Instructor is a regular newsletter published by John Hopkins University to provide instructional resources and ideas to higher education instructors. The publication, which is available both online and in print, is spearheaded by the John Hopkins Center for Educational Resources and authored by CER staff along with John Hopkins faculty and graduate instructors. The Innovative Instructor regularly publishes articles related to three categories: pedagogy, best practices, and technology. Recent topics include a discussion of the merits - or lack thereof - of oral exams, plagiarism and academic honesty, and the uses of simulations or models in the classroom. The Innovative Instructor is unique in that it is aimed at university instructors teaching all disciplines. And while aimed at higher education professionals, teachers at the high school level may also find some software tools or ideas of use here."

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MAKERSPACE TOOLS PRODUCT ROUNDUP | Tech Learning

MAKERSPACE TOOLS PRODUCT ROUNDUP | Tech Learning | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Making and makerspaces are becoming ever more popular—not only in K–12 education, but also in universities, libraries, and community spaces throughout the country. Those who are building makerspaces often ask what they should purchase for the space and what will get the most use for the price. While this is not an exhaustive list, the items discussed here would all make fantastic additions to a new or existing makerspace with the goal of helping to create innovators in the 21st century.
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High Test Scores At A Nationally Lauded Charter Network, But At What Cost?  :: Anya Kamenetz

High Test Scores At A Nationally Lauded Charter Network, But At What Cost?  :: Anya Kamenetz | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Since its inception nearly a decade ago in Silicon Valley, Rocketship has been among the most nationally applauded charter networks, hailed as an innovative model of blended learning.

Founder John Danner, who made a fortune in Internet advertising, originally envisioned enrolling 1 million students by 2020, relying on the strength of three pillars — "personalized learning" with software, excellent teachers and parent involvement — to raise the achievement of underserved students.

Today there are 13 Rocketship schools, with 6,000 students, in the San Francisco Bay Area, Nashville, Tenn., and Milwaukee, with one scheduled to open in Washington, D.C., this fall. The students, largely low-income and Hispanic, outperform their peers on state tests.

The school has impressed parents like Lety Gomez, who grew up in East San Jose and whose child attends Rocketship Fuerza Community Prep there.

She says from her very first visit, what she saw was, "Every single teacher and administrator ... motivated the students. They were encouraging the students. I have never seen that on any other campus [where] I myself went to school or that my children had attended." The company says that 91 percent of families return each year.

Yet despite its successes, as Rocketship has pushed to expand, some parents, teachers and community members have objected in public meetings, raising concerns about the school's tech-heavy instruction model, student-teacher ratio, and student health and safety."

Jim Lerman's insight:

Kamenetz, a prolific and assertive chronicler of current day education practices and policies, takes on the Rocketship charter network in a piece that has generated considerable controversy.

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NPR’s Deeply Unbalanced Profile Of Rocketship Charter Schools :: Alexander Russo

NPR’s Deeply Unbalanced Profile Of Rocketship Charter Schools :: Alexander Russo | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"It’s also interesting that neither Kamenetz nor her editors seem to be all that concerned about the possibility that such a piece might come off as more of a takedown than as straight journalism.

 

Perhaps it’s a sign of just how strong the anti-reform zeitgeist has become in journalism and in general, or a reflection of NPR’s comfortable audience. Perhaps the piece serves to help NPR make the case that its education coverage isn’t overly beholden to its funders (who include the Gates Foundation). Perhaps the piece is an attempt to generate controversy.

 

We don’t know. But there are certainly some legitimate journalistic questions about the story that should be addressed, and an unfortunate unwillingness by NPR to reflect or engage on its practices."

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

Russo, a high-profile writer on policies and controversies in education, offers a counter-argument to Kamenetz.

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International Journal of Computer Science Education in Schools

International Journal of Computer Science Education in Schools | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

The International Journal of Computer Education in Schools ( IJCEIS) is committed to increase the understanding of computer education in schools by publishing theoretical manuscripts, empirical studies and literature reviews. The journal focuses on exploring computer education in schools through pedagogical, cognitive and psychological perspectives. The target audience of the journal is; teachers, educators and professionals working in the field of computer education in schools, computer science education, technology enhanced learning, e-learning, programming, game based learning and learning through game design.


Via Yasemin Allsop
Jim Lerman's insight:

New journal. It will be free to read online; now accepting articles...to be published in fall 2016.

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Schools exacerbate the growing achievement gap between rich and poor, a 33-country study finds - The Hechinger Report

Schools exacerbate the growing achievement gap between rich and poor, a 33-country study finds - The Hechinger Report | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
ntral to the American dream is the notion that any kid, even one from the poorest of backgrounds, can study hard, do well in school and make it in our society. But many of us fear that the schoolhouse is no longer a path to the middle class. That fear grows with the rising number of U.S. schoolchildren in poverty, and the growing achievement gap in school between them and their wealthier peers.
A recent study examined how much of the achievement gap in math between rich and poor 15-year-old students can be attributed to what material the kids are learning in school, and it found, across 33 countries, that schools are teaching rich kids vastly different math content than poor kids. The researchers calculated that this educational content difference accounts for a third of the achievement gap, on average. (The remainder of the achievement gap is explained by socio-economic factors at home, such as family income and parental education.)
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TeachThought: We grow teachers

TeachThought: We grow teachers | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

by Terry Heick

 

"There is no perfect lesson, unit, or school any more than their can be a perfect song, flavor, or shade of blue.

Every student is different. Every single intelligent, forgetful, smiling, moody, enthusiastic, apathetic, reflective, short-sighted little (or big) human being that walks into your classroom on a daily basis has their own story–one full of promise, heart-break, and complexity. And this isn’t hippie nonsense. It’s true, and it matters.

So when we talk about student-centered classrooms, that too is a kind of generalization–more of an approach than a strategy. There can’t be one “student-centered” reading strategy, for example. Maybe a “class-centered,” but if it’s truly “student-centered,” well then you’d have one for each student, yes?

But what is universal? In our collective effort to design learning experiences, schools, curriculum, technology, and all the other bits of education just right, is it possible that we miss some of the more obvious pieces? Pieces that every single student needs?

That can be added to everything–curriculum, frameworks, school design, instructional strategies, and anything else that touches the mind of students?

What does every single student need–absolutely, positively have to have–to succeed inside and outside of the classroom?"

Jim Lerman's insight:

A very well articulated statement...well worth reading and considering.

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The Maker Movement, Equity, and Schools: Researcher Q&A

The Maker Movement, Equity, and Schools: Researcher Q&A | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Public schools' embrace of the maker movement has prompted a sharp new focus on equity and diversity.

Among those looking at the issue most deeply are Northwestern University researcher Shirin Vossoughi, Meg Escudé of San Francisco's Exploratorium, and independent learning scientist Paula Hooper. The trio co-authored "Making Through the Lens of Culture and Power: Toward Transformative Visions for Educational Equity," an essay that will appear in the Summer 2016 issue of the Harvard Educational Review.

In general, "maker education" refers to hands-on activities that support academic learning, problem-solving, and a mindset that values experimentation, growth, and collaboration. The movement has historically been rooted outside of school, either in science museums such as the Exploratorium or in the informal crafting and building activities that everyday people have employed for generations.

This month, as part of our annual Technology Counts report, Education Week took a deep look at the opportunities and challenges associated with bringing making into K-12 schools. 

One of the most important dynamics associated with this shift, argue Vossoughi, Escudé, and Hooper, involves efforts to recognize and value the "histories, needs, assets, and experiences of working-class students and students of color."

The trio's essay is based largely on their work developing and studying the Tinkering Afterschool Program, a partnership between the Exploratorium and local Boys & Girls Clubs in low-income communities in the Bay Area. They argue that it's critical for educators embracing making to challenge educational injustices (to ensure that lower-resourced schools also have access to making technologies, for example), to recognize a multicultural mix of making activities (such as sewing and crafting, in addition to computer science and robotics), and to focus on good pedadogy (including direct assistance from teachers, which is anathema to some in the maker community.)

I caught up with Vossoughi, Escudé, and Hooper by phone to discuss these issues in April, prior to the annual conference of the American Educational Research Association. Following is a transcript of our conversation, edited for length and clarity.
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TXTBKS :: Thinking with Google

TXTBKS :: Thinking with Google | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
In developed countries, sleek tablets and e-readers have replaced large, heavy textbooks. In the Philippines, however, even the cheapest electronic models cost more than a family's monthly income. Smart, the country's largest telecom, wanted to make textbooks more accessible using the only gadget most Filipino families own: an analog mobile phone. The company turned these phones into low-tech e-readers for students in an initiative called TXTBKS, which was launched in four partner schools with around 800 students.
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Redesigning the Remote: How Online Video Changes the Way Viewers Tune In :: Think with Google

Redesigning the Remote: How Online Video Changes the Way Viewers Tune In :: Think with Google | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Thanks to mobile, online video is always on-demand—people can watch virtually anywhere, anytime, and on any screen. That means more opportunities to reach consumers. New research from Flamingo and Ipsos Connect uncovers how new video consumption habits can help you meet your audience.
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German startup Blinkist raises $4 million to help you read nonfiction books in 15 minutes or less

German startup Blinkist raises $4 million to help you read nonfiction books in 15 minutes or less | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Blinkist, a Germany-based startup that gives you the gist of well-known nonfiction books in 15 minutes or less, has raised €4 million ($4.3 million) to accelerate product development and expand in the U.S. and across Europe.

Founded out of Berlin in 2012, Blinkist hires subject-expert writers to condense popular nonfiction titles into abridged versions, with a catalog that includes titles like Richard Dawkins’ The Greatest Show on Earth and Barack Obama’s The Audacity of Hope. Available on the Web, Android and iOS, Blinkist gives users one book each day for free, beyond which they must pay $50 per year for unlimited access, or $80 per year to include audio incarnations.
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Pisa tests to include 'global skills' and cultural awareness

Pisa tests to include 'global skills' and cultural awareness | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Pisa tests, an international standard for comparing education systems around the world, could include a new measurement of global skills in the next round of tests in 2018. The OECD, which runs the tests in maths, reading and science, is considering adding another test which would look at how well pupils can navigate an increasingly diverse world, with an awareness of different cultures and beliefs. The OECD's education director Andreas Schleicher explains why there is such a need for new rankings to show young people's competence in a world where globalisation is a powerful economic, political and cultural force.

Education leaders around the world are increasingly talking about the need to teach 'global competences' as a way of addressing the challenges of globalisation."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 26, 7:18 PM

They define global competence as: "the capacity to analyse global and intercultural issues critically and from multiple perspectives, to understand how differences affect perceptions, judgements, and ideas of self and others, and to engage in open, appropriate and effective interactions with others from different backgrounds on the basis of a shared respect for human dignity".

 

So I guess geography does matter then.  Who knew? 

 

Tagsgeography education, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

Dafnord 's curator insight, June 2, 1:23 AM
Kansainvälistyminen nousee uudeksi mitattavaksi asiaksi PISA-tutkimuksissa 2018. Miten mahtaa suomalaisten peruskoulujen käydä? Pystyvätkö ne globaalitaidoissa ja kulttuurienvälisessa osaamisessa yltämään samalle tasolle kuin kansainvälistymisessä pitkälle edistyneet Britannia, Hollanti, Belgia tai Tanska. Oma kokemukseni jo 10 vuotta jatkuneesta Intia-yhteistyöstä (http://www.eumind.net) ei ennakoi Suomen kouluille huipputuloksia. Mutta toivotaan parasta.
Jaume Busquets's curator insight, June 4, 7:41 AM
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#077: Teaching What You Don’t Know [PODCAST]

#077: Teaching What You Don’t Know [PODCAST] | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

A podcast about what one can do if caught in the university-level practice of  being assigned to teach a course one knows little about. -JL

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DHQ: Digital Humanities Quarterly: 2016

DHQ: Digital Humanities Quarterly: 2016 | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Description by The Scout Report

 

"Over the past couple of decades, humanities scholars have identified various ways to use technology to archive, analyze, and share content relating to the Humanities - including English literature, history, and art. The Digital Humanities Quarterly is a free, peer reviewed journal published by the Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations (ADHO), an international consortium of Digital Humanities organizations. Now in its ninth year of publication, the journal publishes scholarly articles, book reviews, and the occasional editorial addressing such issues as student experience and the digitization of epigraphy. Readers will also find a complete special issue about comics (which includes an article by Nicholas Sousanis, who wrote his dissertation at Columbia Teacher's College as a 125-page comic with citations), and another special issue about feminism in the digital humanities."

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The One-Room Schoolhouse That's A Model For The World

The One-Room Schoolhouse That's A Model For The World | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Nine-thousand feet up in the Colombian Andes, in the province of Boyacá, a little orange schoolhouse sits on a hillside dotted with flowers.

Thirty-three students, ages 4 through 11, walk as much as an hour to get here from their families' farms. The students greet reporters in English — "Welcome! Welcome!" — and Spanish, with a song and a series of performances.

In one, an 8-year-old in a green school uniform and a colorful feather mask recites a folk tale about a terrible, tobacco-smoking monster called a Mohan.

It's a charming presentation, but it's also a lot more than that. As she stands there talking in a clear, self-assured voice, this girl is also building confidence, practicing performance skills and learning how to share a stage with others.

It sort of feels like we've traveled back in time. But we're here because this school, and the international movement it's part of, called Escuela Nueva, just might be a global model for the future.

Clara Victoria Colbert, known to everyone as Vicky, founded Escuela Nueva in the mid-1970s.

She set out back then to take progressive, democratic education theories — cooperation, self-paced learning, arts-focused education — and apply them to some of the poorest, least-resourced schools in the world.
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Response: What NPR’s ‘Hit Piece’ Got Wrong in Attacking Rocketship’s ‘Impressive Results’ :: Preston Smith

Response: What NPR’s ‘Hit Piece’ Got Wrong in Attacking Rocketship’s ‘Impressive Results’ :: Preston Smith | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Last Friday, NPR’s Education blog published what is being called a “takedown piece” on Rocketship Education. As co-founder and CEO of Rocketship, a leading network of nonprofit public charter schools, I have grown accustomed to anti-charter attacks like this. But my staff and parents are not. They flooded my inbox over the weekend with outrage over the voices missing from this story. As for the voices included in the story, six of the nine Rocketship sources contacted me to express their frustration over how NPR’s blogger mischaracterized their comments (more on that below).
The story did get one thing right. Our students’ “results are undoubtedly impressive.” But rather than dig in and really understand what underlies our Rocketeers’ impressive achievements, NPR’s blogger, Anya Kamenetz, went to great pains in trying to undermine our success and defend her personal anti-testing thesis.

Eliminating the achievement gap is hard work. As Paul Tough’s latest work highlights, it is particularly hard for people who have not worked or lived in low-income communities to understand the unique challenges of teaching in high-poverty schools like Rocketship. And I’m sure it was very hard for Anya Kamenetz to understand, as she herself did not visit a single Rocketship school.

Why did 90% of our students return to Rocketship this year?
If our schools are really what NPR’s blogger portrayed, the critical question she didn’t ask is: Why did 90% of Rocketship students return this year? They don’t have to enroll at our school. They have a seat at their zoned district school waiting for them. But they come back, year after year. And they tell other families to do the same.

Jim Lerman's insight:

Smith, Rocketship's CEO, addresses Kamenetz's piece in a head-on confrontation.

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How Kids Learn Resilience  :: Paul Tough

How Kids Learn Resilience  :: Paul Tough | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"In 2013, for the first time, a majority of public-school students in this country—51 percent, to be precise—fell below the federal government’s low-income cutoff, meaning they were eligible for a free or subsidized school lunch. It was a powerful symbolic moment—an inescapable reminder that the challenge of teaching low-income children has become the central issue in American education.

The truth, as many American teachers know firsthand, is that low-income children can be harder to educate than children from more-comfortable backgrounds. Educators often struggle to motivate them, to calm them down, to connect with them. This doesn’t mean they’re impossible to teach, of course; plenty of kids who grow up in poverty are thriving in the classroom. But two decades of national attention have done little or nothing to close the achievement gap between poor students and their better-off peers.

In recent years, in response to this growing crisis, a new idea (or perhaps a very old one) has arisen in the education world: Character matters. Researchers concerned with academic-achievement gaps have begun to study, with increasing interest and enthusiasm, a set of personal qualities—often referred to as noncognitive skills, or character strengths—that include resilience, conscientiousness, optimism, self-control, and grit. These capacities generally aren’t captured by our ubiquitous standardized tests, but they seem to make a big difference in the academic success of children, especially low-income children....

But here’s the problem: For all our talk about noncognitive skills, nobody has yet found a reliable way to teach kids to be grittier or more resilient. And it has become clear, at the same time, that the educators who are best able to engender noncognitive abilities in their students often do so without really “teaching” these capacities the way one might teach math or reading—indeed, they often do so without ever saying a word about them in the classroom. This paradox has raised a pressing question for a new generation of researchers: Is the teaching paradigm the right one to use when it comes to helping young people develop noncognitive capacities?"

Jim Lerman's insight:

Tough, a writer who has devoted considerable attention to overcoming the achievement gap between low-income and higher-income students (k-16), works to drill down to a more nuanced consideration of how to help students become more resilient.

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How Fans Tune In to Sports on YouTube :: Think with Google

How Fans Tune In to Sports on YouTube :: Think with Google | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"People have more options than ever before to tune in to their favorite sports content, whether they're looking for locker room interviews, postgame highlights, or fitness advice. To find out how Americans follow their passion for sports with content online, we partnered with Ipsos Connect and Flamingo to survey people about their sports-viewing habits."

Jim Lerman's insight:

Some interesting data from Google on how people watch sports on YouTube.

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Is Estonia the new Finland?

Is Estonia the new Finland? | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Most educators and policymakers can rattle off a list of international educational powerhouses: Korea. Singapore. Japan. Finland.

 

But there’s an overlooked member of the list: Estonia. Even as educators from around the world flock to Finland to discover its magic formula, Estonia, just a two-hour ferry ride away, has not aroused the same degree of interest.

 

That could change if the country remains on its upward trajectory. In 2012, Estonia’s 15-year-olds ranked 11th in math and reading and sixth in science out of the 65 countries that participated in an international test that compares educational systems from around the world, called the Programme for International Student Assessment, or PISA.

 

In addition to beating out western nations such as France and Germany and essentially tying Finland in math and science, Estonia also had the smallest number of weak performers in all of Europe, about 10 percent in math and reading and 5 percent in science."

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Interests-to-Internships: When Students Take the Lead in Learning

Interests-to-Internships: When Students Take the Lead in Learning | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
College and career readiness is a ubiquitous education catch-phrase, but in reality many high schools focus primarily on the “college” side of the equation. In part, that’s because research has shown that young adults who graduate with college degrees tend to have better job prospects and earning potential throughout their lives, and educators rightly want to ensure that all students are able to take advantage of those opportunities. But what about the kids who just aren’t interested in college? And, even if kids do want to go to college, what might be lost in the development of a whole person when teenagers are asked to focus solely on traditional academics?

Various school models have tried to integrate more hands-on learning into the traditional school day, including schools in the Big Picture Learning network. One such such school in Oakland, MetWest High School, aims to help high school students explore their passions outside of school and bring that learning and experience back into the academic setting. MetWest focuses on relationships, relevance and rigor, in that order.
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Artificial Intelligence’s White Guy Problem

Artificial Intelligence’s White Guy Problem | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
While machine-learning technology can offer unexpected insights and new forms of convenience, we must address the current implications for communities that have less power, for those who aren’t dominant in elite Silicon Valley circles.

Currently the loudest voices debating the potential dangers of superintelligence are affluent white men, and, perhaps for them, the biggest threat is the rise of an artificially intelligent apex predator.

But for those who already face marginalization or bias, the threats are here.
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Evolution of TV: Reaching Audiences Across Screens  ::  Think with Google

Evolution of TV: Reaching Audiences Across Screens  ::  Think with Google | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Part one of our Evolution of TV series, 7 Dynamics Transforming TV, introduced the increasing shift of TV to delivery over the internet. Here we dig into the first dynamic—reaching fragmented audiences spread across hundreds of screens and devices—and discuss the challenges and opportunities for distributors, programmers, and advertisers.
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Is there a youth offer?

Is there a youth offer? | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
In this week’s blog, Matthew Walsham from Partnership for Young London explores the issues around cohesive impact measurement for the sector and addresses the need for further support for young people transitioning into adulthood.
Jim Lerman's insight:

Youth work from a British perspective. My,my, the policy language is so different from the U.S. -- actually seems rather opaque, at least to the uninitiated. Nevertheless, the current state of affairs, with both its similarities and differences, is quite interesting.

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Goodbye, Password. Banks Opt to Scan Fingers and Faces Instead.

Goodbye, Password. Banks Opt to Scan Fingers and Faces Instead. | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Some of the nation’s largest banks, acknowledging that traditional passwords are either too cumbersome or no longer secure, are increasingly using fingerprints, facial scans and other types of biometrics to safeguard accounts.

Millions of customers at Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase and Wells Fargo routinely use fingerprints to log into their bank accounts through their mobile phones. This feature, which some of the largest banks have introduced in the last few months, is enabling a huge share of American banking customers to verify their identities with biometrics. And millions more are expected to opt in as more phones incorporate fingerprint scans.

Other uses of biometrics are also coming online. Wells Fargo lets some customers scan their eyes with their mobile phones to log into corporate accounts and wire millions of dollars. Citigroup can help verify 800,000 of its credit card customers by their voices. USAA, which provides insurance and banking services to members of the military and their families, identifies some of its customers through their facial contours.
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Bad drivers are a good indicator of a corrupt government

Bad drivers are a good indicator of a corrupt government | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Traffic accidents kill 1.25 million people per year, and it’s well-known that those deaths are disproportionately in low- and middle-income countries. Over at CityMetric, writer James O’Malley has added an interesting wrinkle, by showing a correlation between the number of traffic fatalities in a country and the corruptness of its government."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 4, 8:52 AM

I love the last paragraph in this article because it echoes the "Broken Windows" theory--not at the neighborhood scale, but for the state.  Horrible driving isn't the worse thing for a country, but it is indicative of the degree of social trust in each other and in the collective system; corruption erodes both. 

 

"Bottom line: If you’re in a country where everyone drives on the sidewalk and nobody stops at stop signs, you can be pretty sure the government isn’t working right."

 

Tags: political, governancetransportation.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 10, 2:12 PM
Será?
Caitlyn Scott's curator insight, June 14, 1:05 AM
This article shows a scarily real insight into the effects of corruption on certain countries. Would be useful for situations where looking at the broad range of effects of corruption but also has some interesting statistics regarding earnings and road fatalities.