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Give voice to your apps: Why speech will replace touch as smart devices’ primary input ~ The Next Web

Give voice to your apps: Why speech will replace touch as smart devices’ primary input ~ The Next Web | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

by Rajat Harlalka 


"The potential for voice in apps is immense. An instance is including it in language learning apps to as an aid to handicapped users. In the future, wearable devices will fuel adoption of speech in mobile apps. While it may be some time before speech will replace touch as primary input to smartphone apps, developers need to start considering whether and how to add speech control to their apps to stay competitive.


"When I was in college and often working on my laptop, my mom often remarked, “Kids today will forget how to write with a pen. They will just type.” Well, mom, tomorrow’s kids are not even going to type. They’ll just speak."

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:: The 4th Era ::
Exploration of the new era in human history marked by invention of the Internet
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Introducing this work

Introducing this work | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

For the purposes of this Scoop.it site, the history of human interaction with information may be divided into 4 eras. The first (spoken) era ended with the invention of writing around 3000-4000 BC. The second era ended with the invention of the printing press in 1440. The third era ended, and the fourth began, with the invention of the Internet (depending how one defines its operational beginning) somewhere between 1969 and 1982. We now exist early, but decidedly, in the fourth era.

 

All readers may not agree with this interpretation of the history of information, especially with the division and numbering of the eras. That is not the main point. Rather, it is that humankind is presently existing in an era distinctly different from the one that preceded it -- that in fact, this new era is accompanied with, and characterized by, a new - and quite different - information landscape. This new Internet information landscape will challenge, disrupt, and overpower the print-oriented one that came before it. It will not completely obliterate that which preceded it, but it will render it to a subsidiary, rather than primary, level of influence.

 

Just as the printing press altered humanity's relationship with information, thereby resulting in massive restructuring of political, religious, economic, social, educational, cultural, scientific, and other realms of life; so too will the advance of digital technology occasion analogous transformations in the corresponding universe of present and future human activity.

 

This site will concern itself primarily with how K-20 education in the US, and the people who comprise its constituencies, may be affected by this transformative movement from one era to the next. All ideas considered here appear, to me at least, to impact the learning enterprise in some way. Accordingly, this work looks at the present and the future through a lens that is predominantly, but far from entirely, a digital one. -JL

 

Opinions expressed, scooped, or copied in this Scoop.it topic are my own, or a result of my own judgment, and should in no way be understood to reflect those of my employer.

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Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:43 AM
Jim - I like your perspective. Great subject matter here!
Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:46 AM
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Azania Nduli-AmaZulu UbuntuPsychology.ORG's curator insight, July 8, 2013 6:24 PM

Beautiful!

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Learning By Thinking: How Reflection Improves Performance

Learning By Thinking: How Reflection Improves Performance | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"*Learning from direct experience can be more effective if coupled with reflection-that is, the intentional attempt to synthesize, abstract, and articulate the key lessons taught by experience.

 

*Reflecting on what has been learned makes experience more productive.

 

*Reflection builds one's confidence in the ability to achieve a goal (i.e., self-efficacy), which in turn translates into higher rates of learning."

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

Many of us already believe this; here it is confirmed by a Harvard Business School study. Full article may be downloaded here.

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Dr. Helen Teague's curator insight, June 25, 8:41 PM
Reflection supports scooped by Jim Lerman with this insight:  Many of us already believe this; here it is confirmed by a Harvard Business School study. Full article may be downloaded at this link: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2414478
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Out of High School, Into Real Life :: NY Times

Out of High School, Into Real Life :: NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Some 30 percent of this year’s three million graduating seniors will not go straight to college, a number that is ticking up as an improving economy draws more graduates directly to work. They go to Walmarts and to welding shops, restaurants, salons, hospitals and construction sites, to start careers on the tougher side of the vast economic and cultural divide that is demarcated by a college degree.

"Some — mostly boys, researchers say — will land high-paying jobs as welders, electricians, plumbers or air-conditioning technicians. But the number of higher-skilled jobs attainable with a high school diploma is eroding over the long term, replaced by low-skilled work, despite President Trump’s promises to champion blue-collar workers.

"This graduation season, The New York Times visited schools in rural Idaho, an industrial city in Indiana and California’s suburban Inland Empire to talk with seniors and their parents about their plans, hopes and dreams — and their decisions not to continue their education."

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The new power of collaboration

The new power of collaboration | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Howard Rheingold talks about the coming world of collaboration, participatory media and collective action -- and how Wikipedia is really an outgrowth of our natural human instinct to work as a group.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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A Model of Personal Learning (Take Two) By Stephen Downes

Presented at #LearningTechDay in Ghent, Belgium

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Massive List of #MOOC Providers Around The World

Massive List of #MOOC Providers Around The World | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Where to find MOOCs: The definitive guide to MOOC providers.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Oskar Almazan's curator insight, June 20, 3:01 AM
It’s been more than five years since online education got a massive boost when three free online courses, all taught by Stanford professors, launched in October 2011. Each of these courses has had over 100,000 students. Soon after that, Coursera, edX, and Udacity were launched and the media started calling the courses provided by these websites “MOOCs”: Massive Open Online Courses. Since then more than 700 universities around the world have launched free online courses. By the end of 2016, around 58 million students had signed up for at least one MOOC. Many countries around the world (e.g. India, Mexico, Thailand, Italy, and more) have launched their own country-specific MOOC platform.
 
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I'm Suing New York City to Loosen Verizon's Iron Grip

I'm Suing New York City to Loosen Verizon's Iron Grip | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Description by BackChannel

 

"Our brilliant tech policy columnist Susan Crawford this time makes news herself. Outraged at the arrangement between Verizon and New York City that has let the telecom giant hoard the essential information citizens need to move broadband forward, Susan has taken the matter to court. And she’s winning. Read her amazing account of this here and try not to get outraged."

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Garry Kasparov: "Deep Thinking" | Talks at Google

"Garry Kasparov and DeepMind’s CEO Demis Hassabis discuss Garry’s new book “Deep Thinking”, his match with Deep Blue and his thoughts on the future of AI in the world of chess."

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

Quite an interesting interview, covering numerous areas.

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How Googlers Avoid Burnout (and Secretly Boost Creativity)

How Googlers Avoid Burnout (and Secretly Boost Creativity) | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Burnout is undoubtedly one of Google’s gravest threats, and holding back passionate employees is often a far more formidable challenge than pushing them ahead. Fortunately, Google has brought the same innovative mindset to this dilemma as the company has to all its other projects. But unlike just about everything else that Google does, the company isn’t helping its employees rest by looking ahead to cutting-edge technologies. Rather, Google nails rest by looking back to an ancient Eastern practice.


Creativity and the Brain at Rest
It turns out that meditation and other restful practices don’t just help workers disconnect—they may boost innovation, too."

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4-Step Model for Productive, Whole-Brained Meetings

4-Step Model for Productive, Whole-Brained Meetings | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"To run effective meetings it is helpful to have insights into the personality types of your colleagues using a tool like, DISC, which you can access for free here, Myers Briggs which you can access for free here, and Neethling Brain Instrument (NBI).  

"This was the tool of choice at a recent workshop I attended led by Coaching Psychologist Yaron Prywes (@Yaron321) who specializes in innovation. He selected this tool, because unlike some of the others with many types this one has four basic personality types to focus on connected to left brain and right brain thinking. The test costs about $30 per person, but if that’s not in your budget, you can look at an overview of personality types from a resource such as this article from Success Reboot.

"If you want to quickly get a sense of the personality types of the people on your team, let them read the descriptions of each and have them determine those with which they most identify. The most high performing teams have a distribution of types, but it is important to note that most people have strengths in more than one quadrant, so even if one of the types is not their “most” dominant they may be able to pull from a quadrant that is close to it."

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The seven techniques of Learning to Learn

The seven techniques of Learning to Learn | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Learning should not be as hard as you think. There is a method to the art and just like any skill, learning to learn needs practice and mastery. It is much like speed reading. If you know how to read faster, you can end up reading more books in a given time. Similarly, if you learn how to learn efficiently you can spend less time doing the learning and more time enjoying what you have learned.

As a trainer, the topic of learning to learn is even more important since it is not only beneficial to you, but it also helps you to improve your training. As such, it is worth investing time in.

In this article, you will be introduced to seven highly effective techniques that help you maximise learning in a given time. The following methods are presented as if you are applying them to yourself, but you should consider how you can take advantage of them for your learners in a training environment.

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Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, May 19, 5:40 AM
Zeven toetsstenen om na te gaan of je in jouw klas leert leren. 
Andrea Mejia Medina's curator insight, May 23, 2:35 PM
A paper published in Psychological Science in the Public Interest evaluated some techniques for improving learning. Be aware that everyone thinks they have their own style of learning (they don't, according to the latest research), and the evidence suggests that just because a technique works or does not work for other people does not necessarily mean it will or won’t work well for you. If you want to know how to revise or learn most effectively you will still want to experiment on yourself a little with each technique. Elaborative Interrogation (Rating = moderate) A method involving creating explanations for why stated facts are true. The method involves concentrating on why questions rather than what questions and creating questions for yourself as you are working through a task. This is a good method because it is simple, so anyone can apply it easily. It does however require enough prior knowledge to enable you to generate good questions for yourself, so this method may be best for learners with experience in a subject. Self Explanation (Rating = moderate) A technique that is useful for abstract learning. The technique involves explaining and recording how one solves or understands problems as they work and giving reasons for choices that are made. This was found to be more effective if done while learning as opposed to after learning. Self explanation has been found to be effective with learners ranging from children in kindergarten to older students working on algebraic formulas and geometric theorems. Like elaborative explanation, self explanation benefits from its simplicity. Summarisation (Rating = low) An old staple, tested by having participants summarise every page of text in to a few short lines. Summarising and note taking were found to be beneficial for preparing for written exams but less useful for types of tests that do not require students to generate information – such as multiple choice tests. Highlighting and underlining (Rating = low) The runaway favourite technique of students was found to perform spectacularly poorly when done on its own under controlled conditions. It seems pretty intuitive that highlighting alone is ineffective for the same reasons it is so popular – it requires no training, it takes practically no additional time and crucially, it involves very little thought above the effort taken to simply read a piece of text. The keyword mnemonic (Rating = low) A technique for memorising information involving linking words to meanings through associations based on how a word sounds and creating imagery for specific words. Much research has found that mnemonics are useful for memorising information in the short term in a range of situations including learning foreign language, learning people’s names and occupations, learning scientific terms etc. However, it seems the keyword mnemonic is only effective in instances where keywords are important and the material includes keywords which are inherently easy to memorise. Imagery for Text Learning (Rating = low) Experiments asking students to simply imagine clear visual images as they are reading texts have found advantages when memorising sentences, but these advantages seem much less pronounced when longer pieces of text are involved. Interestingly, visualisation was found to be more effective when students listened to a text than when they read text themselves, implying the act of reading may make it harder to focus on visualizing. Rereading (Rating = low) Overall, rereading is found to be much less effective than other techniques – however the research has drawn some interesting conclusions. Massed rereading – rereading immediately after reading - has been found more effective than outlining and summarising for the same amount of time. It does seem however, that rereading spaced over a longer amount of time has a much stronger effect than massed rereading. Practice Testing (Rating = High) testing is often seen as a necessary evil of education. practice testing seems to result in benefits. Unlike many of the other techniques mentioned, the benefits of practice testing are not modest – studies have found that a practice test can double free recall! Research has found that though multiple choice testing is indeed effective, practice tests that require more detailed answers to be generated are more effective. Importantly, practice testing is effective when you create the questions yourself. Distributed Practice (Rating = High) if you want to remember something for a year you should study at least every month, if you want to remember something for five years you should space your learning every six to twelve months. If you want to remember something for a week you should space your learning 12-24 hours apart. It does seem however that the distributed-practice effect may work best when processing information deeply – so for best results you might want to try a distributed practice and self-testing combo. 

 So it is clear that we are all expected to be able to learn but currently we don’t ever really get taught how to learn. The trick is to experiment with different methods or techniques and to discover the ideal technique for us according to our needs and the one that suits our learning style, as we know there are techniques that can work for many people but for us they do not work as effectively as We expect it.
Sarah's curator insight, May 24, 6:19 PM
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These 7 Disruptive Technologies Could Be Worth Trillions of Dollars

These 7 Disruptive Technologies Could Be Worth Trillions of Dollars | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
In a new research report, released this week, ARK took a look at seven disruptive technologies, and put a number on just how tremendous they are. Here’s what they found.

(Check out ARK’s website and free report, “Big Ideas of 2017,” for more numbers, charts, and detail.)
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Mark Zuckerberg tells Harvard grads that automation will take jobs, and it’s up to millennials to create more

Mark Zuckerberg tells Harvard grads that automation will take jobs, and it’s up to millennials to create more | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
The Facebook executive said that it's time for this generation to define a "social contract" in the vein of the New Deal or the Great Society. In his remarks, Zuckerberg said that we should explore ideas such as universal basic income — the idea that everyone should receive a base salary — and explore ways to provide health care and childcare in ways that aren't tied to an employer.

He also acknowledged that this won't be cheap. "And yes, giving everyone the freedom to pursue purpose isn't free," he said. "People like me should pay for it. Many of you will do well and you should too."

Zuckerberg, 33, is the youngest person to deliver a Harvard commencement speech, according to Facebook — a fact that he wanted to highlight to the crowd. “We walked this yard less than a decade apart, we studied the same ideas and slept through the same lectures,” he said. “We may have taken different roads to get here — especially if you came all the way from the quad — but today I want to share what I've learned about our generation and the world we're building together.”

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Workshop: Maker Education in a Context

Presentation slides for my ISTE 2017 maker education workshop.

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

This is an extraordinarily rich and well-researched presentation by the one and only Dr. Jackie Gerstein. Do follow the links on many of the slides. They will take you to a goldmine of solid research.


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Dr. Helen Teague's curator insight, June 25, 8:26 PM
Jim Lerman's insight: This is an extraordinarily rich and well-researched presentation by the one and only Dr. Jackie Gerstein. Do follow the links on many of the slides. They will take you to a goldmine of solid research.
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Inspirations: A Short Film Celebrating the Mathematical Art of M.C. Escher

Inspirations: A Short Film Celebrating the Mathematical Art of M.C. Escher | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Almost two years ago, Spanish filmmaker Cristóbal Vila shot an exquisite little film, Nature by Numbers, which captured the ways in which mathematical concepts (Fibonacci Sequence, Golden Number, etc.) reveal themselves in nature.

Via Margarita Parra
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Margarita Parra's curator insight, February 24, 8:18 AM
"Although Escher had no formal training in mathematics beyond secondary school, many mathematicians counted themselves as admirers of his work."
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AL DíA: Online Interactive Tools

AL DíA: Online Interactive Tools | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"It has been suggested that the use of active learning instructional strategies, both in traditional face-to-face classrooms as well as online courses, enhances learning and results in better learning outcomes. . .[Online Interactive Activities include] multiple choice, "drag and drop" matching exercises, and video and traditional case discussions, as active learning strategies to reinforce course concepts. This study examines whether the inclusion of these activities significantly improved learning outcomes as measured by performance scores on two required exams. 

 

"The findings that emerged...online interactive tools used as an adjunct to a course can enhance student performance ...these types of online supplements hold promise for students who are not performing well in the course."

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Stephen Downes on a model of personal learning #learningtechday

Stephen Downes on a model of personal learning #learningtechday | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
STephen looks great while he takes the stage, and delivers an authentic, humorous talk with lots of ideas to reflect upon, whil

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Stephen Downes on #Connectivism

I describe how we set up the CCK08 course, talk about what the students added on, summarize the content of the course thus far, and outline the gRSShoppe

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Blended and Hybrid Environments are Driving the New Global Movement in Education

Blended and Hybrid Environments are Driving the New Global Movement in Education | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Today’s global employers are searching for employees that have specific skills. Those skills may not be the same needed in 10 years though. In 2009, the US Department of Labor estimated 65% of today’s school children would eventually be employed in jobs that have yet to be created. The number is far higher today. The influx of technology is what has changed the shape of education forever. For this reason, schools must create opportunities for students to engage in higher level thinking skills and experience 21st century skills while using technology.

Via Nik Peachey
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Nathalie Ferret's curator insight, June 23, 4:43 AM
Interesting graphic-rate and pertinent for life long learning context...Good to see also that "global/Multicultural Fluency" is consider as "essential need..."even though at last position...
Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, June 23, 8:40 AM
21st Century educational shifts to a blended / hybrid teaching and learning environments to support career readiness -kctestandtech.org
Gust MEES's curator insight, June 24, 11:41 AM

 

 

Today’s global employers are searching for employees that have specific skills. Those skills may not be the same needed in 10 years though. In 2009, the US Department of Labor estimated 65% of today’s school children would eventually be employed in jobs that have yet to be created. The number is far higher today. The influx of technology is what has changed the shape of education forever. For this reason, schools must create opportunities for students to engage in higher level thinking skills and experience 21st century skills while using technology.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Hybrid-Learning

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Blended+Learning...

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Hybrid+Pedagogy

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?tag=Critical-Thinking

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/05/26/what-are-the-skills-needed-from-students-in-the-future/

 

 

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Stepping Up: From fellowships to coaching, one teacher gets more involved

Stepping Up: From fellowships to coaching, one teacher gets more involved | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Christian Scott-Hills is a secondary English teacher at Brooklyn Center High school in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota. In this conversation with E4E-Minnesota Outreach Director Holly Anderson, Christian shares why she is passionate about teacher diversity and getting involved to bring changes for her students.
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New study reveals where low-income students are doing best - The Hechinger Report

New study reveals where low-income students are doing best - The Hechinger Report | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"The new index is designed to provide a standard way of comparing how effectively schools and districts are teaching low-income students, regardless of how many such students they enroll.

 

"Overall, the study confirmed that low-income students are still performing well below national averages.


"But the report identified a small group of cities that are getting more promising results for low-income students, and eight of the top 10 came from the Lone Star State. Almost all the cities were predominantly Latino, and only one – Mesquite – was more than 15 percent African-American. Brownsville, a city of 175,000 along the Mexican border where 94 percent of students receive free or reduced-price lunch, received the highest marks.

"By breaking down the results not only by city, but also by school, Douglass hopes to create a measurement that will be equally useful to policymakers looking for systemic solutions and to parents looking for schools for their kids.


"Though the top-performing cities in the report were generally mid-sized and concentrated in Texas, the majority of schools with the best results for low-income students were clustered in large cities like New York, Los Angeles and Chicago. In fact, eight cities account for half of the schools that reached “high above average” test scores for low-income students. New York City alone has 95 such schools."

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France is offering US scientists 4-year grants to move to the country and do research

France is offering US scientists 4-year grants to move to the country and do research | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Researchers, teachers, and students can apply for a four-year grant that allows them to continue their studies or instruction, fully financed. The site also provides information on how to move to France by obtaining a work visa and residency permit.

The website explains: “You will be able to stay in France at least for the duration of the grant, and longer if you are granted a permanent position. There is no restriction on your husband / wife working in France. If you have children, note that French public schools are free, and the tuition fees of universities and 'grandes écoles' are very low compared to the American system.”

Businesspeople and heads of NGOs can also apply to receive funding from the federal government, which issues grants to organizations it considers deserving.
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How to Use Storytelling to Communicate the Value of Your Brand

How to Use Storytelling to Communicate the Value of Your Brand | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Five ways businesses can combine high-quality content with current technology to grow their audience and expand their reach.

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

Brief, but unusually informative, article, with practical tips.

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Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.'s curator insight, June 19, 12:02 PM

Some very useful for information for leaders who are looking to polish, refine, or redefine their brand.

Victor Ventura's curator insight, June 20, 8:39 AM
There ma be something in this for educators.
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How Do Our Students Learn? An Outline of a Cognitive Psychological Model for Information Literacy Instruction | Cook | Reference & User Services Quarterly

How Do Our Students Learn? An Outline of a Cognitive Psychological Model for Information Literacy Instruction | Cook | Reference & User Services Quarterly | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Effective pedagogy requires understanding how students learn and tailoring our instruction accordingly. One key element of student-centered pedagogy involves understanding the cognitive psychological processes according to which students learn, and to structure our teaching with these processes in mind. This paper fills in a gap in the current literature, by applying empirically grounded lessons drawn from the cognitive science of learning, and discussing specific applications of these lessons for information literacy instruction. The paper outlines a framework for information literacy instruction, grounded in the educational and cognitive psychology literature, for facilitating student retention and transfer of information literacy skills, two classic measures of student learning. Five specific principles and several strategies for promoting retention and transfer within information literacy instruction are outlined. This article is an expansion of a presentation given at LOEX in May 2014.
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Stephania Savva, Ph.D's curator insight, June 18, 10:30 AM
A meaningful contribution in information literacy research, grounded in the educational and cognitive psychology literature. The article addresses a framework and its specific applications for information literacy instruction.
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Harnessing automation for a future that works

Harnessing automation for a future that works | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Automation is happening, and it will bring substantial benefits to businesses and economies worldwide, but it won’t arrive overnight. A new McKinsey Global Institute report finds realizing automation’s full potential requires people and technology to work hand in hand.

Recent developments in robotics, artificial intelligence, and machine learning have put us on the cusp of a new automation age. Robots and computers can not only perform a range of routine physical work activities better and more cheaply than humans, but they are also increasingly capable of accomplishing activities that include cognitive capabilities once considered too difficult to automate successfully, such as making tacit judgments, sensing emotion, or even driving. Automation will change the daily work activities of everyone, from miners and landscapers to commercial bankers, fashion designers, welders, and CEOs. But how quickly will these automation technologies become a reality in the workplace? And what will their impact be on employment and productivity in the global economy?

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The future is automated, but what does that really mean for jobs?

The future is automated, but what does that really mean for jobs? | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

The most recent major study on the topic found that, from 1990 to 2007, the penetration of industrial robots – defined as autonomous, automatically controlled, reprogrammable, and multipurpose machines – undermined both employment and wages.

Based on the study’s simulations, robots probably cost about 400,000 US jobs each year, many of them middle-income manufacturing jobs, especially in industries like automobiles, plastics, and pharmaceuticals. Of course, as a recent Economic Policy Institute report points out, these are not large numbers, relative to the overall size of the US labor market. But local job losses have had an impact: many of the most affected communities were in the Midwestern and southern states that voted for Trump, largely because of his protectionist, anti-trade promises.


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