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Window of Opportunity ~ Connected Principals

Window of Opportunity ~ Connected Principals | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Our window of opportunity to touch our students’ lives closes faster than we realize. Never let an opportunity to change a child’s life pass you by. I hope that we wind summer down we all start looking for those windows and can be that change for some student…socks be darned."

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Jim Lerman's curator insight, August 25, 2013 7:54 PM

A great story that has little to do with tech and education, but everything to do with what teachers and schools can do. It's definitely worth the 5 minutes it takes to read it.

:: The 4th Era ::
Exploration of the new era in human history marked by invention of the Internet
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Introducing this work

Introducing this work | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

For the purposes of this Scoop.it site, the history of human interaction with information may be divided into 4 eras. The first (spoken) era ended with the invention of writing around 3000-4000 BC. The second era ended with the invention of the printing press in 1440. The third era ended, and the fourth began, with the invention of the Internet (depending how one defines its operational beginning) somewhere between 1969 and 1982. We now exist early, but decidedly, in the fourth era.

 

All readers may not agree with this interpretation of the history of information, especially with the division and numbering of the eras. That is not the main point. Rather, it is that humankind is presently existing in an era distinctly different from the one that preceded it -- that in fact, this new era is accompanied with, and characterized by, a new - and quite different - information landscape. This new Internet information landscape will challenge, disrupt, and overpower the print-oriented one that came before it. It will not completely obliterate that which preceded it, but it will render it to a subsidiary, rather than primary, level of influence.

 

Just as the printing press altered humanity's relationship with information, thereby resulting in massive restructuring of political, religious, economic, social, educational, cultural, scientific, and other realms of life; so too will the advance of digital technology occasion analogous transformations in the corresponding universe of present and future human activity.

 

This site will concern itself primarily with how K-20 education in the US, and the people who comprise its constituencies, may be affected by this transformative movement from one era to the next. All ideas considered here appear, to me at least, to impact the learning enterprise in some way. Accordingly, this work looks at the present and the future through a lens that is predominantly, but far from entirely, a digital one. -JL

 

Opinions expressed, scooped, or copied in this Scoop.it topic are my own and should in no way be understood to reflect those of my employer.

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Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:43 AM
Jim - I like your perspective. Great subject matter here!
Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:46 AM
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Azania Nduli-AmaZulu UbuntuPsychology.ORG's curator insight, July 8, 2013 6:24 PM

Beautiful!

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Is Estonia the new Finland?

Is Estonia the new Finland? | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Most educators and policymakers can rattle off a list of international educational powerhouses: Korea. Singapore. Japan. Finland.

 

But there’s an overlooked member of the list: Estonia. Even as educators from around the world flock to Finland to discover its magic formula, Estonia, just a two-hour ferry ride away, has not aroused the same degree of interest.

 

That could change if the country remains on its upward trajectory. In 2012, Estonia’s 15-year-olds ranked 11th in math and reading and sixth in science out of the 65 countries that participated in an international test that compares educational systems from around the world, called the Programme for International Student Assessment, or PISA.

 

In addition to beating out western nations such as France and Germany and essentially tying Finland in math and science, Estonia also had the smallest number of weak performers in all of Europe, about 10 percent in math and reading and 5 percent in science."

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Interests-to-Internships: When Students Take the Lead in Learning

Interests-to-Internships: When Students Take the Lead in Learning | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
College and career readiness is a ubiquitous education catch-phrase, but in reality many high schools focus primarily on the “college” side of the equation. In part, that’s because research has shown that young adults who graduate with college degrees tend to have better job prospects and earning potential throughout their lives, and educators rightly want to ensure that all students are able to take advantage of those opportunities. But what about the kids who just aren’t interested in college? And, even if kids do want to go to college, what might be lost in the development of a whole person when teenagers are asked to focus solely on traditional academics?

Various school models have tried to integrate more hands-on learning into the traditional school day, including schools in the Big Picture Learning network. One such such school in Oakland, MetWest High School, aims to help high school students explore their passions outside of school and bring that learning and experience back into the academic setting. MetWest focuses on relationships, relevance and rigor, in that order.
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Artificial Intelligence’s White Guy Problem

Artificial Intelligence’s White Guy Problem | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
While machine-learning technology can offer unexpected insights and new forms of convenience, we must address the current implications for communities that have less power, for those who aren’t dominant in elite Silicon Valley circles.

Currently the loudest voices debating the potential dangers of superintelligence are affluent white men, and, perhaps for them, the biggest threat is the rise of an artificially intelligent apex predator.

But for those who already face marginalization or bias, the threats are here.
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Evolution of TV: Reaching Audiences Across Screens  ::  Think with Google

Evolution of TV: Reaching Audiences Across Screens  ::  Think with Google | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Part one of our Evolution of TV series, 7 Dynamics Transforming TV, introduced the increasing shift of TV to delivery over the internet. Here we dig into the first dynamic—reaching fragmented audiences spread across hundreds of screens and devices—and discuss the challenges and opportunities for distributors, programmers, and advertisers.
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Is there a youth offer?

Is there a youth offer? | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
In this week’s blog, Matthew Walsham from Partnership for Young London explores the issues around cohesive impact measurement for the sector and addresses the need for further support for young people transitioning into adulthood.
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Youth work from a British perspective. My,my, the policy language is so different from the U.S. -- actually seems rather opaque, at least to the uninitiated. Nevertheless, the current state of affairs, with both its similarities and differences, is quite interesting.

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Goodbye, Password. Banks Opt to Scan Fingers and Faces Instead.

Goodbye, Password. Banks Opt to Scan Fingers and Faces Instead. | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Some of the nation’s largest banks, acknowledging that traditional passwords are either too cumbersome or no longer secure, are increasingly using fingerprints, facial scans and other types of biometrics to safeguard accounts.

Millions of customers at Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase and Wells Fargo routinely use fingerprints to log into their bank accounts through their mobile phones. This feature, which some of the largest banks have introduced in the last few months, is enabling a huge share of American banking customers to verify their identities with biometrics. And millions more are expected to opt in as more phones incorporate fingerprint scans.

Other uses of biometrics are also coming online. Wells Fargo lets some customers scan their eyes with their mobile phones to log into corporate accounts and wire millions of dollars. Citigroup can help verify 800,000 of its credit card customers by their voices. USAA, which provides insurance and banking services to members of the military and their families, identifies some of its customers through their facial contours.
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Bad drivers are a good indicator of a corrupt government

Bad drivers are a good indicator of a corrupt government | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Traffic accidents kill 1.25 million people per year, and it’s well-known that those deaths are disproportionately in low- and middle-income countries. Over at CityMetric, writer James O’Malley has added an interesting wrinkle, by showing a correlation between the number of traffic fatalities in a country and the corruptness of its government."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 4, 8:52 AM

I love the last paragraph in this article because it echoes the "Broken Windows" theory--not at the neighborhood scale, but for the state.  Horrible driving isn't the worse thing for a country, but it is indicative of the degree of social trust in each other and in the collective system; corruption erodes both. 

 

"Bottom line: If you’re in a country where everyone drives on the sidewalk and nobody stops at stop signs, you can be pretty sure the government isn’t working right."

 

Tags: political, governancetransportation.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 10, 2:12 PM
Será?
Caitlyn Scott's curator insight, June 14, 1:05 AM
This article shows a scarily real insight into the effects of corruption on certain countries. Would be useful for situations where looking at the broad range of effects of corruption but also has some interesting statistics regarding earnings and road fatalities.
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Google’s futuristic touch fabric is coming to a real Levi’s jacket

Google’s futuristic touch fabric is coming to a real Levi’s jacket | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Jacquard, the touch-sensitive fabric technology is getting more real. ATAP had already partnered with Levi's to create clothing with the technology. But, Poupyrev says, "we are not making smart pants." Instead, it's the "Levi's commuter trucker jacket." You can touch the sleeve of your jacket while you're, say, biking, to control your phone. You can answer a phone call or block a phone call, and do a bit more, too. It will work with Spotify, Google Maps, Strava, and Google will release some APIs so other developers can use it. The touch-sensitive area is on the cuff, and in the on-stage demo it worked really well.

It comes out Spring 2017, with a beta test this fall.
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Lessons Learned from a Decade of Blogging :: Bill Ferriter

Lessons Learned from a Decade of Blogging :: Bill Ferriter | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
One of the things that blows my mind about being an educator in today's day and age is JUST how easy it is to find valuable resources and ideas.  Gone are the times when finding new lessons or materials was a time-consuming process of ripping through someone else's file cabinet or subscribing to Mailbox magazine.  Instead, great ideas are a few digital clicks through our Pinterest pages or Twitterstreams away.

But what many forget is that those great ideas aren't magically dropping out of the sky.  They are being shared by regular people just like you and I who are willingly giving away their best thinking in order to improve education.  The way I see it, if I am going to take from that well of shared knowledge, I have an obligation to give back.  Each post I write is my contribution.
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5 Questions That Promote Student Success in High-Poverty Schools

5 Questions That Promote Student Success in High-Poverty Schools | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Leaders in high-performing, high-poverty (HP/HP) schools know that success requires more than just high-quality teaching and learning. The entire school, as a system, should work together to develop a common instructional framework that provides a vision of what success looks like. When a ship loses its compass, getting to port becomes a game of chance. It's no different for a school. When a school, particularly one characterized by high poverty and low performance, lacks an instructional plan or framework, progress will be anything but systematic, and more than likely patterns of low performance will continue.

Through the collaborative efforts of the leaders and staff, HP/HP schools focus on three kinds of learning: student, professional, and system. These learning agendas influence each other, and leaders in HP/HP schools make the most of this connection to facilitate sustainable improvements in teaching and learning. Professional learning is the adult learning that takes place within a school, while system learning conveys how the school as a whole learns to be more effective. In other words, as people within the school learn, the system learns.
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38 Community Colleges Launch Entire Degree Programs With Open Educational Resources (EdSurge News)

38 Community Colleges Launch Entire Degree Programs With Open Educational Resources (EdSurge News) | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Today national community college reform network Achieving the Dream announced an initiative to remove some of the financial burdens that traditional educational resources place on students. Over the next three years, 38 community colleges in 13 states will build entire degree programs around open educational resources (OER). The goal of the “OER Degree Initiative” is not only to reduce financial burdens on students, but also to encourage faculty to teach in more engaging ways that encourage students to more actively participate in the use of OER.
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Colleges offer microgrants to help low-income students pay bills that can derail them - The Hechinger Report

Colleges offer microgrants to help low-income students pay bills that can derail them - The Hechinger Report | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"The idea, being tried at a growing number of colleges and universities, is simple: For low-income students, many of them minorities or the first in their families to go to college, surprisingly small financial shortfalls are often all that stands between them and their goals, according to Tim Renick, vice president for enrollment management and student success at Georgia State. Microgrants ranging from several hundred dollars to $2,000 can get them to the finish line.

Without such help, said Stacey Moore, associate provost for student success and retention at the University of Akron, “there is no other way for them to continue.”

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Schools exacerbate the growing achievement gap between rich and poor, a 33-country study finds - The Hechinger Report

Schools exacerbate the growing achievement gap between rich and poor, a 33-country study finds - The Hechinger Report | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
ntral to the American dream is the notion that any kid, even one from the poorest of backgrounds, can study hard, do well in school and make it in our society. But many of us fear that the schoolhouse is no longer a path to the middle class. That fear grows with the rising number of U.S. schoolchildren in poverty, and the growing achievement gap in school between them and their wealthier peers.
A recent study examined how much of the achievement gap in math between rich and poor 15-year-old students can be attributed to what material the kids are learning in school, and it found, across 33 countries, that schools are teaching rich kids vastly different math content than poor kids. The researchers calculated that this educational content difference accounts for a third of the achievement gap, on average. (The remainder of the achievement gap is explained by socio-economic factors at home, such as family income and parental education.)
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TeachThought: We grow teachers

TeachThought: We grow teachers | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

by Terry Heick

 

"There is no perfect lesson, unit, or school any more than their can be a perfect song, flavor, or shade of blue.

Every student is different. Every single intelligent, forgetful, smiling, moody, enthusiastic, apathetic, reflective, short-sighted little (or big) human being that walks into your classroom on a daily basis has their own story–one full of promise, heart-break, and complexity. And this isn’t hippie nonsense. It’s true, and it matters.

So when we talk about student-centered classrooms, that too is a kind of generalization–more of an approach than a strategy. There can’t be one “student-centered” reading strategy, for example. Maybe a “class-centered,” but if it’s truly “student-centered,” well then you’d have one for each student, yes?

But what is universal? In our collective effort to design learning experiences, schools, curriculum, technology, and all the other bits of education just right, is it possible that we miss some of the more obvious pieces? Pieces that every single student needs?

That can be added to everything–curriculum, frameworks, school design, instructional strategies, and anything else that touches the mind of students?

What does every single student need–absolutely, positively have to have–to succeed inside and outside of the classroom?"

Jim Lerman's insight:

A very well articulated statement...well worth reading and considering.

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The Maker Movement, Equity, and Schools: Researcher Q&A

The Maker Movement, Equity, and Schools: Researcher Q&A | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Public schools' embrace of the maker movement has prompted a sharp new focus on equity and diversity.

Among those looking at the issue most deeply are Northwestern University researcher Shirin Vossoughi, Meg Escudé of San Francisco's Exploratorium, and independent learning scientist Paula Hooper. The trio co-authored "Making Through the Lens of Culture and Power: Toward Transformative Visions for Educational Equity," an essay that will appear in the Summer 2016 issue of the Harvard Educational Review.

In general, "maker education" refers to hands-on activities that support academic learning, problem-solving, and a mindset that values experimentation, growth, and collaboration. The movement has historically been rooted outside of school, either in science museums such as the Exploratorium or in the informal crafting and building activities that everyday people have employed for generations.

This month, as part of our annual Technology Counts report, Education Week took a deep look at the opportunities and challenges associated with bringing making into K-12 schools. 

One of the most important dynamics associated with this shift, argue Vossoughi, Escudé, and Hooper, involves efforts to recognize and value the "histories, needs, assets, and experiences of working-class students and students of color."

The trio's essay is based largely on their work developing and studying the Tinkering Afterschool Program, a partnership between the Exploratorium and local Boys & Girls Clubs in low-income communities in the Bay Area. They argue that it's critical for educators embracing making to challenge educational injustices (to ensure that lower-resourced schools also have access to making technologies, for example), to recognize a multicultural mix of making activities (such as sewing and crafting, in addition to computer science and robotics), and to focus on good pedadogy (including direct assistance from teachers, which is anathema to some in the maker community.)

I caught up with Vossoughi, Escudé, and Hooper by phone to discuss these issues in April, prior to the annual conference of the American Educational Research Association. Following is a transcript of our conversation, edited for length and clarity.
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TXTBKS :: Thinking with Google

TXTBKS :: Thinking with Google | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
In developed countries, sleek tablets and e-readers have replaced large, heavy textbooks. In the Philippines, however, even the cheapest electronic models cost more than a family's monthly income. Smart, the country's largest telecom, wanted to make textbooks more accessible using the only gadget most Filipino families own: an analog mobile phone. The company turned these phones into low-tech e-readers for students in an initiative called TXTBKS, which was launched in four partner schools with around 800 students.
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Redesigning the Remote: How Online Video Changes the Way Viewers Tune In :: Think with Google

Redesigning the Remote: How Online Video Changes the Way Viewers Tune In :: Think with Google | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Thanks to mobile, online video is always on-demand—people can watch virtually anywhere, anytime, and on any screen. That means more opportunities to reach consumers. New research from Flamingo and Ipsos Connect uncovers how new video consumption habits can help you meet your audience.
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German startup Blinkist raises $4 million to help you read nonfiction books in 15 minutes or less

German startup Blinkist raises $4 million to help you read nonfiction books in 15 minutes or less | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Blinkist, a Germany-based startup that gives you the gist of well-known nonfiction books in 15 minutes or less, has raised €4 million ($4.3 million) to accelerate product development and expand in the U.S. and across Europe.

Founded out of Berlin in 2012, Blinkist hires subject-expert writers to condense popular nonfiction titles into abridged versions, with a catalog that includes titles like Richard Dawkins’ The Greatest Show on Earth and Barack Obama’s The Audacity of Hope. Available on the Web, Android and iOS, Blinkist gives users one book each day for free, beyond which they must pay $50 per year for unlimited access, or $80 per year to include audio incarnations.
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Pisa tests to include 'global skills' and cultural awareness

Pisa tests to include 'global skills' and cultural awareness | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Pisa tests, an international standard for comparing education systems around the world, could include a new measurement of global skills in the next round of tests in 2018. The OECD, which runs the tests in maths, reading and science, is considering adding another test which would look at how well pupils can navigate an increasingly diverse world, with an awareness of different cultures and beliefs. The OECD's education director Andreas Schleicher explains why there is such a need for new rankings to show young people's competence in a world where globalisation is a powerful economic, political and cultural force.

Education leaders around the world are increasingly talking about the need to teach 'global competences' as a way of addressing the challenges of globalisation."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 26, 7:18 PM

They define global competence as: "the capacity to analyse global and intercultural issues critically and from multiple perspectives, to understand how differences affect perceptions, judgements, and ideas of self and others, and to engage in open, appropriate and effective interactions with others from different backgrounds on the basis of a shared respect for human dignity".

 

So I guess geography does matter then.  Who knew? 

 

Tagsgeography education, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

Dafnord 's curator insight, June 2, 1:23 AM
Kansainvälistyminen nousee uudeksi mitattavaksi asiaksi PISA-tutkimuksissa 2018. Miten mahtaa suomalaisten peruskoulujen käydä? Pystyvätkö ne globaalitaidoissa ja kulttuurienvälisessa osaamisessa yltämään samalle tasolle kuin kansainvälistymisessä pitkälle edistyneet Britannia, Hollanti, Belgia tai Tanska. Oma kokemukseni jo 10 vuotta jatkuneesta Intia-yhteistyöstä (http://www.eumind.net) ei ennakoi Suomen kouluille huipputuloksia. Mutta toivotaan parasta.
Jaume Busquets's curator insight, June 4, 7:41 AM
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The birth of virtual reality as an art form

The birth of virtual reality as an art form | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Chris Milk uses innovative technologies to make personal, interactive, human stories. Accompanied by Joshua Roman on cello and McKenzie Stubbert on piano, Milk traces his relationship to music and art — from the first moment he remembers putting on headphones to his current work creating breakthrough virtual reality projects. VR is the last medium for storytelling, he says, because it closes the gap between audience and storyteller. To illustrate, he brought the TED audience together in the world's largest collective VR experience. Join them and take part in this interactive talk by getting a Google Cardboard and downloading the experience at with.in/TED.

 

Recorded Feb. 2016

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Introducing Google’s Tilt Brush an amazing New Innovative Technology for Artists

Introducing Google’s Tilt Brush an amazing New Innovative Technology for Artists | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
The next level of art is with the Google’s Tilt Brush wherein the user can turn the surroundings into a canvas to paint. Tilt Brush lets you paint in 3D space

Via TechinBiz, TomRain
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Lots of Talk, Little Action for Academic Advising and Planning Technology (EdSurge News)

Lots of Talk, Little Action for Academic Advising and Planning Technology (EdSurge News) | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Academic advisors play a critical role in helping students stay the course to graduation, but budget cuts and enrollment increases have made these individuals harder to access for many students. While 82 percent of colleges and universities report that student retention and success are part of their strategic plan, only one in five believe their institution achieves an “ideal advising situation.”

These numbers are the result of the first annual survey on academic advising and planning in higher education from Tyton Partners, a Boston-based consulting group. “We see a big disconnect between institutions' aspirations and ability to execute against that,” says Gates Bryant, a partner at Tyton.
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UX to LX: The Rise of Learner Experience Design (EdSurge News)

UX to LX: The Rise of Learner Experience Design (EdSurge News) | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
The term “user experience” or “UX” wasn’t always an overused Silicon Valley buzzword. Coined in the mid ‘90s by Don Norman, while he was vice president of advanced technology at Apple, it refers to an abstract way to describe the relationship between a product and a human. Back then, Norman argued that technology must evolve to put user needs first—the opposite of how things were done at the time. It wasn’t until 2005 that UX gained mainstream relevance: 42 million iPods were sold that year and the mass market experienced great design at scale.

Not long after, run-of-the-mill software engineers—once in high demand—weren’t as competitive in the job market. Job descriptions and expectations shifted from putting information online to tailoring the online experience to the needs of end users. The field of User Experience Design was born. Today, it is among the country’s fastest growing job categories.

Instructional design is now approaching a similar transition. Most student consumers have yet to experience great learning design, but the commoditization of online learning is forcing colleges and universities to think differently about how they construct digital courses. Courseware is enabling the development of new modalities and pedagogical shifts. An abundance of data now enables instructional designers to decode learning patterns. As a result, we are witnessing the growth of a new field: Learner Experience Design.

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Coding Bootcamp Market to Grow by 74% in 2016 (EdSurge News)

Coding Bootcamp Market to Grow by 74% in 2016 (EdSurge News) | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

via EdSurge

"FULL STEAM AHEAD: Aspiring programmers have plenty of options to hone their coding skills, and these opportunities continue to grow. The latest data from coding bootcamp review site Course Report is out, and it indicates that the market for these accelerating learning programs is doing some acceleration."

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Looking beyond Fisher v. University of Texas

Looking beyond Fisher v. University of Texas | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
As Reuters reports, plaintiff Abigail Fisher had argued that she was rejected in favor of "lesser-qualified" candidates of color in violation of her constitutional right to equal protection under the law. In his opinion, however, Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote that "it remains an enduring challenge to our nation's education system to reconcile the pursuit of diversity with the constitutional promise of equal treatment and dignity," adding that UT-Austin's attempts to boost racial diversity in race-neutral ways had been unsuccessful. 

Race-based affirmative action programs are not the only admissions policies that have an impact on the racial composition of student bodies. Legacy admissions benefit more white families because, going just a few generations back, many colleges only accepted white students. Preferences for athletes, too, benefit more white students than any other race. And in both cases, these white students are disproportionately from higher income families.

Richard Kahlenberg, a senior fellow at the Century Foundation, cites foundation research that found colleges were able to get similar results as affirmative action by using non-race-based measures, including getting rid of legacy preferences, paying attention to class, and beefing up transfer pipelines. But there’s a catch.

“There is a way to get racial diversity without affirmative action,” Kahlenberg said at a recent education conference. “It just costs more money.” 
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