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Q&A: Learning by Design, A Conversation with Drew Davidson | Spotlight on Digital Media and Learning

Q&A: Learning by Design, A Conversation with Drew Davidson | Spotlight on Digital Media and Learning | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Drew Davidson is a professor, producer, and player of interactive media. He is the acting director of the Entertainment Technology Center at Carnegie Mellon University, and the founding editor of ETC Press and its Well Played Series and Journal. Davidson helped lead a team of designers to create the Chicago Public Library’s YOUmedia, a digital space for teens that is now being replicated across the country.

 

This is part of a series of conversations with thought leaders on digital media and learning, then and now. In conversation with journalist Heather Chaplin, leaders reflect on how the field of digital media and learning has changed over time, and where it’s headed"

 

- See more at: http://spotlight.macfound.org/featured-stories/entry/qa-learning-by-design-a-conversation-with-drew-davidson/#sthash.9Vo9TkJb.dpuf

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:: The 4th Era ::
Exploration of the new era in human history marked by invention of the Internet
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Introducing this work

Introducing this work | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

For the purposes of this Scoop.it site, the history of human interaction with information may be divided into 4 eras. The first (spoken) era ended with the invention of writing around 3000-4000 BC. The second era ended with the invention of the printing press in 1440. The third era ended, and the fourth began, with the invention of the Internet (depending how one defines its operational beginning) somewhere between 1969 and 1982. We now exist early, but decidedly, in the fourth era.

 

All readers may not agree with this interpretation of the history of information, especially with the division and numbering of the eras. That is not the main point. Rather, it is that humankind is presently existing in an era distinctly different from the one that preceded it -- that in fact, this new era is accompanied with, and characterized by, a new - and quite different - information landscape. This new Internet information landscape will challenge, disrupt, and overpower the print-oriented one that came before it. It will not completely obliterate that which preceded it, but it will render it to a subsidiary, rather than primary, level of influence.

 

Just as the printing press altered humanity's relationship with information, thereby resulting in massive restructuring of political, religious, economic, social, educational, cultural, scientific, and other realms of life; so too will the Internet occasion analogous transformations in the corresponding universe of present and future human activity.

 

This site will concern itself primarily with how K-20 education in the US, and the people who comprise its constituencies, may be affected by this transformative movement from one era to the next. All ideas considered here appear, to me at least, to impact the learning enterprise in some way. Accordingly, this work looks at the present and the future through a lens that is predominantly, but far from entirely, a digital one. -JL


Opinions expressed, scooped, or copied in this Scoop.it topic are my own and should in no way be understood to reflect those of my employer.

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Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:43 AM
Jim - I like your perspective. Great subject matter here!
Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:46 AM
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Azania Nduli-AmaZulu UbuntuPsychology.ORG's curator insight, July 8, 2013 6:24 PM

Beautiful!

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American Schools Are Training Kids for a World That Doesn’t Exist :: David Edwards

American Schools Are Training Kids for a World That Doesn’t Exist :: David Edwards | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"We “learn,” and after this we “do.” We go to school and then we go to work.

"This approach does not map very well to personal and professional success in America today. Learning and doing have become inseparable in the face of conditions that invite us to discover....


"Against this arresting background, an exciting new kind of learning is taking place in America. Alternatively framed as maker classes, after-school innovation programs, and innovation prizes, these programs are frequently not framed as learning at all. Discovery environments are showing up as culture and entertainment, from online experiences to contemporary art installations and new kinds of culture labs. Perhaps inevitably, the process of discovery — from our confrontation with challenging ambiguous data, through our imaginative responses, to our iterative and error-prone paths of data synthesis and resolution — has turned into a focus of public fascination.

"Against this arresting background, an exciting new kind of learning is taking place in America.


"Discovery has always provoked interest, buthow one discovers may today interest us even more. Educators, artists, designers, museum curators, scientists, engineers, entertainment designers and others are creatively responding to this new reality, and, together, they are redefining what it means to learn in America."

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, February 9, 7:20 AM

The world of tomorrow is not yesterday's world. How do we create visionaries to resolve issues we never saw coming?

Dennis Swender's curator insight, February 9, 9:57 AM

Specifically adding to the "others" category of "educators, artists, designers..." are chefs - particularly master chefs under the age of 12 who are creating meals worthy of 5-star eating establishments.

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Your Next New Best Friend Might Be a Robot - Issue 33: Attraction - Nautilus :: Yongdong Wang

Your Next New Best Friend Might Be a Robot - Issue 33: Attraction - Nautilus :: Yongdong Wang | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
The result is the rise of a framework we call “emotional computing,” that recognizes that relationships are more profound than task completion. While the primary purpose of a doctor, for example, is to treat a patient’s illness, the relationship between doctor and patient is not confined to that task. It also involves trust, dependability, and sensitivity. A productive conversation between doctor and patient will not be the concise, clipped exchange of a traditional conversation system. It will be filled with something personal, touching, and amazing: A balance of analytical intelligence (measured by IQ) and emotional intelligence (measured by EQ). For that reason, we have both software engineers and psychological experts on the Xiaoice team.

Through the tens of billions of conversations she’s had over the past 18 months, Xiaoice has added considerably to her store of known conversational scenarios, and improved her ability to rank answer candidates. Today, 26 percent of the data in Xiaoice’s core chat software derives from her own conversations with humans, and 51 percent of common human conversations are covered by her known scenarios. We can now claim that Xiaoice has entered a self-learning and self- growing loop. She is only going to get better.
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Five Everyday Activities That Hurt Your Memory :: Stephanie Vozza

Five Everyday Activities That Hurt Your Memory :: Stephanie Vozza | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
You can’t find your phone. You don’t remember if you answered your client’s email. And you forgot the question you wanted to ask your colleague when you bump into her in the hallway.

If you’re feeling a little forgetful lately, it might be due to something you’re doing during the day. Turns out there are several surprising and common activities people do that hurt their memory. Do you do any of these five things?
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NMC Releases Strategic Brief Exploring the Potential for Course Apps to Transform Teaching and Learning

NMC Releases Strategic Brief Exploring the Potential for Course Apps to Transform Teaching and Learning | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"The NMC has released Course Apps: An NMC Horizon Project Strategic Brief at the EDUCAUSE Annual Conference. Commissioned by Adobe Systems, the report explores the emergence of new forms of instructional resources, known informally as “course apps” — special mobile applications with functionalities that promise to redefine the category.

"The report looks at the evolution of the key features of course apps — mobility, interactivity, engaging design, and integrated analytics — and showcases how course apps are sparking new thinking in higher education about the next iteration of digital learning resources. In analyzing the progress in these areas, the NMC has identified a need for innovators in the education space to create more robust technological tools that not only push the boundaries of what is possible, but also redefine them. Course apps have the potential to generate more excitement around learning for students, especially as it relates to breathing new life into instructional materials.

“While course apps are relatively new territory, we see them as opportunities to spark more engaged and immersive learning,” said Larry Johnson, chief executive officer of the NMC. “We encourage thought leaders to watch this space as digital instructional materials are ripe for innovation. Adobe has definitely taken a leadership position in this arena.”

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Four tough things universities should do to rein in costs :: Steven Pearlstein

Four tough things universities should do to rein in costs :: Steven Pearlstein | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Universities in the United States are the best in the world, but the cost of attending them is rising faster than the cost of almost anything else. Professors blame administrative bloat, administrators blame a decline in state funding, politicians blame unproductive faculties who’ve become too set in their ways.

"Yet while students are paying more, they are getting less, at least as measured by learning outcomes, intellectual engagement, time with professors and graduation rates. And although students are working more hours at outside jobs and receiving more tuition assistance, student debt now exceeds credit card debt and has become something of a national obsession.

"So you would expect universities to have embarked on the fundamental restructuring that nearly every other sector has done to reduce costs and improve quality. They haven’t. Oh, yes, pay and hiring have been frozen, travel budgets cut, secretaries eliminated and class sizes increased, even as cheaper graduate students and adjunct professors have been hired to teach more. Everything has been done that can be done — except changing the traditions, rhythms and prerogatives of academic life...."


"A university concerned about cost and quality would restructure general education around a limited number of courses designed specifically for that purpose — classes that tackle big, interesting questions from a variety of disciplines. Harvard, with its Humanities 10 seminars, and the University of Maryland, with its I-Series, have recently taken steps in that direction. But this approach will achieve significant savings only if the courses are designed to use new technology that allows large numbers of students to take them at the same time.


"I’m not talking about simply videotaping lectures. I’m talking about combining great talks by one or more professors and outside experts with video clips, animation, quizzes, games and interactive exercises — then supplementing that online material with weekly in-person sessions for discussions, problem solving or other forms of “active learning.” And having “labs” open day and night that use tutors and interactive software to provide individualized instruction in math and writing until the desired competency is achieved.


"There is plenty of evidence that using technology in this way boosts course completion rates, improves learning retention and increases student engagement, while reducing per-student costs by an average of 30 to 40 percent, according to Carol Twigg, who has helped design many such pilot courses. Yet despite these successes, Twigg said that almost none of these models have been rolled out campus-wide. At this point, more than three-quarters of students at four-year colleges and universities have never taken an online or hybrid course, the government reports."

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Appalachian Miners Are Learning to Code :: Tim Loh

Appalachian Miners Are Learning to Code :: Tim Loh | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Jim Ratliff worked for 14 years in the mines of eastern Kentucky, drilling holes and blasting dynamite to expose the coal that has powered Appalachian life for more than a century.


"Today, he rolls into an office at 8 a.m., settles into a small metal desk and does something that, until last year, was completely foreign to him: computer coding.


“A lot of people look at us coal miners as uneducated,” said Ratliff, a 38-year-old with a thin goatee and thick arms. “It’s backbreaking work, but there’s engineers and very sophisticated equipment. You work hard and efficiently and that translates right into coding.”

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7 Lessons About Making Micro Credentials Work in Education Prof. Devt. (EdSurge News)

7 Lessons About Making Micro Credentials Work in Education Prof. Devt. (EdSurge News) | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Description by EdSurge:

"The Friday Institute for Educational Innovation at North Carolina State University has experimented a fair amount with micro-credentials and teacher professional development, asking questions like: Do teachers actually like these things? What’s the best way to demonstrate a competency? The Institute’s Lauren Acree shares answers to these questions and five more from her team’s fruitful micro-credential trials."


Jim Lerman's insight: This brief article summarizes some quite important research.

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Epic Country-Level A/B Test Proves Open Is Better Than Closed :: Alec Ross

Epic Country-Level A/B Test Proves Open Is Better Than Closed - Backchannel - Medium

"Rarely do countries and societies have the opportunity to make a simple, binary choice about whether they are going to be open or closed. But that is exactly what happened after the dissolution of the Soviet Union and the reestablished independence of Estonia and Belarus. The two countries are separated by just a few hundred kilometers west of Russia, but their trajectories could not be more different.


"Estonia is “The Little Country That Could,” the title of a book by the first prime minister of Estonia, Mart Laar, which explained the country’s rise from ruin at the end of Soviet occupation in 1991 to become one of the most innovative societies in the world today."

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Brazil Gives Out Books That Double as Subway Tickets, Promoting Literacy & Mass Transit at Once | Open Culture

Brazil Gives Out Books That Double as Subway Tickets, Promoting Literacy & Mass Transit at Once | Open Culture | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

One of the things I miss about living in a city with a subway system is the myriad thoughtful design elements that go into managing a perpetual flow of tourists and commuters. New York’s subway map presents us with an iconic tangle of interlocking tributaries resembling diagrams of a circulatory system. The NYC system’s ingeniously simple graphic presentation of lettered and numbered trains, encircled in their corresponding colors, can be read by most anyone with a rudimentary grasp on the English alphabet—from a new language learner to a small child. The Washington, DC subway system, though a much more prosaic affair overall, whisks riders through impressively cavernous, catacomb-like stations, with brutalist tile and concrete honeycombs that seem to go on forever. The squiggly lines of its color-coded map likewise promise ease of use and legibility.

 

And then there are the hours of reading time granted by a subway commute, a leisure I’ve relinquished now that I rely on car and bike. So you can imagine my envious delight in learning about Brazil’s Ticket Books, which are exactly what they sound like—books that work as subway tickets, designed with the minimalist care that major transit systems do so well. And what’s more, they’re free: “To celebrate World Book Day last April 23rd,” writes “future-forward online resource” PSFK, “[Brazillian publisher] L&PM gave away 10,000 books for free at subway stations across São Paulo. Each book came with ten free trips.” Riders could then recharge them and use the books again or pass them on to others to encourage more reading, an important public service given that Brazilians only read two books per year on average.

 

Click headline to read more, access hot links and watch video clip--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc, Luciana Viter, Jim Lerman
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Sara Rosett's curator insight, February 5, 9:49 AM

Sara's thoughts: Love this idea! #Multi-tasking. It's a book and a ticket! 

#tw

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High school student develops 3D printed ring to monitor Parkinson's disease symptoms

High school student develops 3D printed ring to monitor Parkinson's disease symptoms | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
In 1996, world famous boxer Muhammad Ali was chosen to light the Olympic torch at the Atlanta Olympic games despite his suffering of Parkinsons disease. The moment was a historic one and to one young boy, who viewed the ceremony on Youtube years after it occurred, it was the ultimate inspiration. Utkarsh Tandon, the young boy who drew inspiration from Muhammad Ali, is now a high school student at Cupertino High School in California who has developed a 3D printed ring that is capable of monitoring Parkinson’s patients’ tremors and translating them into data accessible through an iOS app.
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MIT Dean Takes Leave to Start New University Without Lectures or Classrooms :: Jeffrey R. Young

MIT Dean Takes Leave to Start New University Without Lectures or Classrooms  :: Jeffrey R. Young | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Christine Ortiz is taking a leave from her prestigious post as a professor and dean at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to start a radical, new nonprofit university that she says will have no majors, no lectures, and no classrooms.


"Many details about the new university are still undetermined, she says, but the basic idea is to answer the question, What if you could start a university from scratch for today’s needs and with today’s technology?


"The plan is to begin with a campus in the Boston area that she hopes will grow to about 10,000 students and 1,000 faculty members — about the size of MIT. And her long-term plan is to add more campuses in other cities as well."

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, February 2, 8:40 PM

Thanks to Jim Lerman. 

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Little Separates Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton in Tight Race in Iowa :: NY Times :: Patrick Healy

Little Separates Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton in Tight Race in Iowa :: NY Times :: Patrick Healy | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Hillary Clinton and Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont were locked in an intensely tight race in the Iowa caucuses on Monday as Mrs. Clinton’s strong support among women and older voters was matched by the passionate liberal foot soldiers whom Mr. Sanders has been calling to political revolution.


"The close results were deeply unnerving to Mrs. Clinton and her husband, former President Bill Clinton, as well as her advisers, some of whom had expressed growing confidence in recent days that they had recaptured political momentum after weeks when Mr. Sanders was drawing huge crowds and rising in the polls. The Clintons had appeared optimistic at rallies over the weekend, thanking Iowans for their support as much as urging them to turn out to vote.

"The close vote means that Mrs. Clinton and Mr. Sanders are likely to split Iowa’s share of delegates to the Democratic convention, and Mr. Sanders will be able to argue that the Iowa result was a virtual tie.

"The Clinton team was counting on its huge, well-trained army of volunteers, covering all of Iowa’s 1,681 voting precincts, to counter the enormous enthusiasm of voters who jammed into events to hear Mr. Sanders. But his well-financed Iowa organization was able to convert the energy of his crowds into voters on Monday night, as he drew huge numbers of first-time caucusgoers, young people and liberals who responded to his rallying cry against the nation’s “rigged economy.”

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Wood Shop Enters the Age of High-Tech :: NY Times :: John Schwartz

Wood Shop Enters the Age of High-Tech :: NY Times :: John Schwartz | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
These days, tinkering is a bit more high tech. The blending of technology and craft in tools like 3-D printers and laser cutters has made it possible for ordinary people to make extraordinary things. And many ordinary people, living as they do, more and more in their heads and online, are yearning to do something with their hands.

So the “maker space” movement — D.I.Y. communities to get people creating, be it for fun, for art or for entrepreneurship — is booming. Maker Faires are held around the world. Commercial operations like TechShop have popped up across the country. And tinkering is being promoted on college campuses from M.I.T. to Santa Clara University, as well as in high schools and elementary schools.
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An Appetite for Innovation - Issue 28: 2050 - Nautilus "How Ideas Will Shape the Future" :: David Edward

An Appetite for Innovation - Issue 28: 2050 - Nautilus "How Ideas Will Shape the Future" :: David Edward | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"How many Harvard professors have you heard of who have their own restaurant, much less one with a gastronomy manifesto? Once you get to know David Edwards, a biomedical engineer and specialist in sensorial design and delivery, the restaurant comes as no surprise. Called Café ArtScience, it lets users try novel foods like vapor chocolate cake and frozen sweets delivered in edible skins, made with instruments straight from the science lab. Besides being delicious and playful, the menus reflect Edwards’ broader perspective on the world: A writer, inventor, and entrepreneur, he thinks that most of the problems we face today are problems of innovation.

"Innovation is something of a mantra for Edwards. His Harvard course, “How to create things & have them matter,” teaches students about “ideas, how we imagine them, and especially how we continually reimagine them.” His students often meet next door to ArtScience, at Le Laboratoire, a center for art, design, and learning, which he founded. Edwards originally opened it in Paris, before moving it to near MIT, in the heart of biotech start-up country.

"Together, the spaces form what Edwards sees as public culture lab, bringing different disciplines together. He champions the transdisciplinary ethos, experimental learning in the arts and sciences, and young innovators. These ideas are the subject of much of his published writing, including the book, Artscience: Creativity in the post-Google Generation.

"Edwards sat down with Nautilus this past May at Café ArtScience in Cambridge, Massachusetts to discuss his perspective, not just on the future of food, but on the type of innovation he thinks our future requires."

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Driving the Skills Agenda: Preparing Students for the Future

From the Executive Summary:


" The Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) embarked on a research programme, sponsored by Google, to examine to what extent the skills taught in education systems around the world are changing. For example, are so-called 21st-century skills, such as leadership, digital literacy, problem solving and communication, complementing traditional skills such as reading, writing and arithmetic? And do they meet the needs of employers and society more widely?"

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NMC and EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative Release the NMC Horizon Report > 2016 Higher Ed Edition

NMC and EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative Release the NMC Horizon Report > 2016 Higher Ed Edition | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"The New Media Consortium (NMC) and EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI) are jointly releasing the NMC Horizon Report > 2016 Higher Education Edition at the 2016 ELI Annual Meeting. This 13th edition describes annual findings from the NMC Horizon Project, an ongoing research project designed to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on learning, teaching, and creative inquiry in higher education.

"The report identifies six key trends, six significant challenges, and six important developments in educational technology across three adoption horizons spanning over the next one to five years, giving campus leaders, educational technologists, and faculty a valuable guide for strategic technology planning. The report provides higher education leaders with in-depth insight into how trends and challenges are accelerating and impeding the adoption of educational technology, along with their implications for policy, leadership, and practice."

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This Makerspace Brings STEM Students Together to Hack Wheelchairs | Make:

This Makerspace Brings STEM Students Together to Hack Wheelchairs | Make: | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"The Maker movement attracts people of all disciplines into a world where they can create, make, or customize. At 505access, we are working to cultivate individual self-reliance and community empowerment in the Land of Enchantment (aka New Mexico) through accessibility technologies. To realize this aspiration, we are connecting and collaborating with local makerspaces, non-profits, and state organizations.


"In partnership with a local organization for the homeless and near-homeless, our wheelchair clinics provided free basic care and maintenance along with modifications of wheeled mobility devices. Don’t be stuck with humdrum, factory issue “one-size-fits-all” – customizations can range from functional to whimsical!"

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How a 3-D Printer May Have Changed the Outcome of Super Bowl 50 :: David Pierce

How a 3-D Printer May Have Changed the Outcome of Super Bowl 50 :: David Pierce | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

A FEW MINUTES after the Carolina Panthers punched their ticket to Super Bowl 50 with a blowout win over the Arizona Cardinals, reporters asked stud linebacker Thomas Davis how his arm was feeling. “Yeah, it’s broken,” he replied. He’d run into Arizona tight end Daniel Fells, who jumped and kneed Davis in the right forearm. “It hurt,” he said, laughing, “that’s all I can tell you.” That was two weeks ago...."


"Desperate to play, Davis and the Panthers started exploring their options. On the morning of Wednesday, Jan. 27, they called Whiteclouds, a 3-D printing outfit in Utah. “Someone knew someone who knew us,” says company CEO Jerry Ropelato, as if he’s still unsure exactly how it happened. The Panthers had two questions: Can you make Davis a brace he can wear during the game? And can you do it, like, yesterday?"

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In the U.S., a Growing Recognition: College Isn't for Everyone :: Lauren Camera

In the U.S., a Growing Recognition: College Isn't for Everyone :: Lauren Camera | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"The GED Testing Service recently decided to lower the passing score for its high school equivalency exam, making thousands of students newly eligible for a GED credential.


"The decision to change the passing score – from 150 to 145 – wasn’t entirely surprising. In 2014, the service overhauled the test to better align to the Common Core State Standards, a set of challenging academic benchmarks representing what students should know by the time they finish each grade, including by the time they graduate high school.


"As was widely advertised, the test became more difficult, and fewer students passed – a lot fewer, in fact. The passing rate for the 223,000 students who took the GED exams in 2014 – the first year in which the revised test was administered – was 62.8 percent, down from nearly 76 percent in 2013.

"Most education policy experts say the GED Testing Service was right to drop its passing score. After all, they say, passing simply equates to earning a high school degree, and doesn’t necessarily mean those who do are prepared for college-level work.

“It’s not meant to indicate that a child is ready to succeed in college because a high school diploma doesn’t mean a child is ready for college,” says Michael Petrilli, president of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, a conservative-leaning education think tank.

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Are Low Income Families Connecting to the Internet? Yes, but Not Easily, Survey Finds. (EdSurge News) :: Blake Montgomery

Are Low Income Families Connecting to the Internet? Yes, but Not Easily, Survey Finds. (EdSurge News) :: Blake Montgomery | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Communities and districts across America lack basic Internet connections. According to nonprofit EducationSuperHighway’s "State of the States" report, 23 percent of American school districts don’t meet the 100 kbps standards. Those districts contain 21 million students. What can be done?
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The Day One Flint Mother Told Me The Story Of How America Poisoned Her Baby Girl :: Michael Skolnik

The Day One Flint Mother Told Me The Story Of How America Poisoned Her Baby Girl - Life Tips. - Medium
The crazy part of this story is that none of this ever had to happen. But in 2014, an inadequate Republican Governor, who is still in power today, tried to cut costs and Flint’s entire water supply was poisoned. Lead poison. Because the pipes were and continue to be the cause of the devastating poison and not the actual water, the only solution is replace all of the piping. Billions of dollars in cost and no one has given a realistic timeline for new pipes. So for now, the only option is bottles and filters. But the problem is the filters and the bottled water arrived just a few weeks ago, while the the government failed to tell the people they were being poisoned for over a year. Allegations of a cover-up. Damage done. Serious damage. Real destruction to the lives of the 99,763 Flint residents.
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Ikea to explore on-site 3D printer repair/recycle stations in new pilot program

Ikea to explore on-site 3D printer repair/recycle stations in new pilot program | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
If you’re one of those makers who is actively looking around the house for problems that can be fixed with your 3D printer, you will have probably noticed that Ikea furniture is particularly easy to combine with 3D printed components. In fact, you can also find quite a few making hacks online specifically intended for Ikea furniture, such as this 3D printed stool hack. It seems like the Swedish flat pack giant has finally picked up on this concept, as they are launching a series of pilot programs in Belgium and France where customers can bring broken furniture to Ikea repair stations for recycling or fixing with the help of a 3D printer.
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Big Data Threat Landscape — ENISA

Big Data Threat Landscape — ENISA | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
This Threat Landscape and Good Practice Guide for Big Data provides an overview of the current state of security in the Big Data area. In particular, it identifies Big Data assets, analyses exposure of these assets to threats, lists threat agents, takes into account published vulnerabilities and risks, and points to emerging good practices and new researches in the field. To this aim, ongoing community-driven efforts and publicly available information have been taken into account.


Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Big+Data...



Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, February 3, 12:04 PM
This Threat Landscape and Good Practice Guide for Big Data provides an overview of the current state of security in the Big Data area. In particular, it identifies Big Data assets, analyses exposure of these assets to threats, lists threat agents, takes into account published vulnerabilities and risks, and points to emerging good practices and new researches in the field. To this aim, ongoing community-driven efforts and publicly available information have been taken into account.


Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Big+Data...


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Teaching With YouTube: 197 Digital Channels For Learning

Teaching With YouTube: 197 Digital Channels For Learning | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Teaching With YouTube: 197 Digital Channels For Learning

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Orientacion IES HRL's curator insight, February 5, 3:49 AM

 

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Mariana Melissa Ceballos's curator insight, February 5, 9:32 AM

añada su visión ...

Jorge Jaramillo's curator insight, February 5, 10:42 AM
Alternativas de selección de material educativo para la planeación de actividades de aprendizaje. Esta es una excelente alternativa, buscando conectar a los estudiantes en el conocimiento.
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Fury Shakes the Iowa Caucuses, Boosting Ted Cruz While Slowing Hillary Clinton :: NY Times :: Michael Barbaro

Fury Shakes the Iowa Caucuses, Boosting Ted Cruz While Slowing Hillary Clinton :: NY Times :: Michael Barbaro | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Fury carried Ted Cruz to victory. And it stopped Hillary Clinton from truly claiming one.

The vote here in Iowa was a portrait of red-hot America, so disaffected that it turned to a pugilistic evangelical Republican who calls for demolition of a system saturated with corruption. And it sent a forceful message to Democratic leaders that it was unwilling to put aside its resentment of Wall Street and corporate America to crown a lifelong party insider who has amassed millions in speaking fees from the big banks.

Monday night’s results confirmed that despite the widening cultural and political fissures that have divided right and left, voters are united in an impatience, even a revulsion, at what they see as a rigged system that no longer works for them.

For Republicans, the enemy is an overreaching government, strangling their freedoms and pocketbooks. For Democrats, it is an unfair economy, shrinking their paychecks and aspirations.
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