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Disrupting College - Michael Horn video | EDUCAUSE.edu

Disrupting College - Michael Horn video | EDUCAUSE.edu | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

From the website

 

"In his remarks, Michael Horn will discuss how disruptive innovations—known more broadly as online learning—are emerging with the promise to make postsecondary education more affordable, accessible, and of higher quality to students across the world. He will analyze what these trends may mean for the future of higher education and a variety of institutions, as well as how they may shift the policy landscape."

 

Video of Nov. 7, 2012 presentation at Educause. Requires Microsoft Silverlight to play. Silverlight may be downloaded from the site by clicking on the title of this Scoop or the image above.

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Impact of the internet age on human culture and education policy/administration
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Introducing this work

Introducing this work | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

For the purposes of this Scoop.it site, the history of human interaction with information may be divided into 4 eras. The first (spoken) era ended with the invention of writing around 3000-4000 BC. The second era ended with the invention of the printing press in 1440. The third era ended, and the fourth began, with the invention of the Internet (depending how one defines its operational beginning) somewhere between 1969 and 1982. We now exist early, but decidedly, in the fourth era.

 

All readers may not agree with this interpretation of the history of information, especially with the division and numbering of the eras. That is not the main point. Rather, it is that humankind is presently existing in an era distinctly different from the one that preceded it -- that in fact, this new era is accompanied with, and characterized by, a new - and quite different - information landscape. This new Internet information landscape will challenge, disrupt, and overpower the print-oriented one that came before it. It will not completely obliterate that which preceded it, but it will render it to a subsidiary, rather than primary, level of influence.

 

Just as the printing press altered humanity's relationship with information, thereby resulting in massive restructuring of political, religious, economic, social, educational, cultural, scientific, and other realms of life; so too will the advance of digital technology occasion analogous transformations in the corresponding universe of present and future human activity.

 

This site will concern itself primarily with how K-20 education in the US, and the people who comprise its constituencies, may be affected by this transformative movement from one era to the next. All ideas considered here appear, to me at least, to impact the learning enterprise in some way. Accordingly, this work looks at the present and the future through a lens that is predominantly, but far from entirely, a digital one. -JL

 

Opinions expressed, scooped, or copied in this Scoop.it topic are my own, or a result of my own judgment, and should in no way be understood to reflect those of my employer.

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Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:43 AM
Jim - I like your perspective. Great subject matter here!
Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:46 AM
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Azania Nduli-AmaZulu UbuntuPsychology.ORG's curator insight, July 8, 2013 6:24 PM

Beautiful!

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10 Ways Edtech Tools Can Facilitate the Teaching and Learning Process

10 Ways Edtech Tools Can Facilitate the Teaching and Learning Process | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
For many education professionals, the thought of implementing technology into the classroom can often be a worry. Not wanting to offer learners new distractions that will hinder their progress, teachers are wary of using education technology. However, if implemented in the right way, technology can be used as a tool to facilitate both teaching and learning inside and outside of the classroom. Here are ten ways that education technology can be used for both you and your students. 1) Shift the Focus in the Classroom Traditionally, focus in the classroom is directed at the teacher, usually placed front and center. …
Via Ines Bieler
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Top 10 Free Augmented reality apps you need to try right now - KnowStartup

Top 10 Free Augmented reality apps you need to try right now - KnowStartup | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
The world is changing very rapidly with emerging technology almost every day. The future of mobile technology closely revolves around two words: “augmented reality” (AR). AR in simple terms means an advanced and unseen version of what we can see with our naked eyes.

A regular sight when perceived through our smartphone infused with the AR technology will be enhanced through the use of computer-generated sensory input such as sound, video, graphics and GPS data.
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Enrique Facundo Ruiz Blanco's curator insight, Today, 9:33 AM

Aplicaciones de realidad aumentada que pueden ser útiles en el aula.

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What if jobs are not the solution but the problem? – James Livingston | Aeon Essays

What if jobs are not the solution but the problem? – James Livingston | Aeon Essays | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Caution: This article expresses some unconventional ideas and uses language that would not be considered acceptable in polite circles. -JL

 

"Work means everything to us Americans. For centuries – since, say, 1650 – we’ve believed that it builds character (punctuality, initiative, honesty, self-discipline, and so forth). We’ve also believed that the market in labour, where we go to find work, has been relatively efficient in allocating opportunities and incomes. And we’ve believed that, even if it sucks, a job gives meaning, purpose and structure to our everyday lives – at any rate, we’re pretty sure that it gets us out of bed, pays the bills, makes us feel responsible, and keeps us away from daytime TV.

"These beliefs are no longer plausible. In fact, they’ve become ridiculous, because there’s not enough work to go around, and what there is of it won’t pay the bills – unless of course you’ve landed a job as a drug dealer or a Wall Street banker, becoming a gangster either way.

"These days, everybody from Left to Right – from the economist Dean Baker to the social scientist Arthur C Brooks, from Bernie Sanders to Donald Trump – addresses this breakdown of the labour market by advocating ‘full employment’, as if having a job is self-evidently a good thing, no matter how dangerous, demanding or demeaning it is. But ‘full employment’ is not the way to restore our faith in hard work, or in playing by the rules, or in whatever else sounds good. The official unemployment rate in the United States is already below 6 per cent, which is pretty close to what economists used to call ‘full employment’, but income inequality hasn’t changed a bit. Shitty jobs for everyone won’t solve any social problems we now face.

"Don’t take my word for it, look at the numbers. Already a fourth of the adults actually employed in the US are paid wages lower than would lift them above the official poverty line – and so a fifth of American children live in poverty. Almost half of employed adults in this country are eligible for food stamps (most of those who are eligible don’t apply). The market in labour has broken down, along with most others."


Via Wildcat2030, Miloš Bajčetić, Ines Bieler
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prgnewshawaii's curator insight, August 20, 1:50 AM

A fascinating and sobering look at what the job market really is, stripped of all the government hype and rhetoric. The article contends that our conception of work as a way of giving meaning and purpose to our lives,"is no longer plausible." Most of the jobs now available won't elevate your life and are clearly inadequate to meet the demands of a modern, digitally-oriented society. Many of us are doomed to work at low paying jobs that offer no fulfillment or ways to advance socially.  A brutal look at what's really happening in the real world.

Russell Roberts

Hawaii Intelligence Digest

https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com

David Stapleton's curator insight, August 21, 8:58 PM
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Science doesn’t explain tech’s diversity problem — history does

Science doesn’t explain tech’s diversity problem — history does | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"...attrition for women is much higher than it is for men in STEM fields — and much more pronouncedly so when it comes to tech. Forty-one percent of women leave tech companies after 10 years of experience, as opposed to 17 percent of men who leave.

“Reducing female attrition by one-quarter would add 220,000 people to the highly qualified [science, engineering, and technology] labor pool,” says a 2008 Harvard Business Review research report.

"The technology industry is bleeding experienced workers in a time when labor — particularly experienced labor — is more needed than ever. The primary reason for midcareer attrition is that women feel stalled in their careers: they are promoted too slowly, or aren’t able to navigate a transition into management.

THE ABSENCE OF WOMEN IN TECHNOLOGY IS A SELF-PERPETUATING PROBLEM

 

"Part of the reason is that women in technology aren’t able to tap into the same social connections that men can. Some studies have labeled this “good old boy culture” as shorthand; other studies have simply called it “unfairness.” At its most benign, “good old boy culture” will merely slow a woman’s career trajectory, but at its worst, women experience intimidation, hostility, and harassment.

"At some point, the absence of women in technology becomes a self-perpetuating problem. Because women leave, there are few senior women. Without preexisting networks of senior women to mentor junior women, careers stall at a critical midpoint, and the women leave. When looking in from the outside, many young women see a field dominated by men, and choose not to enter at all to begin with."

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STEM Workforce Numbers

STEM Workforce Numbers | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

We've all heard the STEM pipeline leak metaphor. I wanted to see what a graphic representation of it might look like. This is the best visualization I could find. It documents that the High School Class of 2005 started off with 4,012,770 students as 9th graders (in 2001)  in the US (presumably in public schools only). It ended with 166,530 STEM graduates 10 years later, in 2011. This allowed the students 10 years to complete 8 years of schooling.

 

The yield rate using these numbers is 4.15%. 

 

Lately there has been a lot of criticism of the words used to described this phenomenon as a "leaky pipeline." One reason given is that some number of students choose other professions such as journalism, health care, or policy/politics to put their STEM education to work (Margaret Thatcher and Angela Merkel were both STEM graduates).

 

In addition, there are the now well-known patterns of discrimination against women and people of color and the economic hardships experienced by low-income students throughout their academic careers...all contributing to non-completion of STEM degrees.

 

I will leave it to other forums to debate the semantics of this difficult problem as well as what policy and practice steps might generate a substantial increase in the 4.15% rate. Nevertheless, it's pretty sobering to see how low this number is and the startling amount of lost human potential it represents.

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World Science U

World Science U | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"The World Science Foundation, a New York-based nonprofit organization most well known for the annual World Science Festival, offers World Science U, a series of multimedia educational resources that may appeal to science and mathematics teachers and students. World Science U consists of three components: Science Unplugged, Master Classes, and Courses. Science Unplugged offers a series of video clips that explain scientific and mathematical concepts in just a minute or two. Hosted by World Science Festival founder Brian Greene, topics of these videos include the Higgs particle, Schrodinger's cat, and string theory. Next, Master Classes features online courses headed by a variety of science experts. These classes integrate recorded lectures, interactive quizzes, animation, and more. These Master Classes are designed to be accessible for "everyone from high school students to lifelong learners." Finally, the Courses section features two longer courses hosted by Greene, designed to be completed over the course of several weeks. One of these courses addresses Special Relativity, the other is entitled "Space, Time, and Einstein." To access these materials, users will need to complete a free registration."

 

Via The Scout Report

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This Tap Dancer Needs a Kidney—And He's Asking You to Help

This Tap Dancer Needs a Kidney—And He's Asking You to Help | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"At 18, Baakari Wilder was flying high. The tap dance kid, who began lessons at 3 in a community center in Laurel, Maryland, was dancing every night on Broadway as part of the hand-selected cast of the George C. Wolfe/Savion Glover vehicle Bring in 'da Noise, Bring in 'da Funk. But in the middle of one show, he came off stage so out of breath the stage manager sent him to the hospital. "I didn't wake back up until months later," he wrote recently. "After leaving the hospital, I recall seeing my fellow dancers promoting Noise/Funk on Jay Leno. That was my motivation. I was determined to dance again. Months later I rejoined the cast on Broadway and when Savion left the show, I assumed the lead until it closed."


"Wilder has Lupus, an autoimmune disease that, in his case, has targeted his kidneys. Last week, he opened the Facebook page "Wanted: A Kidney for Baakari," where he tells this story. Back when he was 28, his brother donated a kidney, "And I sure enough felt the difference." Now 40, Wilder is hoping another donor will come forward as his kidney is failing again."

Jim Lerman's insight:

I know Baakari and he is a wonderful person. If you have a way to help him, please do...even if it is simply sharing this message. Thank you.

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Bullies, trolls, and the troll tax | Real talk with Mozilla

Bullies, trolls, and the troll tax | Real talk with Mozilla | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"We talked with DeRay McKesson and Lauren Duca about bullies, the troll tax and what it takes to have a more inclusive world and Web."

---

 "Imagine a walk home from school filled with fear because of a bully. Now imagine your bully is online — and this bully, a troll, can get to you any time of day. You'll find trolls in every corner of the Internet spreading discord, fabricating stories and taunting people, often from anonymous vantage points. But some people are fighting back in new...ways."

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

Quite a well done article...informative and with numerous helpful links.

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First robotic cop joins Dubai police

First robotic cop joins Dubai police | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Dubai police have enrolled a robotic officer, the first in a unit that aims to make up a quarter of the force by 2030.

 

Via Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D.
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Michel Charvolin's curator insight, August 16, 12:40 AM
http://worldtransferonline.blogspot.com/ Get a better deal for your international money exchange
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Movers shakers & policy makers - Carol Dweck, author, professor of psychology | #GrowthMindset #ModernEDU

Movers shakers & policy makers - Carol Dweck, author, professor of psychology | #GrowthMindset #ModernEDU | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
What would you say are a few of the biggest myths about growth mindset?

OK, myth No.1 is the myth that it’s all about effort, and that you instil it by praising effort. Effort is one factor that leads to learning. So the ultimate value is growth, progress, learning. And effort is one thing that leads there but there are many other things – strategies, using resources, getting advice, guidance and mentorship, and when people leave that out and just praise effort, it’s not transmitting a growth mindset. Adults have nagged children for centuries to try harder. That’s not a growth mindset, it’s an adult nagging a child to try harder!

Also, we find that when teachers think it’s just about effort and praising effort they may praise effort that isn’t even there, or that’s not effective. So if a child tries hard at something and you say ‘great job, you tried hard’, but they didn’t make progress, they didn’t advance, you’re actually conveying a fixed mindset because you’re saying ‘great effort, I didn’t really expect you to do that, and I don’t expect you to do that, so I’m trying to make you feel good about not doing it’. So we need people to understand that it’s appreciating a variety of process variables that lead to learning.

The second myth is that you can teach students a lesson on growth mindset and put a poster up in the front of the room, and that’s that, that they will have a growth mindset from then on. And we know if the teacher doesn’t then embody a growth mindset, if teachers don’t embody growth mindsets in their teaching practices, in the way that they give feedback when the child is stuck, and the way they present a new unit, in the way that they give opportunities for revision and growth of understanding – if they don’t embody that growth mindset, they are not teaching it. And in fact, if their behaviour contradicts the poster at the front of the room, then maybe they’re doing a disservice.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=carol+dweck

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Growth+Mindset

 


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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, August 14, 1:41 PM
Carol Dweck outlines several myths about the pychology of a growth mindset.
Ian Berry's curator insight, August 14, 7:15 PM
Great reminders of several aspects what I call appreciative leadership.  "Effort is one factor that leads to learning. So the ultimate value is growth, progress, learning. And effort is one thing that leads there but there are many other things – strategies, using resources, getting advice, guidance and mentorship, and when people leave that out and just praise effort, it’s not transmitting a growth mindset."
Chris Carter's curator insight, August 14, 7:31 PM
Carol Dweck gave words and concrete research to the belief that kids can succeed, that hard work matters, and that being "smart" has more to do with focus and determination than genes. 
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A leading Silicon Valley engineer explains why every tech worker needs a humanities education

A leading Silicon Valley engineer explains why every tech worker needs a humanities education | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
In 2005, the late writer David Foster Wallace delivered a now-famous commencement address. It starts with the story of the fish in water, who spend their lives not even knowing what water is. They are naively unaware of the ocean that permits their existence, and the currents that carry them. The most important educatio

Via David W. Deeds, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Ivon Prefontaine, PhD
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, July 15, 6:28 PM

This is interesting! 

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, July 17, 1:38 PM
Hans-Georg Gadamer wrote about eloquent questions, which are questions without pre-determined answers that structure dialogue between people. That is at the core of this article. A humanities education lifts us up and we find we can experience our environment more fully. We no longer have to be the fish out of water to realize we are out of water.
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How Smartphones Are Making Kids Unhappy

How Smartphones Are Making Kids Unhappy | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"iGen (the generation of young people born between 1995 and 2012) is showing mental health issues across a wide variety of indicators. They're more likely than young people just five or 10 years ago to say that they're anxious, that they have symptoms of depression, that they have thought about suicide or have even [attempted] suicide. So across the board, there's a really consistent trend with mental health issues increasing among teens."


Via WEAC, Ivon Prefontaine, PhD, Jim Lerman
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, August 9, 2:24 PM
This is an interesting and provocative article using research to support its claims.
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TIM :: Technology Integration Matrix

TIM :: Technology Integration Matrix | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"What is the Technology Integration Matrix?

The Technology Integration Matrix (TIM) provides a framework for describing and targeting the use of technology to enhance learning. The TIM incorporates five interdependent characteristics of meaningful learning environments: active, collaborative, constructive, authentic, and goal-directed. These characteristics are associated with five levels of technology integration: entry, adoption, adaptation, infusion, and transformation. Together, the the five characteristics of meaningful learning environments and five levels of technology integration create a matrix of 25 cells. Developed by the Florida Center for Instructional Technology (FCIT), the TIM is in its second version."

 

"What is in each cell?

Each cell (the intersection of a characteristic and a level) is described with a summary indicator, detailed indicators for student, teacher, and learning environment, and multiple lesson videos.

 

"How should the Technology Integration Matrix be used?

The TIM is designed to assist schools, districts, and states in evaluating the level of technology integration in classrooms and to provide teachers with models of how technology can be integrated into instruction in meaningful ways. The TIM can be used in the context of comprehensive technology planning, grant evaluation, and program accountability. Check out our Professional Learning page for more information about how you can use the TIM."

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

The first version of the TIM, produced by the Florida Center for Instructional Technology, was a terrific aid when first introduced a number of years ago. This second edition is superb. It provides scores of examples and explanations about how to use tech in the learning process, based on each of the 25 cells in the matrix.

This is a wonderful resource for instructional planning and professional development, as well as self-study.

 

Via @Ana Cristina Pratas

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This is exactly how society kills our creativity – in a breathtaking short film

This is exactly how society kills our creativity – in a breathtaking short film | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
There’s an aching difference between an adult and the child the adult once was. When I was a small child I wanted to be a…

Via John Evans, Jim Lerman
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Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.'s curator insight, August 20, 2:23 PM

Well, yes. But this suggests that somehow "society" is a nameless, faceless thing. Every human being is a part of society so how we encourage creativity, how we choose to be who we are, how we support those who are not the same as us and who add beauty to our lives makes a difference in how "society" influence what others think and do.

Mark Cottee's curator insight, August 20, 7:14 PM
Been around for awhile but I seemed to have missed it. 
hayley peluchette's curator insight, August 21, 10:45 AM

Everyone should take 2 minutes to watch this beautiful, brilliant short to remind us why we do the jobs we do! 

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How To Become An Education Entrepreneur: The Top 5 Voices You Need To Follow

How To Become An Education Entrepreneur: The Top 5 Voices You Need To Follow | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Edupreneurs are educational entrepreneurs who design, develop and operate educational services. They also work within innovative spaces outside the classroom. If you want to get into edtech or become an edupreneur, you must understand the field. These top five leaders can give you an inside look.
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City Will Move Sidelined Teachers From Limbo to Classrooms :: NY Times

City Will Move Sidelined Teachers From Limbo to Classrooms :: NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
For a dozen years, hundreds of New York City teachers have been paid despite not having permanent jobs, sidelined in most cases because of disciplinary problems or bad teaching records or because they had worked in poorly performing schools that were closed or where enrollment declined.

This limbo was largely the result of a deal that the Bloomberg administration struck with the teachers’ union to give principals more control over who worked in their schools. Under the deal, teachers could not simply be fired, so they were put in a pool known as the Absent Teacher Reserve.

But now, saying the city cannot afford expenditures like the $150 million it spent on salaries and benefits for those in the reserve in the last school year, the education department plans to place roughly 400 teachers in classrooms full time, possibly permanently. They will be placed in schools that still have jobs unfilled by mid-October. Principals will have little, if any, say in the placements. Neither will the teachers.

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Best Education Podcasts 2017 :: Edutopia

Best Education Podcasts 2017 :: Edutopia | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Podcasting is on the rise in terms of both popularity and creativity. According to Edison Research, 40 percent of people age 12 or older have listened to at least one podcast, up from 29 percent five years ago. And since Edutopia last reviewed the K–12 podcast landscape, many excellent new podcasts have launched. As the medium continues to evolve, producers are upping their game—making their offerings more enjoyable to listen to with better editing, offering searchable web resources, or using social media to engage with their listeners directly.

These are some of the best podcasts we’ve come across in surveying the field.
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The Edvocate’s 2017 EdTech 20: A Ranking of 20 Global Edtech Influencers

The Edvocate’s 2017 EdTech 20: A Ranking of 20 Global Edtech Influencers | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Who are the biggest edtech influencers in the world? The Edvocate editorial team has exhaustively researched the movers and shakers of edtech and selected 20 global influencers. To frame our methodology, we decided to define edtech influencer broadly. On this list, you will find administrators, bloggers, journalists, policymakers, researchers, innovators, businessmen, activists, etc. who are transforming the edtech space as we know it.

"The influencers that we chose are all active in the area of edtech, doing something influential in 2017, well-known throughout the edtech landscape, and making an impact globally. We are excited to witness how these influencers continue to change the world this year, and we are anxious to see who will stand on the shoulders of these giants, and as a result, make our list next year. Without further ado, here is The Edvocate’s 2017 EdTech 20: A Ranking of 20 Global Edtech Influencers."

Jim Lerman's insight:

Inspiring pieces about 20 remarkable educators!

 

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Opinion | How to Make Fun of Nazis :: NY Times

Opinion | How to Make Fun of Nazis :: NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

For decades, Wunsiedel, a German town near the Czech border, has struggled with a parade of unwanted visitors. It was the original burial place of one of Adolf Hitler’s deputies, a man named Rudolf Hess. And every year, to residents’ chagrin, neo-Nazis marched to his grave site. The town had staged counterdemonstrations to dissuade these pilgrims. In 2011 it had exhumed Hess’s body and even removed his grave stone. But undeterred, the neo-Nazis returned. So in 2014, the town tried a different tactic: humorous subversion.

"The campaign, called Rechts Gegen Rechts — the Right Against the Right — turned the march into Germany’s “most involuntary walkathon.” For every meter the neo-Nazis marched, local residents and businesses pledged to donate 10 euros (then equivalent to about $12.50) to a program that helps people leave right-wing extremist groups, called EXIT Deutschland.

"They turned the march into a mock sporting event. Someone stenciled onto the street “start,” a halfway mark and a finish line, as if it were a race. Colorful signs with silly slogans festooned the route. “If only the Führer knew!” read one. “Mein Mampf!” (my munch) read another that hung over a table of bananas. A sign at the end of the route thanked the marchers for their contribution to the anti-Nazi cause — €10,000 (close to $12,000). And someone showered the marchers with rainbow confetti at the finish line.

"The approach has spread to several other German towns and one in Sweden (where it was billed as Nazis Against Nazis).

"This week, following the violence in Charlottesville, Va., Wunsiedel has come back into the news. Experts in nonviolent protest say it could serve as a model for Americans alarmed by the resurgent white supremacist movement who are looking for an effective way to respond (and who might otherwise be tempted to meet violence with violence). Those I spoke with appreciated the sentiment of the antifa, or anti-fascist, demonstrators who showed up in Charlottesville, members of an anti-racist group with militant and anarchist roots who are willing to fight people they consider fascists. “I would want to punch a Nazi in the nose, too,” Maria Stephan, a program director at the United States Institute of Peace, told me. “But there’s a difference between a therapeutic and strategic response.”

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Honoring Our Friend Bassel: Announcing the Bassel Khartabil Free Culture Fellowship – The Mozilla Blog

Honoring Our Friend Bassel: Announcing the Bassel Khartabil Free Culture Fellowship – The Mozilla Blog | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"On August 1, 2017, we received the heartbreaking news that our friend Bassel (Safadi) Khartabil, detained since 2012, was executed by the Syrian government shortly after his 2015 disappearance. Khartabil was a Palestinian Syrian open internet activist, a free culture hero, and an important member of our community. Our thoughts are with Bassel’s family, now and always.

"Today we’re announcing the Bassel Khartabil Free Culture Fellowship to honor his legacy and lasting impact on the open web.


"Bassel was a relentless advocate for free speech, free culture, and democracy. He was the cofounder of Syria’s first hackerspace, Aiki Lab, Creative Commons’ Syrian project lead, and a prolific open source contributor, from Firefox to Wikipedia. Bassel’s final project, relaunched as #NEWPALMYRA, entailed building free and open 3D models of the ancient Syrian city of Palmyra. In his work as a computer engineer, educator, artist, musician, cultural heritage researcher, and thought leader, Bassel modeled a more open world, impacting lives globally.

"To honor that legacy, the Bassel Khartabil Free Culture Fellowship will support outstanding individuals developing the culture of their communities under adverse circumstances. The Fellowship — organized by Creative Commons, Mozilla, the Wikimedia Foundation, the Jimmy Wales Foundation, #NEWPALMAYRA, and others — will launch with a three-year commitment to promote values like open culture, radical sharing, free knowledge, remix, collaboration, courage, optimism, and humanity."

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5 robots that are about to revolutionize the workforce — and put jobs at risk

5 robots that are about to revolutionize the workforce — and put jobs at risk | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

According to a study from Oxford University and the Oxford Martin School, 47% of jobs in the United States are "at risk" of becoming "automated in the next 20 years." PwC has similar findings, estimating that 38% of U.S. jobs are at risk of being replaced by robots and artificial intelligence in the next 15 years. And while two-thirds of Americans believe robots will take over most of the workforce in the next 50 years, they're also in denial: 80% say their job will "probably" or "definitely" be around in five decades. 


 Here are five robots that are coming to take some jobs from unsuspecting humans:

 

Via Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D.
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, August 15, 10:43 AM

Is your job at risk? Find out in this fascinating Fast Company article.

Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, August 15, 11:02 AM

#Technology, and especially #Robotica, are putting jobs at risk. Major #disruption danger?

CCI VAL D'OISE's curator insight, August 16, 3:23 PM

Is your job at risk? Find out in this fascinating Fast Company article.

Rescooped by Jim Lerman from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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Video: Watch John Hattie's Keynote On Collaborative Impact - VISIBLE LEARNING | #ModernEDU

Video: Watch John Hattie's Keynote On Collaborative Impact - VISIBLE LEARNING | #ModernEDU | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Professor John Hattie gave a keynote presentation on “Collaborative Impact” in front of school leaders and principals at Cognition Education’s “Collaborative Impact: Research & Practice Conference 2017”. Watch the video to get some important updates on the Visible Learning story. 

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=John+HATTIE

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=modern-education

 


Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, August 11, 12:00 PM

Professor John Hattie gave a keynote presentation on “Collaborative Impact” in front of school leaders and principals at Cognition Education’s “Collaborative Impact: Research & Practice Conference 2017”. Watch the video to get some important updates on the Visible Learning story. 

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=John+HATTIE

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=modern-education

 

Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Educational Leadership and Technology
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How Education Must Change: Seeking Mission And Purpose In The Jobless Economy

How Education Must Change:  Seeking Mission And Purpose In The Jobless Economy | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
To prepare society for the dramatic changes underway due to technology, education must change. One capability essential for the future-- and absent from most formal education-- is the ability to select and pursue mission and purpose.

Via Stephania Savva, Ph.D, malek, steve batchelder, Roger Francis, Bobby Dillard, Ivon Prefontaine, PhD
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, July 18, 1:06 PM
This might take us back to the etymology of school: a place of leisure and conversation. We have to be careful we are not feeding the next chapter of the neo-liberal agenda and discourse.
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A New, More Rigorous Study Confirms: The More You Use Facebook, the Worse You Feel

A New, More Rigorous Study Confirms: The More You Use Facebook, the Worse You Feel | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"The average Facebook user spends almost an hour on the site every day. While we know that old-fashioned social interaction is healthy, what about social interaction that is completely mediated through an electronic screen? Prior research has shown that social media use may detract from face-to-face relationships and erode self-esteem through unfavorable social comparison. But those studies didn’t always look at longitudinal data or account for a person’s baseline sociability or Facebook use; a new study does. Using three waves of data from 5,208 adults, coupled with several different measures of Facebook usage, allowed researchers to see how well-being changed over time in association with Facebook use. The results showed that, while real-world social networks were positively associated with overall well-being, the use of Facebook was negatively associated with overall well-being. These results were particularly strong for mental health; most measures of Facebook use in one year predicted a decrease in mental health in a later year."

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A New Kind of Classroom: No Grades, No Failing, No Hurry

A New Kind of Classroom: No Grades, No Failing, No Hurry | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Few middle schoolers are as clued in to their mathematical strengths and weakness as Moheeb Kaied. Now a seventh grader at Brooklyn’s Middle School 442, he can easily rattle off his computational profile.

“Let’s see,” he said one morning this spring. “I can find the area and perimeter of a polygon. I can solve mathematical and real-world problems using a coordinate plane. I still need to get better at dividing multiple-digit numbers, which means I should probably practice that more.”

Moheeb is part of a new program that is challenging the way teachers and students think about academic accomplishments, and his school is one of hundreds that have done away with traditional letter grades inside their classrooms. At M.S. 442, students are encouraged to focus instead on mastering a set of grade-level skills, like writing a scientific hypothesis or identifying themes in a story, moving to the next set of skills when they have demonstrated that they are ready. In these schools, there is no such thing as a C or a D for a lazily written term paper. There is no failing. The only goal is to learn the material, sooner or later.

For struggling students, there is ample time to practice until they get it. For those who grasp concepts quickly, there is the opportunity to swiftly move ahead. The strategy looks different from classroom to classroom, as does the material that students must master. But in general, students work at their own pace through worksheets, online lessons and in small group discussions with teachers. They get frequent updates on skills they have learned and those they need to acquire.

Mastery-based learning, also known as proficiency-based or competency-based learning, is taking hold across the country. Vermont and Maine have passed laws requiring school districts to phase in the system. New Hampshire is adopting it, too, and piloting a statewide method of assessment that would replace most standardized tests. Ten school districts in Illinois, including Chicago’s, are testing the approach. In 2015, the Idaho State Legislature approved 19 incubator programs to explore the practice.
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, August 14, 1:22 PM
Etymologically, the word school means a place of leisure and conversation. This sounds like it is tapping into those roots.