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Special Focus: Bridging the Skills Gap | WISE - World Innovation Summit for Education

Special Focus: Bridging the Skills Gap | WISE - World Innovation Summit for Education | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Over and above the annual Summit, WISE is an international initiative and platform for a multitude of established and new educational actors to collaborate proactively all year round.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, February 1, 2013 8:57 AM

A MUST check!

 

Emily ivanco's comment, March 5, 2013 9:36 PM
Each school provides different education programs. This allows there to be much difference when people apply for jobs. The skills that students gain are more broad and different from other students. This depends upon what school they attended and what teachers were there.
:: The 4th Era ::
Impact of the internet age on human culture and education policy/administration
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Introducing this work

Introducing this work | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

For the purposes of this Scoop.it site, the history of human interaction with information may be divided into 4 eras. The first (spoken) era ended with the invention of writing around 3000-4000 BC. The second era ended with the invention of the printing press in 1440. The third era ended, and the fourth began, with the invention of the Internet (depending how one defines its operational beginning) somewhere between 1969 and 1982. We now exist early, but decidedly, in the fourth era.

 

All readers may not agree with this interpretation of the history of information, especially with the division and numbering of the eras. That is not the main point. Rather, it is that humankind is presently existing in an era distinctly different from the one that preceded it -- that in fact, this new era is accompanied with, and characterized by, a new - and quite different - information landscape. This new Internet information landscape will challenge, disrupt, and overpower the print-oriented one that came before it. It will not completely obliterate that which preceded it, but it will render it to a subsidiary, rather than primary, level of influence.

 

Just as the printing press altered humanity's relationship with information, thereby resulting in massive restructuring of political, religious, economic, social, educational, cultural, scientific, and other realms of life; so too will the advance of digital technology occasion analogous transformations in the corresponding universe of present and future human activity.

 

This site will concern itself primarily with how K-20 education in the US, and the people who comprise its constituencies, may be affected by this transformative movement from one era to the next. All ideas considered here appear, to me at least, to impact the learning enterprise in some way. Accordingly, this work looks at the present and the future through a lens that is predominantly, but far from entirely, a digital one. -JL

 

Opinions expressed, scooped, or copied in this Scoop.it topic are my own, or a result of my own judgment, and should in no way be understood to reflect those of my employer.

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Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:43 AM
Jim - I like your perspective. Great subject matter here!
Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:46 AM
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Azania Nduli-AmaZulu UbuntuPsychology.ORG's curator insight, July 8, 2013 6:24 PM

Beautiful!

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Fall Foliage Map 2017 & Nationwide Peak Leaf Forecast

Fall Foliage Map 2017 & Nationwide Peak Leaf Forecast | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
When will the leaves start changing? When will they peak? Our 2017 Fall Foliage Map and leaf prediction tool has the answers you are looking for.

 

via the Scout Report

 

"Smoky Mountains National Park has released this helpful, interactive map that predicts when foliage lovers can expect to see fall colors this upcoming September and October. By selecting a date, visitors can view where trees are expected to be at "peak" color across the county. Predictions are organized by week (from the week of August 13th through the week of October 29th) and expressed via a scale of seven descriptions, from "No Change" to "Past Peak." In addition to this interactive map, visitors can find a helpful scientific explanation of why leaves turn color in the autumn, and what unique chemical compounds can be found in orange, red, and yellow leaves. These explanations are designed to be accessible to learners of all ages and provide a way for caretakers and educators to engage young nature enthusiasts with the science and beauty of autumn."

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Collection of Papers on Quality in Higher Education

Collection of Papers on Quality in Higher Education | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Higher Learning Commission - Collection of Papers on Quality in Higher Education

 

"Established in 1895, the Higher Learning Commission accredits college and university institutions in nineteen states. The Commission hosts an annual conference that invites participating institutions to speak on the accreditation process, as well as best practices for institutional administration, curriculum, and pedagogy. A collection of papers is published from each annual conference - the link above takes visitors to an organized collection of papers from 2016, which can be browsed by category. Individual paper topics include: developing meaningful assessments with limited resources, using social media to engage institutional stakeholders, and developing a "graduate experience" in two-year master's programs. These papers are authored by professionals at public universities, private four-year colleges, and two-year colleges. Additionally, visitors can explore archived collections of papers dating back to 2013 in the Archives tab."

 

via The Scout Report

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, Today, 3:51 PM
It is interesting to explore what is being done by others and their research findings.
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Putting It All Together - The Aspen Institute

Putting It All Together - The Aspen Institute | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"The first case study from the Aspen Institute’s National Commission on Social, Emotional, and Academic Development (SEAD) shows how schools and educators enhance learning when they teach a curriculum that simultaneously builds students’ social, emotional, and academic understanding.

 

"Putting It All Together discusses how an integrative approach is different from developing social emotional skills through stand-alone programs, details the benefits of such an approach, acknowledges the challenges to doing this work well, and provides supports and strategies for overcoming those challenges.

"The case study vividly paints a picture of what this looks like by sharing on-the-ground examples from across the country. At Capital City Public Charter School in D.C., students learn collaboration, critical feedback, and leadership skills in its lessons across subject areas, developing key social skills that are essential for academic learning as well as for later professional life. San Francisco Unified School District’s “growth mindset” math program builds students’ confidence, persistence, and ability to take academic risks by teaching that mistakes are an essential part of learning.

"Other examples include:

-The Facing History and Ourselves curriculum engages students in examining racism, prejudice, and intolerance to try to develop a more humane and informed citizenry.
-The New Tech Network of schools uses project-based learning to make learning authentic and encourage students to collaborate.
-The Center for the Collaborative Classroom’s curriculum helps to support the academic, ethical, and social development of children."

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Feds release data on nondegree credentials, including certificates and licenses

Feds release data on nondegree credentials, including certificates and licenses | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
More than one quarter of Americans hold a non-degree credential, such as a certificate or an occupational license or certification, according to new data from the federal government. And 21 percent have a completed a work experience program such as an internship, residency or apprenticeship.
The new report from the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics is based on responses from 47,744 adults to a 2016 survey. Its goal, the department said, was to learn more about the prevalence of these credentials as well as to gauge perceptions about their value in the job market.
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A Unified Theory for Designing Just About Anything – Christina Wodtke – Medium

A Unified Theory for Designing Just About Anything – Christina Wodtke – Medium | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Using CAMP
"CAMP can be a diagnostic tool, as I had first intended. When student work is off, I can ask myself “what is broken here?” Incomplete understanding of context? Wrong context? Lack of architecture? Inharmonious mechanics? Not enough testing to

assure the Poetics meet the intent?


"But more and more I find myself turning to CAMP as I make my own work. I use CAMP when I design a class."

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

A wonderful article on one educator/designer's search/journey for a way to approach design. Along the way, author Wodtke shares many links of value. Her unified theory, CAMP, appears to offers great promise for educators.

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Opinion | The Suburb of the Future, Almost Here :: NY Times

Opinion | The Suburb of the Future, Almost Here :: NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"...millennial suburbanites want a new kind of landscape. They want breathing room but disdain the energy wastefulness, visual monotony and social conformity of postwar manufactured neighborhoods. If new suburbs can hit the sweet spot that accommodates the priorities of that generation, millennial habitats will redefine everyday life for all suburbanites, which is 70 percent of Americans.

How can technology, revolutionary design and planning transform suburban living?

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Developing a critical mind against fake news

Developing a critical mind against fake news | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
"Having moved from light surfing, babbling and chatting to data mining for the purpose of manipulation and destabilization, the digital transformation of the media landscape underscores the growing importance of media and information literacy. This form of education must rethink the media and the political and ethical foundations that legitimize it."

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, September 17, 12:36 AM

Thanks to Jim Lerman.

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What Trump's Decision to Withdraw From the Climate Accord Means for Teachers

What Trump's Decision to Withdraw From the Climate Accord Means for Teachers | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Teachers are grappling with how to present the recent overhaul in the federal government's stance on environmental issues.

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Creating a Culture of Innovation

Creating a Culture of Innovation | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"The beginning of the school year is a great opportunity to proactively shape the culture of your school, and a culture of innovation can amplify the impact of technology. Take advantage of this time to nurture an environment where teachers are encouraged to take risks and try new things in order to better serve students. Use this guide to access guiding principles and actionable tips for creating a culture of innovation among teachers and staff."

 

via Google for Education Newsletter

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How U.S. News college rankings promote economic inequality on campus

How U.S. News college rankings promote economic inequality on campus | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"America’s universities are getting two report cards this year. The first, from the Equality of Opportunity Project, brought the shocking revelation that many top universities, including Princeton and Yale, admit more students from the top 1 percent of earners than the bottom 60 percent combined. The second, from U.S. News and World Report, is due on Tuesday — with Princeton and Yale among the contenders for the top spot in the annual rankings.

"The two are related: A POLITICO review shows that the criteria used in the U.S. News rankings — a measure so closely followed in the academic world that some colleges have built them into strategic plans — create incentives for schools to favor wealthier students over less wealthy applicants.

"Those criteria often serve as unofficial guidelines for some colleges’ admission decisions and financial priorities, with a deeply ingrained assumption that the more a school spends — and the more elite its student body — the higher it climbs in the rankings. And that reinforces what many see as a dire situation in American higher education.

“We are creating a permanent underclass in America based on education — something we’ve never had before,” said Brit Kirwan, former chancellor of the University of Maryland system."

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To Fall in Love With Anyone, Do This (Updated With Podcast)

To Fall in Love With Anyone, Do This (Updated With Podcast) | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"In Mandy Len Catron’s Modern Love essay, “To Fall in Love With Anyone, Do This,” she refers to a study by the psychologist Arthur Aron(and others) that explores whether intimacy between two strangers can be accelerated by having them ask each other a specific series of personal questions. The 36 questions in the study are broken up into three sets, with each set intended to be more probing than the previous one.

 

"The idea is that mutual vulnerability fosters closeness. To quote the study’s authors, “One key pattern associated with the development of a close relationship among peers is sustained, escalating, reciprocal, personal self-disclosure.” Allowing oneself to be vulnerable with another person can be exceedingly difficult, so this exercise forces the issue.

 

"The final task Ms. Catron and her friend try — staring into each other’s eyes for four minutes — is less well documented, with the suggested duration ranging from two minutes to four. But Ms. Catron was unequivocal in her recommendation. “Two minutes is just enough to be terrified,” she told me. “Four really goes somewhere.”

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Harvard's incoming freshman class is one-third legacy—here's why that's a problem :: CNBC

Harvard's incoming freshman class is one-third legacy—here's why that's a problem :: CNBC | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Top schools now have record low admission rates, but only some students have to worry about what that means for their chances. Legacy admissions, at elite institutions especially, put a select few at a distinct advantage.

"Harvard's incoming class of 2021 is made up of over 29 percent legacy students, reports The Harvard Crimson. Last year's applicants who had Harvard in their blood were three times more likely to get into the school than those without.

"The case is the same at Stanford. In fact, across the top 30 schools in the U.S., one review from 2011 discussed in the Washington Post found that children of alumni "had a 45 percent greater chance of admission" than other applicants."

 

"Legacy students tend to be wealthy and white, students who, as a group, are already disproportionately represented at college. The New York Times found that, at five Ivy League schools, Dartmouth, Princeton, Yale, Penn and Brown, as well as 33 other colleges, there are more students from families in the top one percent than from the entire bottom 60 percent."

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The Education Department Will Allow Two Large For-Profit Colleges To Become Nonprofits

The Education Department Will Allow Two Large For-Profit Colleges To Become Nonprofits | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
The Education Department has offered its stamp of approval for the controversial sale of two massive for-profit colleges, Kaplan University and the Art Institutes, according to emails obtained by BuzzFeed News — allowing both schools to convert to nonprofit colleges. Kaplan, which was purchased by Purdue University, will become a public college.

The two high-profile conversions have been closely watched by the for-profit education industry, which sees them as a bellwether for future attempts to convert to nonprofits. More and more for-profit colleges have been eyeing conversions as the industry continues to struggle to enroll students.

But there were questions about whether conversions would be allowed by federal overseers. The Obama administration had begun to block such deals over concerns that schools would not actually operate as nonprofits, independent from the for-profit entities that once owned them. There were also worries in and out of the administration that nonprofit conversions were being used to evade regulations.
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Midwives Chronicle: The Heritage Blog of the Royal College of Midwives

Midwives Chronicle: The Heritage Blog of the Royal College of Midwives | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Midwifery history from the Royal College of Midwives [UK]. [Above image from 1601]

 

"The UK's Royal College of Midwives (RCM) dates back to 1881, and continues to work "to enhance the confidence, professional practice and influence of midwives for the benefit of child-bearing women and their families, nationally and internationally." The RCM also authors the Midwives Chronicle and Nursing Notes, a blog dedicated to the history of midwifery, featuring archival items from its extensive library. Several recent posts allows visitors to read select interviews from the the Midwife's Tale Oral History project, which centered on stories of midwives and women who gave birth during the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s. These interviews provide insight into an evolving profession and address a range of issues, including relationships between midwives and doctors, the experience of giving birth as a trained midwife, and postpartum depression. (Interested visitors can check out the full transcripts of all of these interviews via a link included in these posts). Another recent post allows visitors to read the very first issue of Nursing Notes: A Practical Journal, published in 1888."

 

via The Scout Report

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Teaching & Assessing Soft Skills via Catlin Tucker

Teaching & Assessing Soft Skills via Catlin Tucker | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
The career landscape is changing dramatically. The Bureau of Labor Statistics states that the average worker currently holds ten different jobs before the age of forty. This requires a high degree of flexibility and adaptability. Students who leave high school

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Supporting Students' Social, Emotional, and Academic Development: The Evidence Base for How We Learn

"Major domains of human development—social, emotional, cognitive, linguistic, academic—are deeply intertwined in the brain and in behavior, and all are central to learning.

 

"These skills can be grouped into three interconnected domains: (1) cognitive skills including executive functions such as working memory, attention control and flexibility, inhibition, and planning, as well as beliefs and attitudes that guide one’s sense of self and approaches to learning and growth; (2) emotional competencies that enable one to cope with frustration, recognize and manage emotions, and understand others’ emotions and perspectives; and (3) social and interpersonal skills that enable one to read social cues, navigate social situations, resolve interpersonal conflicts, cooperate with others and work effectively in a team, and demonstrate compassion and empathy toward others.

 

"Drawing on evidence from a range of disciplines and perspectives, it is clear that social and emotional skills and competencies develop in a complex system of contexts, interactions, and relationships.iv Therefore, it is important for organizations to take a systems approach to promoting development in these areas— addressing adult skills and beliefs; organizational culture, climate, and norms; and routines and structures that guide basic interactions and instruction. As described in greater detail below, such approaches are most effective when designed to match the needs and contexts of specific organizations and communities."

 

 

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The Art of the OKR

The Art of the OKR | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

The OKR approach to setting goals has been used at Google, Linkedin, Zynga, General Assembly and beyond and is spreading like wildfire across successful Silicon Valley companies.  The companies have adopted the approach are growing like weeds. OKRs provide focus, united the teams behind a single strategy, and makes all goals into stretch goals.  If  want to get your entire company to execute like the hounds of hell are behind them and the gates of Valhalla are open before them, try the OKR approach out.

"OKR stands for Objectives and Key Results. The form of the OKR has been more or less standardized. The Objective is qualitative, and the KR’s (most often three) are quantitative. They are used to focus a group or individual around a bold goal. The objective sets a goal for a set period of time, usually a quarter. The key results tell you if the objective has been met by the end of the time.

"Before you set OKRs, it is critical your company have a mission. Without a sense of purpose AND a scope to accomplish it, anything you do is equally ok.  I’ve written a bit on this in the North Star post."

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Copyright Lessons for Students and Teachers :: Richard Byrne

Copyright Lessons for Students and Teachers :: Richard Byrne | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Taking the Mystery Out of Copyright is a resource for kids produced by the Library of Congress. Taking the Mystery Out of Copyright is intended to help elementary school students understand the purposes and functions of copyright. There are four sections to Taking the Mystery Out of Copyright. The first section, Copyright Exposed, features a short cartoon that explains how copyright protects artists. Files on Record, the second section, chronicles important historical developments in copyright law. The third section, Reading the Fine Print, answers common questions and addresses common myths about copyright laws. The last section, Steps to Copyright, instructs students on registering their own works for copyright protection.
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Let’s Tax the Collection and Storage of Personal Information

Let’s Tax the Collection and Storage of Personal Information | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Now I’m not a tax genius. But I know that if I did consulting work for you and you paid me with a car, that car is income. It’s taxable. It’s also potentially taxable as property. If at the end of the year I have a bunch of cars sitting around from clients, that’s profit. The IRS doesn’t say, well these are cars, they are not payment. So why when I give Google my personal data in exchange for services is that not income?

So tax it. And because it has worse effects on society than holding on to money, tax it at a higher rate, and in more ways.

Taxing personal data collected from individuals would force companies to make decisions about what data to collect and keep with the externalities priced in. We could imagine pricing data on individuals at about $10/MB, and taxing it yearly at 10%. To remind you: a megabyte is quite a lot of data. The entire text of Shakespeare’s Hamlet is less than a fifth of a megabyte. If Google and Equifax won’t pay $1 a year to hold a megabyte on you, then clearly the social risks of holding that data outweigh the benefits. No one doubts that holding a megabyte of data on someone confers more more social risk than a dollar a year. If that data is not worth that to them, they should let it go.
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3 modern Instructional Designer Skills for creating a cohesive learning experience

3 modern Instructional Designer Skills for creating a cohesive learning experience | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Instructional Designers are trained in the latest cutting edge technologies and are adept at using creative techniques to build custom training solutions. They are known for their passion for learning, along with their writing, researching, and communication skills. They must also be effective project managers and flexible problem solvers. These Instructional Designer skills are necessary but will be insufficient unless they are applied with a “learner first” philosophy, which places the needs of the learner ahead of the presentation of the content in the eLearning course. Here are 3 modern Instructional Designer skills the experts use to focus on the needs of their learner:

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My Personal Experience with the Equifax Debacle 

My Personal Experience with the Equifax Debacle  | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Probably like many of you, my family and I have been freaked out by the Equifax hack and have worked really hard to find out how to protect ourselves, and then do it.

 

The consensus view on basic protection is to:

 

1. Contact all 3 credit services and place a "Credit Freeze" on your account with them. Experian say, "a credit freeze makes it more difficult for an identity thief to open accounts in your name and also prevents new lenders from accessing your information unless you lift it."  The credit freeze remains in place until you notify them to "thaw" (or remove) it.

 

TransUnion calls the "Credit Freeze" a "Security Freeze." Both Experian and Equifax call it a "Credit Freeze."

 

You have to contact each service individually. This freeze is free (as of 9/15/17)

 

2. Contact 1 of the credit services and file a "Fraud Alert." There are 3 types of Fraud Alerts, but the simplest to get is a Temporary Alert that lasts for 90 days. These alerts are renewable after the first 90 days. With such a Temporary Fraud Alert, the credit service (and/or creditor) has to contact you for permission before they can access your credit information.

 

You only have to notify 1 of the 3 credit services for this; the one you contact is required by law to notify the other 2. This service is free (as of 9/15/17).

 

There are other things you can do to protect yourself. For example, each of the 3 credit services offers Identity Theft Protection, for a price. There are also other companies that do this. The most well known of these is probably LifeLock. All these services can be helpful, but they are expensive. Each member of your family over 18 is charged individually for this service. At anywhere from $15-$30 per month per person, or more, this mounts up fast. Whether you decide to do this is up to you.

 

AAA also has a form of Identity Theft Protection built into membership at no extra cost.

 

SOME TIPS

 

1. The 3 credit services are Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion. You may contact them by phone, internet, mail, or fax (not all of them may accept faxes all the time).

 

Based on my experience over this past week, phone is by all means the easiest, fastest, and least expensive way to communicate with the 3 credit services. I was able to take care of all my business using my phone's touch keys -- did not have to talk to a human being at all! Each transaction only took a few minutes.

 

I found trying to do it online impossible. The lines are overloaded and the systems break down. I must have entered my information 50 times, to no avail. As time goes by, this will probably get easier as demand decreases, but right now, it's terrible. I actually spent several hours trying to get through this way.

 

Doing it by mail or fax requires you to supply more information than by phone and also copies of certain documents. This seems crazy to do unless there's a specific reason.

 

2. The credit services have a zillion phone numbers; which one should I call? Today, I received a mass email from one of my U.S. Senators which had the right numbers to use. Each one worked like a charm. These are the numbers that worked for me:

 

Equifax          800-685-1111

Experian        888-397-3742

TransUnion   800-680-7289

 

3. Even with taking all these steps, the "experts" say there is no way to be fully, 100% protected. That's really great. My wife heard on the news today that, 2 months ago, Equifax was considering a software defense package that was designed to head off this kind of first-world catastrophe. They declined to acquire it. :-(  I wonder how much CEO Smith's bonus will be this Xmas?

 

On the other hand, what about our sisters and brothers in Texas and Florida?

 

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Pillars of Academia: The colleges that produce the most altruistic students, by state - Pillrs

Pillars of Academia: The colleges that produce the most altruistic students, by state - Pillrs | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Which national universities in the US produce the most altruistic students for their state? And how do they measure up against each other?

 

Based on data from The Washington Monthly. -JL

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, September 15, 12:01 PM
Intriguing to see comparisons of top universities per state that produce the most altruistic students.
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LinkedIn's 2017 State of Salary Report (U.S.)

LinkedIn's 2017 State of Salary Report (U.S.) | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
The job market in the United States is tightening, and that’s a good thing for professionals. The unemployment rate is the lowest it's been since 2001, and the percentage of prime working age adults who are employed is the highest it’s been since 2008.

 

"While the steady improvement of the job market over the past year hasn’t been the same across all industries and job functions, things have gotten better for workers across skill levels, industries and regions. What does this mean for you? Bargaining power for many workers, like you, is increasing and opens the door to raises, and greater economic opportunity

 

"Salary is a key factor in most career decisions. When deciding where to work, where to live, or what to study, pay is often top of mind. The problem is, you don’t always have the compensation data you need to make the best decisions. You decide between paths without knowing the payoffs.

 

"To give you more visibility into your next career move, we examined data from more than two million LinkedIn members. We looked at how salaries vary by job title, education level and field of study, location, company size, and industry."

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Iceland knows how to stop teen substance abuse but the rest of the world isn’t listening

Iceland knows how to stop teen substance abuse but the rest of the world isn’t listening | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

":In 1992, 14-, 15- and 16-year-olds in every school in Iceland filled in a questionnaire with these kinds of questions. This process was then repeated in 1995 and 1997.

 

The results of these surveys were alarming. Nationally, almost 25 per cent were smoking every day, over 40 per cent had got drunk in the past month. But when the team drilled right down into the data, they could identify precisely which schools had the worst problems – and which had the least. Their analysis revealed clear differences between the lives of kids who took up drinking, smoking and other drugs, and those who didn’t. A few factors emerged as strongly protective: participation in organised activities – especially sport – three or four times a week, total time spent with parents during the week, feeling cared about at school, and not being outdoors in the late evenings."

 

"Today, Iceland tops the European table for the cleanest-living teens. The percentage of 15- and 16-year-olds who had been drunk in the previous month plummeted from 42 per cent in 1998 to 5 per cent in 2016. The percentage who have ever used cannabis is down from 17 per cent to 7 per cent. Those smoking cigarettes every day fell from 23 per cent to just 3 per cent.

The way the country has achieved this turnaround has been both radical and evidence-based, but it has relied a lot on what might be termed enforced common sense. “This is the most remarkably intense and profound study of stress in the lives of teenagers that I have ever seen,” says Milkman. “I’m just so impressed by how well it is working.”

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

This article is wonderful and, to me, very important because it confirms my beliefs (and I imagine those many others) about what works in helping teens avoid negative life choices and embracing life affirming ones. Well worth reading.

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10 Roles of Effective Project-Based Learning Leadership

10 Roles of Effective Project-Based Learning Leadership | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"We live in a project-based world. Consider these examples of leaders in business and education that organize their work into projects:

-A senior project manager leads an engineering team to design a new airfoil for an airplane, managing a large staff based in multiple countries to coordinate design, creation and go to market strategy.
-A marketing manager leads a large team to design campaigns to promote new virtual reality apps and games (that goes viral).
-A high school principal leads a working group of committed teachers and community-based partners to redesign the school’s credit-based transcript to become a competency-based transcript.

 

In the new publication, Leadership for Learning: What is Leadership’s Role in Supporting Students?, the authors write that “leadership is the art of enabling a learning community to move from current to future state by continuously and dramatically improving its capacity to enable better outcomes for all students through influence on the organization itself, its stakeholders and the systems within which it operates.”

Leaders need to manage and lead a myriad of different projects and people. In our Project-Based World campaign, we are asking: What skills, dispositions and mindsets do leaders need to be effective leaders in a project-based world?

We believe leaders should experience the same types of learning experiences they wish to create for teachers and students."

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