:: The 4th Era ::
86.0K views | +1 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Eclectic Technology
onto :: The 4th Era ::
Scoop.it!

Empathy In Creativity and Design Thinking

Empathy In Creativity and Design Thinking | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

RSA Animate recently released a video called 'The Power of Outrospection'. The video intrigued me and this post has helped me pull together some of my thoughts about the links between empathy and creativity.
The post explores empathy in a variety of fields, including design, human services, and the creative fields, and the video is also embedded in the post. Take the opportunity to read the post, watch the video, and ponder how empathy allows us to be creative as we look for new solutions for whatever issues we face.


Via Beth Dichter
more...
creativity@NIS's curator insight, September 2, 2014 3:59 AM

Sam: Looks good. Commenting doesn't send a box to the top of the screen.

David Collins's curator insight, October 29, 2014 1:33 AM

More food for thought . . .

:: The 4th Era ::
Exploration of the new era in human history marked by invention of the Internet
Curated by Jim Lerman
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Introducing this work

Introducing this work | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

For the purposes of this Scoop.it site, the history of human interaction with information may be divided into 4 eras. The first (spoken) era ended with the invention of writing around 3000-4000 BC. The second era ended with the invention of the printing press in 1440. The third era ended, and the fourth began, with the invention of the Internet (depending how one defines its operational beginning) somewhere between 1969 and 1982. We now exist early, but decidedly, in the fourth era.

 

All readers may not agree with this interpretation of the history of information, especially with the division and numbering of the eras. That is not the main point. Rather, it is that humankind is presently existing in an era distinctly different from the one that preceded it -- that in fact, this new era is accompanied with, and characterized by, a new - and quite different - information landscape. This new Internet information landscape will challenge, disrupt, and overpower the print-oriented one that came before it. It will not completely obliterate that which preceded it, but it will render it to a subsidiary, rather than primary, level of influence.

 

Just as the printing press altered humanity's relationship with information, thereby resulting in massive restructuring of political, religious, economic, social, educational, cultural, scientific, and other realms of life; so too will the advance of digital technology occasion analogous transformations in the corresponding universe of present and future human activity.

 

This site will concern itself primarily with how K-20 education in the US, and the people who comprise its constituencies, may be affected by this transformative movement from one era to the next. All ideas considered here appear, to me at least, to impact the learning enterprise in some way. Accordingly, this work looks at the present and the future through a lens that is predominantly, but far from entirely, a digital one. -JL

 

Opinions expressed, scooped, or copied in this Scoop.it topic are my own, or a result of my own judgment, and should in no way be understood to reflect those of my employer.

more...
Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:43 AM
Jim - I like your perspective. Great subject matter here!
Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:46 AM
Shared via LinkedIn!
Azania Nduli-AmaZulu UbuntuPsychology.ORG's curator insight, July 8, 2013 6:24 PM

Beautiful!

Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Bill Gates: the Robot Taking Your Job Should Pay Taxes

Bill Gates: the Robot Taking Your Job Should Pay Taxes | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
The prospect of automation taking away human jobs is both alarming and an opportunity to reorient our civilization to new objectives. The worrying part is that a sizable number of jobs, both blue and white collar, might be gone soon - a number that some estimates put as high as 47% during the next 25 years.

How will we adjust to this transformation? How will the people without jobs survive? Some ideas, floated by people like Elon Musk, see the necessity of instituting a universal basic income. Another approach was just proposed by Bill Gates, one of the original tech superstars and prognosticators, who also happens to be the world’s richest man. In an interview with Quartz, Bill Gates explained his view that as robots will be taking human jobs, a “robot tax” will be necessary on the companies that employ them. 

Gates sees this as a positive development, because the tax would fund jobs that do not receive enough focus and talent currently, including elderly care and working with kids. These types of jobs that require empathy are better left to the humans. The government would run such programs. Gates thinks business cannot be left to manage this because growing “inequity” due to automation can only be addressed via the government.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Beyond ‘Hidden Figures’: Nurturing New Black and Latino Math Whizzes

Beyond ‘Hidden Figures’: Nurturing New Black and Latino Math Whizzes | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
The extreme racial homogeneity in the rarefied realm of young math wizards has drawn little attention in a nation where racial equality in the basic institutions of civic life — schools, housing, health care, policing — remains elusive. But it has become an increasing source of consternation for some mathematicians, educators and business leaders, who see it directly linked to the striking underrepresentation of blacks and Latinos in high-paying, high-status jobs in finance, science and technology. As those occupations increasingly propel our society, they fear that enrichment programs for mathematically gifted children, while rooted in meritocratic ideals, have become a particularly potent means of reinforcing privilege.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Modern Educational Technology and eLearning
Scoop.it!

Schools in Finland will no longer teach 'subjects' | EDUcation CHANGE | Teaching by Topic

Schools in Finland will no longer teach 'subjects' | EDUcation CHANGE | Teaching by Topic | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

For years, Finland has been the by-word for a successful education system, perched at the top of international league tables for literacy and numeracy.

.

Pasi Silander, the city’s development manager, explained: “What we need now is a different kind of education to prepare people for working life.

.

“Young people use quite advanced computers. In the past the banks had lots of  bank clerks totting up figures but now that has totally changed.

.

“We therefore have to make the changes in education that are necessary for industry and modern society.”

.

Subject-specific lessons – an hour of history in the morning, an hour of geography in the afternoon – are already being phased out for 16-year-olds in the city’s upper schools. They are being replaced by what the Finns call “phenomenon” teaching – or teaching by topic. For instance, a teenager studying a vocational course might take “cafeteria services” lessons, which would include elements of maths, languages (to help serve foreign customers), writing skills and communication skills.

.

More academic pupils would be taught cross-subject topics such as the European Union - which would merge elements of economics, history (of the countries involved), languages and geography.

.


Via Gust MEES, John Rudkin, Shaona Williams
more...
jmoreillon's curator insight, March 27, 2015 9:42 AM

This is what school librarians have been doing forever!

María Florencia Perrone's curator insight, April 8, 2015 4:00 PM

The world around us is not labelled or divided in categories, then why is academic content? Can we not relate topics and elaborate meaning on the basis of relationships and intertwined data? 

Helen Teague's curator insight, April 13, 2015 9:11 PM

I wonder if this would work in the U.S.? Also, in Finland, students do not take standardized tests until the end of high school (Zhao, 2012, p. 111), so thankfully, perhaps the drill and kill process is diminished.


*Zhao, Y. (2012). World Class Learners. 

Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Digital Culture
Scoop.it!

Swarm AI correctly predicted the outcome of Super Bowl LI, right down to the final score

Swarm AI correctly predicted the outcome of Super Bowl LI, right down to the final score | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Artificial intelligence software accurately predicted the outcome of the Super Bowl right down to the 34-28 score.

Via nukem777
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Digital Culture
Scoop.it!

Microsoft’s president wants an international treaty to protect civilians from cyberwar

Microsoft’s president wants an international treaty to protect civilians from cyberwar | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Microsoft calls for an international treaty to prevent companies and citizens from getting tangled up in nation-state cyberattacks.

Via nukem777
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Comparing Paper-Pencil and Computer Test Scores: 7 Key Research Studies

Comparing Paper-Pencil and Computer Test Scores: 7 Key Research Studies | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
News that millions of students who took the PARCC exams on computers tended to score worse than those who took the tests on paper raises an important question:

Do the computer-based exams that are increasingly prevalent in K-12 measure the same things as more traditional paper-based tests?

Read Education Week's coverage: PARCC Scores Lower for Students Who Took Exams on Computer

Broadly speaking, it's a dilemma that researchers and psychometricians have been wrestling with for at least the past 20 years, said Derek Briggs, a professor of research and evaluation methodology at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

"But it's really hit within the last two years, with Smarter Balanced and PARCC and even states that are going online with their own versions [of those exams]," said Briggs, who serves on the technical advisory committees for both the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers and the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium, both of which created exams aligned with the new Common Core State Standards that were administered over multiple states during the 2014-15 school year.

On one hand, Briggs noted, computer- and paper-based versions of an exam shouldn't necessarily be expected to measure the same things, or have comparable results. Part of the motivation for pouring hundreds of millions of federal dollars into the new consortia exams, after all, was to use technology to create better tests that elicit more evidence of students' critical thinking skills, ability to model and solve problems, and so forth.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Under New Leadership, FCC Quashes Report on E-rate Program's Success

Under New Leadership, FCC Quashes Report on E-rate Program's Success | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
The Federal Communications Commission on Friday rescinded its own report documenting the success of the E-rate program, a multi-billion dollar FCC-led initiative that has helped tens of thousands of schools and libraries obtain high-speed internet access.

The report will have "no legal or other effect or meaning going forward," according to the commission's order.

The move prompted sharp criticism from education and open-government groups—and a warning from Florida Sen. Bill Nelson.

"While new FCC leadership may have new policy directions, the public record should not be permanently altered," the American Library Association said in a statement.

"We urge the reversal of the retraction decisions and an agreement that the FCC will not order the removal of any other documents from the public record."

The report was released on January 18, just two days before former FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler, a Democrat who oversaw major changes to the E-rate program during his tenure, stepped down. 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

First They Got Sick, Then They Moved Into a Virtual Utopia

First They Got Sick, Then They Moved Into a Virtual Utopia | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Today, Second Life is mostly forgotten by the broader public. An estimated 800,000 users are active on a monthly basis, according to Second Life parent company Linden Lab. That’s tiny compared to the 1.86 billion users who are active on Facebook each month.

 

"Yet some communities have quietly continued to thrive in the virtual world. One of these is the disability community, a sundry group whose members include people who are blind or deaf, people with emotional handicaps such as autism and PTSD, and people with conditions that limit their mobility, such as Parkinson’s, cerebral palsy, and multiple sclerosis. There are no official tallies of their numbers, but Wagner James Au, who has written extensively about Second Life, estimates they may account for roughly 20 percent of users. Some active members estimate the number higher — at as much as 50 percent.

 

"Unlike traditional gaming, Second Life is governed by few rules. Residents can customize their avatars in an infinite number of ways. They can fly and teleport as easily as they can walk, run, and jump. They can build bespoke homes and islands almost from scratch, and buy and sell wares in virtual stores — from biker gear to bird song to the ability to swim like a mermaid. They can marry a Second Life lover, take a rocket to the moon, or simply tuck themselves into bed at night.

 

"For many disabled residents, who may spend 12 hours a day or more in Second Life, the most important moments and relationships of their lives happen inside the virtual world. For them, the fevered fantasies of a decade ago have become reality: Second Life is where they live."

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

A wonderfully inspiring article. I am so glad to have read it. I'm betting you will probably enjoy it too.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Into the Driver's Seat
Scoop.it!

NMC Horizon Report: 2017 Higher Education Edition | #ModernEDU 

Download the NMC Horizon Report: 2017 Higher Education Edition at http://go.nmc.org/2017-he. The New Media Consortium (NMC) and EDUCAUSE Learning Initiativ

 


Via Gust MEES, Jim Lerman
more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, February 15, 9:01 AM

Download the NMC Horizon Report: 2017 Higher Education Edition at http://go.nmc.org/2017-he. The New Media Consortium (NMC) and EDUCAUSE Learning Initiativ.

 

MartinVermaak's comment, February 15, 10:26 AM
http://www.apsense.com/article/how-to-solve-hp-scanner-common-issues.html
Oskar Almazan's curator insight, February 17, 12:35 AM
10 highlights capture the big picture themes of educational change that underpin the 18 topics:

1 Advancing progressive learning approaches requires cultural transformation.
2 Real-world skills are needed to bolster employability and workplace development.
3 Collaboration is key for scaling effective solutions.
4 Despite the proliferation of technology and online learning materials, access is still unequal.
5 Processes for assessing nuanced skills at a personal level are needed
6 Fluency in the digital realm is more than just understanding how to use technology.
7 Online, mobile, and blended learning are foregone conclusions. 
8 Learning ecosystems must be agile enough to support the practices of the future.
9 Higher education is an incubator for developing more intuitive computers.
10 Lifelong learning is the lifeblood of higher education
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Privacy is Power – Standard Journal

Privacy is Power – Standard Journal | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
As humans in this century, some of the most important byproducts of our existence is the information produced and stored in our emails, notes, and messages. And make no mistake about it: this information belongs to you, and to no one else. You can join the fight for a balanced control of power by using and supporting applications that strive for privacy first and foremost.

 

8 apps for everyday use that put privacy first. -JL

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

What Is A Brochure???? - Teacher Tech ::  Alice Keeler

What Is A Brochure???? - Teacher Tech ::  Alice Keeler | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

The Real World

I often hear the justification of preparing students for the real world as a rationale for doing something. There is a lot of picking and choosing going on as to what real world skills we are going to expose students to. Sitting in a chair all day doing paperwork is not really preparing students for the future. Helping students to be creative critical thinkers does. In the real world, collaboration and the ability to get along with a team is a highly valued skill, so why so many individual assignments? Following directions does not create leaders, freelancers or entrepreneurs but we need our students to be ready for those things. In the future jobs that follow directions are replaced by robots. RIGHT NOW if you call for an uber in some cities a self-driving car will come pick you up. Instead of an explicit list of directions, consider an open-ended challenge.

Digital Literacy

It is not a matter of preference, students MUST be digitally literate. It is absolutely every single one of our jobs to help prepare students for living in a world that interacts digitally. Does this mean every assignment should be digital, absolutely not. Use Glitter. However, with each lesson plan should we not be considering how we are increasing digital literacy? We may decide this lesson/activity is not enhanced by tech, but many can be! How many people do you know use a FitBit to enhance their physical activity?


Choose Modern Skills

Uh huh, maybe on some alternate planet one day one of the students in my class might find a need for making a brochure. We can always find a justification for why “cursive” is still relevant (it’s not). Sure there are some instances where that skill could maybe possibly be used some day.. because just in case there is a nuclear explosion and my calculator can not graph a parabola for me I better know how to do it by hand.

If you’re going to spend time having kids do a skill, do one that will be useful 20 years from now, not 20 years ago.

In the real world, students need to know how to analyze data not make brochures.

GET REAL!
The activities I did when I was a student are for the most part OUTDATED! That world does not exist anymore. I used to have an encyclopedia at my house, that I never used. However, daily I use Google to look stuff up. Looking stuff up is part of the modern culture. Expect kids CAN and SHOULD find information without you telling it to them. Design for it. Teach them how to do advanced search. We can not just loose kids on the Internet. Do not assume they know how to find, skim, filter and analyze information. It is important we help students learn this.

Collaborative Spreadsheet of Ideas

So if a brochure is outdated, what should we do instead? 


alicekeeler.com/upgradebrochure

 

Jim Lerman's insight:  Keeler is on a real tear these days; another outstanding post -- as told only by someone who is really doing the work and willingly trying to help lead her peers.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

chaos & cooperation :: Harold Jarche

chaos & cooperation :: Harold Jarche | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Every fortnight I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds. I am finishing three weeks in Europe so many of these posts reflect the interactions I had in Copenhagen, London, and Antwerp.

@umairh: “Fascism counts on you. Not on your support. But on your denial.”

@meacoopa: “every liberal democracy realizes early on there are some positions which must prima facie be aggressively excluded from public discourse … Fascism wriggles into democracies by insisting on the right to be heard, achieves critical mass, then dissolves the organs that installed it.”

@dabeard: “No science, no evidence, no truth, no democracy”

@SwiftonSecurity: “Trust me – modern information systems are a panopticon you are not qualified to defeat alone. Journalists are a very valuable resource here.”

@yonatanzunger: “Something you can do: Write down what happens in the news every day. Keeping a notebook helps remember, see trends, avoid gaslighting.”

Seth Godin: “Blogging is free. What matters is the meta-cognition of thinking about what you’re going to say…” via @dorait

The Internet of Cities, via @HelenBevan [I had the pleasure of meeting Helen for the first time this week]

“Most national governments now face an existential battle on two fronts: protecting themselves from their own disgruntled populations, and defending against foreign governments vying for power in the next wave of global dominance. It’s as though we’re in one big Mexican standoff between every country and religion and tribe in the world, all pointing guns at each other while we wait for the next big shoe to drop. That’s how Russia, though economically beleaguered and globally isolated, has found itself so powerful suddenly — it’s a good time to be a chaos agent.“
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Into the Driver's Seat
Scoop.it!

Find Tools to Expand Learning Time | ExpandED Schools

Find Tools to Expand Learning Time | ExpandED Schools | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Expanding Learning Time Tools and Reports

"This library contains the latest policy and research reports on expanding learning time, building out-of-school time systems and improving student outcomes, as well as tools for schools and community organizations that are expanding learning time, opportunities and support for students. In this library you will find resources such as research studies, fact sheets and evaluation reports, as well as sample school schedules, curriculum resources and evaluation tools."

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

Great collection of reports and curriculum materials dealing with out-of-school-time learning and programs that support it.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Americans and Cybersecurity

Americans and Cybersecurity | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

via The Scout Report

 

"How concerned is the average American about a cyberattack? How many Americans have personally experienced breaches of cybersecurity? Do Americans trust the federal government to protect them from cyberattacks? Do they trust social network sites, such as Facebook and Twitter, to protect their cybersecurity? In January 2017, the Pew Research Center released a 43-page report investigating American perspectives on issues of cybersecurity. This particular study is part of a multi-part series by Pew examining American attitudes towards online privacy and safety. Based on a survey of 1,040 adults in the United States, this report reveals that almost half of all Americans (49%) "feel that their personal information is less secure that it was five years ago." The survey also investigated the steps that Americans take to protect their personal data from cyberattacks. Interested readers may download the complete report (available in PDF format) from this website."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

College Costs Too Much? N.Y.U. Paves Way to Graduate Faster

College Costs Too Much? N.Y.U. Paves Way to Graduate Faster | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Students at New York University, where a year of undergraduate education can run to about $66,000 in room, board, tuition and fees, often complain about the cost of four years at the school in Greenwich Village.

Now, N.Y.U. has a suggestion for them: Finish faster.

On Friday, the university announced a series of measures that make it easier to graduate in under four years, part of an initiative aimed at diminishing the university’s enormous affordability problem.

In some ways, the school is just catching up with its students. Ellen Schall, a senior presidential fellow and the head of the university’s affordability steering committee, which is tackling college cost on a number of fronts, said that about 20 percent of N.Y.U. students already graduated ahead of schedule.

“We were surprised,” Professor Schall said. “That’s part of what convinced us we needed to make this more transparent and more available to more students.”
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Into the Driver's Seat
Scoop.it!

This Joint is Jumpin': A Fats Waller Musical

This Joint is Jumpin': A Fats Waller Musical | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

PLEASE CONSIDER SUPPORTING THE INDIEGOGO CAMPAIGN FOR MY DAUGHTER'S SHOW TO OPEN IN LONDON THIS APRIL.

THANKING YOU IN ADVANCE,

JIM

 

"This Joint is Jumpin' is an exciting, new theatrical venture fusing jazz, tap, and storytelling by bringing together critically-acclaimed emerging artists to create a piece that celebrates the artistry of early jazz icon Fats Waller. Set in an immersive Harlem rent party, the piece explores the past, present, and future of jazz music & tap dance by supporting and showcasing the work of music director and band leader Michael Mwenso, tap choreographer & dancer Michela Marino Lerman, and director Patrice Miller as they work with dramaturge Jeremy M. Barker and performers Samuel Anderson (Doctor Who, Gavin and Stacey, Emmerdale), Joseph Wiggan (Shuffle Along, Cirque du Soliel), Tony Award winner Lillias White (Dreamgirls, The Life, Netflix’s The Get Down) and Harlem's The Shakes jazz band. This new work was curated to be in the inaugural season of Andrew Lloyd Webber's The Other Palace Theater in London this April."

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Digital Culture
Scoop.it!

The Rise of the Data Engineer

The Rise of the Data Engineer | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
I joined Facebook in 2011 as a business intelligence engineer. By the time I left in 2013, I was a data engineer. I wasn’t promoted or assigned to this new role. Instead, Facebook came to realize…

Via nukem777
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from KILUVU
Scoop.it!

20 Ways To Provide Effective Feedback For Learning -

20 Ways To Provide Effective Feedback For Learning - | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Feedback for learning is a matter of communication, consistency, and tone, all driven by and for assessment practice.

Via Ramiro Aduviri Velasco, Yves Carmeille "Libre passeur"
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Comparing Paper-Pencil and Computer Test Scores: 7 Key Research Studies

Comparing Paper-Pencil and Computer Test Scores: 7 Key Research Studies | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
News that millions of students who took the PARCC exams on computers tended to score worse than those who took the tests on paper raises an important question:

Do the computer-based exams that are increasingly prevalent in K-12 measure the same things as more traditional paper-based tests?

Read Education Week's coverage: PARCC Scores Lower for Students Who Took Exams on Computer

Broadly speaking, it's a dilemma that researchers and psychometricians have been wrestling with for at least the past 20 years, said Derek Briggs, a professor of research and evaluation methodology at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

"But it's really hit within the last two years, with Smarter Balanced and PARCC and even states that are going online with their own versions [of those exams]," said Briggs, who serves on the technical advisory committees for both the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers and the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium, both of which created exams aligned with the new Common Core State Standards that were administered over multiple states during the 2014-15 school year.

On one hand, Briggs noted, computer- and paper-based versions of an exam shouldn't necessarily be expected to measure the same things, or have comparable results. Part of the motivation for pouring hundreds of millions of federal dollars into the new consortia exams, after all, was to use technology to create better tests that elicit more evidence of students' critical thinking skills, ability to model and solve problems, and so forth.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

10 Things To Know about the Future of Blockchain in Education – EdTech Strategies :: Doug Levin

10 Things To Know about the Future of Blockchain in Education – EdTech Strategies :: Doug Levin | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
I recently availed myself of the chance to join and learn from many of the leading innovators and thinkers in the emerging blockchain industry at the Chamber of Digital Commerce’s DC Blockchain Summit 2016, which billed itself (accurately, I think) as “a dialogue at the intersection of industry, regulation, and innovation.” The event had a strong financial services theme, although I met audience members engaged in a wider array of fields (including healthcare and social media). Given the growing interest in the topic and recent blockchain-related announcements specific to education by organizations such as Sony, MIT Media Lab, and the Holberton School – to say nothing of the visions advanced by BadgeChain, the KnowledgeWorks Foundation, and Learning is Earning 2026  – I thought it might spur some interesting dialogue if I took the time to share my current musings on the topic. To that end (and based on my DC Blockchain Summit experience), here is my current list of the top 10 things to know about the future of blockchain in education.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Here are the average salaries of software engineers around the world in 2017

Here are the average salaries of software engineers around the world in 2017 | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
As you can see, cost of living is an important consideration. Also, you don’t need to move to San Francisco to get a good job as a software engineer (thought there are a lot of prestigious jobs there…
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Into the Driver's Seat
Scoop.it!

Call for Diversity in Ed Tech Design - DML Central

Call for Diversity in Ed Tech Design - DML Central | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Jade Davis argues for ed tech design that considers underprivileged students in public universities and community colleges.

Via Alastair Creelman, Jim Lerman
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Extreme Protest Tactics Reduce Popular Support for Social Movements by Matthew Feinberg, Robb Willer, Chloe Kovacheff :: SSRN

Extreme Protest Tactics Reduce Popular Support for Social Movements by Matthew Feinberg, Robb Willer, Chloe Kovacheff :: SSRN | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Social movements are critical agents of change that vary greatly in both tactics and popular support. Prior work shows that extreme protest tactics – actions that are highly counter-normative, disruptive, or harmful to others, including inflammatory rhetoric, blocking traffic, and damaging property – are effective for gaining publicity. However, we find across three experiments that extreme protest tactics decreased popular support for a given cause because they reduced feelings of identification with the movement. Though this effect obtained in tests of popular responses to extreme tactics used by animal rights, Black Lives Matter, and anti-Trump protests (Studies 1-3), we found that self-identified political activists were willing to use extreme tactics because they believed them to be effective for recruiting popular support (Studies 4a & 4b). The activist’s dilemma – wherein tactics that raise awareness also tend to reduce popular support – highlights a key challenge faced by social movements struggling to affect progressive change.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Teaching my Daughter to Search - Teacher Tech  ::  Alice Keeler

Teaching my Daughter to Search - Teacher Tech  ::  Alice Keeler | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Technology is only going to get better. The reality of search engines is that our students will have access to them for their entire lives and probably in their pocket. At the moment they are wondering something they will have the ability to look it up. This reality redefines what we do in the classroom.

"What students need to know how to do is to search well.

How to find information.
Critically evaluate if it is good information.
Use information from one search to initiate another search in order to refine their search.
Utilize critical thinking skills in order to arrive at the answer.
Be able to support their answers with their research"

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

Excellent post on how to get students into searching with skill. Well worth reading and trying...even if your students think they're pretty good at it. Keeler emphasizes programs published by Google and Bing.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Putin’s Real Long Game :: Molly McKew

Putin’s Real Long Game :: Molly McKew | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Trump has shown willingness to reevaluate his positions and change course — except on issues relating to Russia, and strengthening alliances with the Kremlin’s global illiberal allies. By doing so, he is making himself a footnote to Putin’s chapter of history — little more than another of Putin’s hollow men.

"Trump should understand, regardless of what the Russians did in our elections, he already won the prize. It won’t be taken away just because he admits the Russians intervened. Taking away the secrecy of Russian actions — exposing whatever it was they did, to everyone — is the only way to take away their power over the US political system and to free himself from their strings, as well. Whatever Putin’s gambit was, Trump is the one who can make sure that Putin doesn’t win.

"Trump should set the unpredictable course and become the champion against the most toxic, ambitious regime of the modern world. Rebuilding American power — based on the values of liberal democracy — is the only escape from Putin’s corrosive vision of a world at permanent war. We need a new united front. But we must be the center of it. It matters deeply that the current generation of global revolutionaries and reformers, like my Ukrainian friend, no longer see themselves as fighting for us or our ideals.

"In a strange way, Trump could be just crazy enough — enough of an outlier and a rogue — to expose what Putin’s Russia is and end the current cycle of upheaval and decline. This requires non-standard thinking and leadership — but also purpose, and commitment, and values. It requires faith — for and from the American people and American institutions. And it requires the existence of truth.

"The alternative is accepting that our history and our nation were, in fact, not the beginning of a better — greater — world, but the long anomaly in a tyrannous and dark one."

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

Quite a lengthy analysis of the US-Russion situation, published on Dec. 31, 2016. It places Trump's reaction to Putin's campaign of world-wide governmental disruption and destabilization at the epicenter of the mid-range future. In doing so, McKay sees the possibilities of Trump's own disruptive tendencies as potential assets rather than liabilities. 

 

We'll see about that; it's a risky bet in my view.

more...
No comment yet.