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Lean Production-Inside the Real War on Public Education | Jacobin

Lean Production-Inside the Real War on Public Education | Jacobin | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Will Johnson

 

"On September 10, nearly 30,000 Chicago teachers went on strike for the first time in 25 years. This was no mere breakdown in negotiations over wages or healthcare contributions. At issue, as many have noted, was the fundamental direction of public education. The Chicago teachers asserted themselves as the first institutional force to combat what’s often called the “business model” of education reform.

 

"Meanwhile, in Detroit, students and teachers returned to dramatically altered schools. Over the summer, Roy Roberts, the schools’ “emergency financial manager,” had unilaterally imposed a contract on the city’s teacher union allowing elementary school class sizes to jump from 25 to 40 students and high school classes to 61 students. These class size reforms were coupled with a ten percent pay cut for Detroit teachers.

 

"While Detroit’s example is extreme, increased workloads for decreased pay are what teachers around the country — including in Chicago— are experiencing to varying degrees as the business model of education reform gains traction with policy-makers. But stretching workers past their breaking point and increasing hours while gutting compensation is nothing new. The business model of education reform is an extension of a process called lean production that transformed the U.S. private sector in the 1980s and 90s. In education, just as in heavy manufacturing, the greatest damage done by lean production is not done at the bargaining table, but in the destruction of teachers’ working (and students’ learning) conditions."

Jim Lerman's insight:

An infrequently encountered view on the current state of affairs in schools.

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:: The 4th Era ::
Exploration of the new era in human history marked by invention of the Internet
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Introducing this work

Introducing this work | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

For the purposes of this Scoop.it site, the history of human interaction with information may be divided into 4 eras. The first (spoken) era ended with the invention of writing around 3000-4000 BC. The second era ended with the invention of the printing press in 1440. The third era ended, and the fourth began, with the invention of the Internet (depending how one defines its operational beginning) somewhere between 1969 and 1982. We now exist early, but decidedly, in the fourth era.

 

All readers may not agree with this interpretation of the history of information, especially with the division and numbering of the eras. That is not the main point. Rather, it is that humankind is presently existing in an era distinctly different from the one that preceded it -- that in fact, this new era is accompanied with, and characterized by, a new - and quite different - information landscape. This new Internet information landscape will challenge, disrupt, and overpower the print-oriented one that came before it. It will not completely obliterate that which preceded it, but it will render it to a subsidiary, rather than primary, level of influence.

 

Just as the printing press altered humanity's relationship with information, thereby resulting in massive restructuring of political, religious, economic, social, educational, cultural, scientific, and other realms of life; so too will the Internet occasion analogous transformations in the corresponding universe of present and future human activity.

 

This site will concern itself primarily with how K-20 education in the US, and the people who comprise its constituencies, may be affected by this transformative movement from one era to the next. All ideas considered here appear, to me at least, to impact the learning enterprise in some way. Accordingly, this work looks at the present and the future through a lens that is predominantly, but far from entirely, a digital one. -JL


Opinions expressed, scooped, or copied in this Scoop.it topic are my choice, and are in no way to be connected with my employer.

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Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:46 AM
Shared via LinkedIn!
Azania Nduli-AmaZulu UbuntuPsychology.ORG's curator insight, July 8, 2013 6:24 PM

Beautiful!

M. Philip Oliver's curator insight, August 29, 2014 1:09 PM

Thanks to Jim Lerman

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Comparison of Clinton's and Sanders' higher ed spending proposals ^ InsideHigherEd ^ by Michael Stratford

Comparison of Clinton's and Sanders' higher ed spending proposals ^  InsideHigherEd ^ by Michael Stratford | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
At the heart of both plans is a new federal-state matching program that would send billions of dollars to states and colleges with the goal of seeing tuition slashed or eliminated at public colleges and universities.
For all the similarities, however, there are key differences in how Clinton and Sanders are approaching college affordability and which types of students their plans would benefit.
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Harnessing the Power of the Sharing Economy ^ Ontario Chamber of Commerce

Jim Lerman's insight:

This report says it is one of the first one in the world, from a government perspective, to address the tax, insurance, and regulatory issues raised by the advent of companies such as Uber, Autoshare, and Airbnb. Surely this is the tip of the iceberg in terms of governments seeking to benefit directly from these new types of economic arrangements.

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10 Tips for Creating Accessible Online Course Content ^ 3Play Media

10 Tips for Creating Accessible Online Course Content ^ 3Play Media | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

FREE WEBINAR, THURS. OCT. 8, 2 PM EASTERN


"With recent lawsuits in higher education and updates to Section 508 on the horizon, it is more important than ever that online learning content be made accessible to students with disabilities. In this webinar, Janet Sylvia, Web Accessibility Group Leader and Web Accessibility Trainer, will provide you with 10 tips for making your online course material accessible."

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Best Practices for Integrating Closed Captioning with Mediasite Lecture Capture ^ 3 PlayMedia

Best Practices for Integrating Closed Captioning with Mediasite Lecture Capture ^ 3 PlayMedia | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

FREE WEBINAR, WED. SEPT 9, AT 2 PM (EASTERN)


"With the proliferation of lecture capture and other video communications used for blended and online learning, educational institutions are facing legal, functional, and ethical pressures to provide video accessibility accommodations to their students and staff. For accessibility administrators and technology implementers this means figuring out the most streamlined and cost-effective solution for accessible video captioning.

In this session, Sam McCool, the Instructional Technology Manager at Nevada State College, will discuss NSC's campus accessibility policy and the solutions they implemented. We will provide a comprehensive view of the captioning process, including best practices for linking to Mediasite, as well as best practices and tips for implementing accessibility technologies. We will also go over federal accessibility laws that dictate closed captioning requirements in higher education. Looking at Nevada State College's workflow, we will walk through an efficient, cost-effective way to manage closed captioning at a university level.

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LRNG: “Passion Projects” Encourage Creativity, Connected Learning, and STEM Interests | Educator Innovator ^ by Madarantha Bivens

LRNG: “Passion Projects” Encourage Creativity, Connected Learning, and STEM Interests | Educator Innovator ^ by Madarantha Bivens | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Liberty Elementary, in Riverside, California, is bringing this idea inside and outside of the classroom, by building multi-themed learning stations for students to explore interests and produce “passion projects.”

Without having to leave the school campus, the LRNG Innovation Challenge grant-winning team created several student-centered, hands-on learning spaces. In a district that is working toward a personalized learning model, which emphasizes the importance of a student-centric approach over a teacher-driven one, teachers at Liberty Elementary interviewed students to identify interest areas and learning styles, ensuring that the project would keep students excited and strengthen skill sets. With full support from other instructors and school administration, a resource teacher and the team leading literacy coach, Norma Rodriguez, crafted and oversaw the project plan. As they gathered the information on student interests, Rodriguez also worked with teachers to match their personal interests and areas of expertise with the student activities.
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#HAZMATsurfing ^ Dyrland Productions

#HAZMATsurfing ^ Dyrland Productions | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Dyrland Productions announced a new photo collection, “HAZMAT Surfing,” featuring surfers, lifeguards, and beach goers wearing HAZMAT suites to protect themselves from the contaminated waters around Venice Beach, CA. Dyrland Productions partnered with the Surfrider Foundation, to raise awareness and capture the reality of where the future of ocean water quality might be headed should we continue to follow the current pollution trends. This collection brings to light a raw view of what beach life may be like 20 years from now.
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Three Ways to Help Teachers Use Research ^ Digital Promise ^ by Aubrey Francisco and Kelsey Gross

Three Ways to Help Teachers Use Research ^ Digital Promise ^ by Aubrey Francisco and Kelsey Gross | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
As we talked with educators at our Research Summit and in our League of Innovative Schools, we heard a recurring theme: teachers (and innovation) thrive in a “culture of data” where research use is encouraged, and staff are given opportunities to build their research skills. Administrators play a key role in fostering this culture throughout the district.

Based on feedback from educators, here are three ways administrators and district leaders can build a culture of research:
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Teacher Shortages Spur a Nationwide Hiring Scramble (Credentials Optional) ^ NY Times ^ Motoko Rich

Teacher Shortages Spur a Nationwide Hiring Scramble (Credentials Optional) ^ NY Times ^ Motoko Rich | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
In a stark about-face from just a few years ago, school districts have gone from handing out pink slips to scrambling to hire teachers.

Across the country, districts are struggling with shortages of teachers, particularly in math, science and special education — a result of the layoffs of the recession years combined with an improving economy in which fewer people are training to be teachers.
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Creating A Level Playing Field ^ Bill Boyd - The Literacy Advisor

Creating A Level Playing Field ^ Bill Boyd - The Literacy Advisor | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
One of the more interesting aspects of Pickett and Wilkinson’s study however, is that, in those countries with the greatest wealth inequality, not only do those at the bottom end of the social scale suffer poorer outcomes, almost everyone does, including those from more affluent backgrounds. Conversely, in more equal societies, everyone benefits:

“It is often assumed that the desire to raise national standards of performance in fields such as education is quite separate from the desire to reduce educational inequalities within a society. But the truth may be almost the opposite of this. It looks as if the achievement of higher national standards of educational performance may actually DEPEND on reducing the gradient in educational achievement in each country . Douglas Willms, Professor of Education at the University of New Brunswick, Canada, has provided striking illustrations of this. In Figure 8.4 (see below) we show the relationship between adult literacy scores from the International Adult Literacy Survey and their parents’ level of education in Finland, Belgium, the UK and the USA. This figure suggests that even if your parents are well-educated – and so presumably of high social status – the country you live in makes some difference to your educational success. But for those lower down the social scale with less well-educated parents, it makes a very much larger difference.


JIm Lerman's insight:


Well documented and well presented research on the effects of inequality within and across societies. How many times do these same types of findings have to be reported in all types of settings before policies change? 

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Google Forms: Sort Responses Backwards ^ Teacher Tech ^ by Alice Keeler

Google Forms: Sort Responses Backwards ^ Teacher Tech ^ by Alice Keeler | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
When students fill out a Google Form the responses go to the bottom. If you are using the same Google Form repeatedly this can make for a lot of scrolling.
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Jumping into the 21st Century: One Teacher’s Account ^ Mind/Shift ^ by Tina Barseghian

Jumping into the 21st Century: One Teacher’s Account ^ Mind/Shift ^ by Tina Barseghian | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
“I think all teachers must have times when they’re faced with the decision to continue on the safe road that they know, or radically depart on a way that they believe to be better, but the specific route and outcomes are unknown,” writes Shelley Wright on the excellent educators blog Voices from a Learning Revolution.

“How often do we want the end result — engaged, articulate, deep discussions — without being willingly to do the hard work to get there?”
With honesty and in great detail, Wright talks about how she decided to jump in with both feet to completely reorganize her class structure and the way she teaches. Wright shifted the teacher-centered, textbook-based class to a collaborative learning space, encouraging students to research units individually and in groups, and to help each other. They even created their own online textbook.

How did it go? She discusses the first few halting steps:
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Why Compassion Is a Better Managerial Tactic than Toughness ^ Harvard Business Review ^ by Emma Seppala

Why Compassion Is a Better Managerial Tactic than Toughness ^ Harvard Business Review ^ by Emma Seppala | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"The question is:  How should we react when an employee is not performing well or makes a mistake?

"Frustration is of course the natural response — and one we all can identify with. Especially if the mistake hurts an important project or reflects badly upon us.

T"he traditional approach is to reprimand the employee in some way.


"The hope is that some form of punishment will be beneficial: it will teach the employee a lesson. Expressing our frustration also may relieve us of the stress and anger caused by the mistake. Finally, it may help the rest of the team stay on their toes to avoid making future errors.

"Some managers, however, choose a different response when confronted by an underperforming employee: compassion and curiosity.  Not that a part of them isn’t frustrated or exasperated — maybe they still worry about how their employee’s mistakes will reflect back on them — but they are somehow able to suspend judgment and may even be able to use the moment to do a bit of coaching."

"What does research say is best? The more compassionate response will get you more powerful results."

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5 Major Ways Freelancers Will Change The Economy By 2040 ^ Fast Company ^ by Vivian Giang

5 Major Ways Freelancers Will Change The Economy By 2040 ^ Fast Company ^ by Vivian Giang | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By 2040, the American economy will be "scarcely recognizable," according to a new report published by the Roosevelt Institute and the Kauffman Foundation.

We’ve seen glimpses of the looming changes already: freelancers now make up 34%—that's 53 million people—of the U.S. workforce, according to a 2014 survey by Edelman Berland. In the next 25 years, this shift will accelerate in a major way towards entrepreneurship, 


The report, which includes insights from 30 economists, technologists, policy makers, and entrepreneurs, focuses on four main topics: the future of work, the future of technology, the future of entrepreneurship, and the future of inequality. Below are five changes to expect from America's next economy:

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Taking My Parents to College ^ NY Times ^ by Jennine Capo Crucet

Taking My Parents to College ^ NY Times ^ by Jennine Capo Crucet | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
IT was a simple question, but we couldn’t find the answer in any of the paperwork the college had sent. How long was my family supposed to stay for orientation? This was 1999, so Google wasn’t really a verb yet, and we were a low-income family (according to my new school) without regular Internet access.

I was a first-generation college student as well as the first in our family to be born in America — my parents were born in Cuba — and we didn’t yet know that families were supposed to leave pretty much right after they unloaded your stuff from the car.
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A 21st-Century Migrant’s Essentials: Food, Shelter, Smartphone ^ NY Times ^ by Matthew Brunwasser

A 21st-Century Migrant’s Essentials: Food, Shelter, Smartphone ^ NY Times ^ by Matthew Brunwasser | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
For the tens of thousands of migrants flooding into Europe, smartphone maps, global positioning apps, social media and WhatsApp have become essential tools.


Jim Lerman's insight:

Fascinating article!

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11 1/2 Free Tools for Testing Website Accessibility ^ 3Play Media

11 1/2 Free Tools for Testing Website Accessibility ^ 3Play Media | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

FREE WEBINAR, THURS. OCT 1, 2 PM EASTERN


"In this webinar, David Berman, the #1 rated speaker on the topic of web accessibility standards as well as an international expert in the field, will share with you the best tools his team uses when auditing and testing websites and documents. Having an excellent test regimen is a crucial part of online accessibility, and David has found the best tools to fit your workflow, platforms, and competencies… so you don’t have to!"

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Big data is pushing 3D printing to its tipping point | The Big Data Hub

Big data is pushing 3D printing to its tipping point | The Big Data Hub | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"A tipping point is the crucial junction after which evolution becomes revolution. From that moment, an object or process takes on new characteristics and begins transforming events. Often, however, several enabling technologies must also be developed and then incorporated into the solution.

"3D printing has been around for so long that several key US patents have already run their term. Around 2009, printing patents expired that covered “fused deposition modeling” using plastics, and in 2014, original patents on “selective laser sintering,” which covered innovative printing using steel, aluminum and copper, also ran out. With these technologies now freely available, products can now be printed that were once difficult to imagine, let alone create."


Jim Lerman's insight: 

In a rather brief article, Hughes, an IBM executive, accumulates evidence that we may, indeed, be on the eve of a "second industrial revolution. A stimulating, good read.

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This is CS50 (AP) with David Malan - November Learning Conference

This is CS50 (AP) with David Malan - November Learning Conference | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
David Malan presents at BLC15 to offer a glimpse of CS50 (AP), an adaption of CS50 for high schools that will satisfy the new AP CS Principles curriculum. CS50 is Harvard University’s introductory course for majors and non-majors alike, a one-semester amalgam of courses generally known as CS1 and CS2.

As of 2014, CS50 is Harvard’s largest course with over 800 students, up from 132 in 2006, and those “less comfortable” now compose the course’s largest demographic. In 2015, CS50 will also be offered in parallel at Yale University. We present in this talk what we have done and why we have done it. We look at CS50’s online counterpart, CS50x, Harvard College’s first course to be offered on an even larger scale via edX with nearly 500,000 registrants.
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New Teachers, Let's Get Better Together ^ Teaching Channel ^ by Lily Jones

New Teachers, Let's Get Better Together ^ Teaching Channel ^ by Lily Jones | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Are you a new teacher interested in being part of an innovative, collaborative pilot on creating classroom culture? Join us here!
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Mediabreaker: remix tool to foster the next generation of Jon Stewarts ^ boingboing ^ by Emily Long

Mediabreaker: remix tool to foster the next generation of Jon Stewarts ^ boingboing ^ by Emily Long | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
The question of who makes the media matters, in part because all of us are limited by our own experiences. I have only ever experienced the world as a white woman, and that is a different experience than if I were African-American or male, which barely scratches the surface when it comes to all the things I am not and will never be. So when the controls of a mass media corporation roll up to a group of people who all look the same, can we be surprised by a lack of variety in media narratives? How can mainstream media be expected to innovate in an atmosphere of sameness?

Fortunately, there are more efforts now to bring traditionally marginalized communities into the fields of media and technology. Nonprofits abound which focus in getting girls, low-income youth or people of color into coding, robotics and various STEM fields. Diversifying voices in media is a step in diversifying media content, but it is only that – one step. As Sonia Livingstone, professor at the London School of Economics, said in a 2014 report, “Coding is a great idea but it’s not enough. Decoding today’s media - to recognise misleading and exploitative content, to appreciate what is available and to grasp the emerging opportunities - doesn’t come automatically or naturally. This is a time to strengthen media education.” If we can’t teach people to identify misinformation or stereotypes and demand better from media, then the same forces that have contributed to our current lack of diversity will keep their stranglehold on power and popular narrative. Harmful media messaging must be called out for it to end, and the producers behind that content need to understand that it’s no longer acceptable.
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Can We Interest You In Teaching? ^ NY Times ^ Frank Bruni

Can We Interest You In Teaching? ^ NY Times ^ Frank Bruni | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
How do we make teaching more rewarding, so that it beckons to not only enough college graduates but to a robust share of the very best of them?
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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, August 12, 2:44 PM

The press beats up on teachers and becomes sagacious in deciding what programs work or not.  Those of us who disagree are literally run out of town, or made to suffer because we have a different opinion . The press brought us Michelle Rhee , TF

M. Philip Oliver's curator insight, August 12, 5:42 PM

Thanks Frank Bruni! We need teachers!

Daniel Christian's curator insight, August 13, 8:47 AM

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A New Literacy: Making Connections in Electronic Environments - YouTube

"This introduction video is an overview of a discussion about communication through electronic media. It explores and discusses internet communication, text messaging, social networks, and other electronic media: some of their uses, some myths created around them, and some ideas about how they can be used. Some of the video is based on the works of Dr. David Crystal, professor of linguistics and author. "


Jim Lerman's insight:

A succinct summation of the changed communication/information environment in which we live. Nicely done, although a bit Ango-centric.

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Nancy Jones's curator insight, August 12, 9:01 AM

An interesting little video to spark discussion at a faculty meeting at the beginning of the year. Maybe we assauge the fears of those we are still reluctant because of their own discomfort with the medium.

 

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Teaching Machines and Turing Machines: The History of the Future of Labor and Learning ^ Hack.edu ^ by Audrey Watters

Teaching Machines and Turing Machines: The History of the Future of Labor and Learning ^ Hack.edu ^ by Audrey Watters | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"What’s striking about these early 20th century predictions is that Thorndike set the tone, over one hundred years ago, for machines taking over instruction. And while he was wrong about films replacing textbooks, Edison was largely right that the arguments in support of education technology, of instructional technology would frequently be made in terms of “efficiency.” Much of the history of education technology, indeed the history of education itself, in the twentieth century onward involves this push for “efficiency.” To replace, to supplant – to move from textbooks to film or from chalkboards to interactive whiteboards or from face-to-face lecture halls to MOOCs or from human teachers to robots – comes in the name of “progress,” where progress demands “efficiency.”


Jim Lerman's insight:

This talk was delivered on August 10, 2015 and posted on the 11th. What a good example for conference producers.


Watters continues to impress with her passion, depth of thinking, and scholarship. The accompanying slides must have been a lot of fun to create, and the quotations they illustrate are so spot on. I would love to see her Diigo, Delicious, or Evernote account...however she collects her stuff.

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Role-Playing Game Upends College Lecture and Ignites Fire in Students ^ Mind/Shift

Role-Playing Game Upends College Lecture and Ignites Fire in Students ^ Mind/Shift | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"The excerpt below is from the book “Minds on Fire: How Role-Immersion Games Transform College,” by Barnard University professor Mark C. Carnes.

"Everyone responds to a role- immersion game in a different way. Some are stimulated by the competition, others by the imaginative reach, and others by the absurdity of it all. Gilberto G. Jimenez is among those who mostly enjoy its competitiveness."

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Teens, Technology and Friendships ^ Pew Research Center ^ by Amanda Lenhart

Teens, Technology and Friendships ^ Pew Research Center ^ by Amanda Lenhart | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
For today’s teens, friendships can start digitally: 57% of teens have met a new friend online. Social media and online gameplay are the most common digital venues for meeting friends

For American teens, making friends isn’t just confined to the school yard, playing field or neighborhood – many are making new friends online. Fully 57% of teens ages 13 to 17 have made a new friend online, with 29% of teens indicating that they have made more than five new friends in online venues. Most of these friendships stay in the digital space; only 20% of all teens have met an online friend in person.
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