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20 Game-Changing Technology Trends That Will Create Both Global Disruption and Opportunity | Big Think

20 Game-Changing Technology Trends That Will Create Both Global Disruption and Opportunity | Big Think | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Daniel Burris

 

"Over the next five short years the following game-changing technologies will transform how we sell, market, communicate, collaborate, educate, train, innovate, and much more."

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:: The 4th Era ::
Exploration of the new era in human history marked by invention of the Internet
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Introducing this work

Introducing this work | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

For the purposes of this Scoop.it site, the history of human interaction with information may be divided into 4 eras. The first (spoken) era ended with the invention of writing around 3000-4000 BC. The second era ended with the invention of the printing press in 1440. The third era ended, and the fourth began, with the invention of the Internet (depending how one defines its operational beginning) somewhere between 1969 and 1982. We now exist early, but decidedly, in the fourth era.

 

All readers may not agree with this interpretation of the history of information, especially with the division and numbering of the eras. That is not the main point. Rather, it is that humankind is presently existing in an era distinctly different from the one that preceded it -- that in fact, this new era is accompanied with, and characterized by, a new - and quite different - information landscape. This new Internet information landscape will challenge, disrupt, and overpower the print-oriented one that came before it. It will not completely obliterate that which preceded it, but it will render it to a subsidiary, rather than primary, level of influence.

 

Just as the printing press altered humanity's relationship with information, thereby resulting in massive restructuring of political, religious, economic, social, educational, cultural, scientific, and other realms of life; so too will the advance of digital technology occasion analogous transformations in the corresponding universe of present and future human activity.

 

This site will concern itself primarily with how K-20 education in the US, and the people who comprise its constituencies, may be affected by this transformative movement from one era to the next. All ideas considered here appear, to me at least, to impact the learning enterprise in some way. Accordingly, this work looks at the present and the future through a lens that is predominantly, but far from entirely, a digital one. -JL

 

Opinions expressed, scooped, or copied in this Scoop.it topic are my own, or a result of my own judgment, and should in no way be understood to reflect those of my employer.

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Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:43 AM
Jim - I like your perspective. Great subject matter here!
Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:46 AM
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Azania Nduli-AmaZulu UbuntuPsychology.ORG's curator insight, July 8, 2013 6:24 PM

Beautiful!

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Civic Media Project: Civic Media Project

Civic Media Project: Civic Media Project | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

via The Scout Report

 

"Civic media is the practice of using media and technology to promote a collective good. The Civic Media Project (CMP) "is a collection of short case studies from scholars and practitioners from all over the world that range from the descriptive to the analytical, from the single tool to the national program, from the enthusiastic to the critical." These case studies are written by scholars across a number of fields, including journalism, digital media, political science, and education. Case studies highlight civic media projects in four Sections: Play + Creativity; Systems + Designs; Learning + Engagement; and Community + Action. Highlighted projects include Presenting our Perspectives on Philly Youth News (POPPYN), a youth- produced TV News show and Aliens on Campus, an Alternative Reality Game at the University of Western Cape designed to address gaps in digital literacy education. Many of these projects focus on youth empowerment and education, so CMP may especially be of interest to youth workers and educators in alternative or out-of-school settings."

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Computer Science in High School Graduation Requirements: 2016 Update

Computer Science in High School Graduation Requirements: 2016 Update | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
This Education Trends report is an update to the original report released in April 2015 and explores state policies that allow or require districts to apply computer science coursework toward completion of high school graduation requirements in math, science or foreign language.
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, September 27, 8:34 PM

Thanks to Jim Lerman.

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Here’s why you’re overlooking how much VR actually matters – The Startup – Medium

Here’s why you’re overlooking how much VR actually matters – The Startup – Medium | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

“If you think about the internet as a place that made it easier to index all the information and consume them faster, VR is a place that indexes experiences and lets you consume them faster.”

 

"Of all the industries poised for disruption by virtual reality, education seems the most likely and powerful. VR experiences can teach us practical skills, immersing us not just in a lesson but in the task itself.

 

"Want to learn how to fix your toilet? Head into a VR plumbing tutorial with your exact model and see how it’s done.

 

"Want to learn photography? Load a VR experience with your camera model and practice scenes to learn perfect settings."

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Arts Integration and the Success of Disadvantaged Students: A Research Evaluation

Arts Integration and the Success of Disadvantaged Students: A Research Evaluation | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Does arts integration contribute to student success for disadvantaged student populations? The introduction to this article compares students’ academic performance and arts education in countries outperforming the United States on the recent Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) and Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS) and makes the argument for using arts integration as a way to teach the Common Core standards and align instruction to the Universal Design for Learning principles. This evaluation of research helps to support the evidence base by examining the quality of studies published between 1995 and 2011 investigating the use of arts integration with disadvantaged student populations, including economically disadvantaged students, English language learners, and students with disabilities. Four hundred fifty-three studies were explored, resulting in the inclusion of forty-four studies in this analysis. Studies were categorized as the following: single art integration, multi-arts integration, effects of arts integration on students with disabilities, or effects of arts integration on school climate. Studies were evaluated for their research design, implementation, and effects, and results depicted positive effects and potentially positive effects. Policy implications and suggestions for future research using the author's proposed theoretical framework are also discussed.
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Open to influence: what counts as academic influence in scholarly networked Twitter participation

Open to influence: what counts as academic influence in scholarly networked Twitter participation | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Within the academy, signals of a scholar's academic influence are made manifest in indices like the h-index, which rank output. In open scholarly networks, however, signals of influence are less codified, and the ways in which they are enacted and understood have yet to be articulated. Yet the influence scholars cultivate in open networked publics intersects with institutional academia in grant-required measures of ‘public impact’, in media visibility, and in keynote and job opportunities. How do scholars within open networks judge whether another scholar's signals are credible or worthy of engagement? What counts as academic influence on a platform like Twitter? This paper concludes that scholars employ complex logics of influence to assess the networked profiles and behaviors of peers and unknown entities. Significantly, these logics of influence depart from the codified terms of rank and bibliometric indexing on which conventional academic influence is judged. While some are numeric – participants recognized relatively large-scale accounts as a general signal of influence – recognizability and commonality are as important as or more important than quantifiable measures or credentials. The paper suggests that the impression of capacity for meaningful contribution is key to cultivating influence and the regard of actively networked peers.

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Class of 2016 - MacArthur Foundation

Class of 2016 - MacArthur Foundation | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
“While our communities, our nation, and our world face both historic and emerging challenges, these 23 extraordinary individuals give us ample reason for hope. They are breaking new ground in areas of public concern, in the arts, and in the sciences, often in unexpected ways. Their creativity, dedication, and impact inspire us all.”

—MacArthur President Julia Stasch
Jim Lerman's insight:

Background on each of 2016's 23 honorees.

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Jim Lerman's curator insight, September 22, 8:25 PM

Background on each of 2016's 23 honorees.

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New technology promises to wirelessly read human emotion

New technology promises to wirelessly read human emotion | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
It's all about measuring the human body, and the physiological signals that change along with our emotions. In the past, this has been done with electrocardiography (ECG) monitors — electrodes strapped to the body.

But a team at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) has built a device that can do this without wires. They call it EQ-Radio, and in a lot of ways, the device is similar to a Wi-Fi router. 


It sends out a wireless signal. When the signal reaches a human body, it bounces back into the device. By measuring these reflections — the way the human body interacts with the wireless signals — the device can tell if you're excited, happy, angry or sad.

That's the major breakthrough here (and possibly the creepy part) — the ability for a computer to recognize emotion at a distance, without wires — and potentially, without you knowing about it.
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, September 22, 9:39 PM

More nifty stuff! Thanks to Jim Lerman.

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What is Four-Dimensional Education?

What is Four-Dimensional Education? | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
According to Center for Curriculum Redesign (CCR) founder Charles Fadel, education is “falling behind its mission to prepare students for the future: a world that’s increasingly volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous.” Curriculum was significantly redesigned in the late 1800’s when societal and human capital needs demanded it. But the 21st century bears little resemblance to the past. WHAT should we teach young people in an age where Dr. Google has an answer for everything? Humans are living longer; the traditional professions disappear while new ones are created; international mobility is drastically increasing population diversity; terrorism, environmental threats and inequality need our collective attention; and robots and gene editing are coming, requiring us to re-examine the very core of what it means to be human. WHAT does all that we know now, and all that we still can only imagine, mean for Curriculum?

Via basil60, Skylly_W, Arthur Correia, Edumorfosis, Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D.
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Nathalie Ferret's curator insight, September 23, 4:22 AM
"In order to deepen and enhance the learning in these three dimensions — Knowledge, Skills, and Character qualities–there is an important additional fourth dimension needed for a fully comprehensive twenty-first century education: Meta-Learning (often called learning to learn–the internal processes by which we reflect on and adapt our learning)"
Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, September 23, 6:55 AM
Useful post, presenting an interesting concept. For those who speak Portuguese or Spanish and are interested in continuing education, please visit http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com
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Beyond Institutions : Personal Learning in a Networked World By Stephen Downes

Network EDFE Seminar Series, London, England, London School of Economics. In this presentation I look at the needs and demands of people seeking learnin

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Javier Sánchez Bolado, steve batchelder
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Sugata Mitra appeals to education decision makers to allow use of the Internet during exams

Sugata Mitra appeals to education decision makers to allow use of the Internet during exams | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

The future of pedagogy has got to allow spontaneous order as a new method in children’s education in the presence of the Internet. Internet must permeate the education system.



Via Nik Peachey, Bibhya Sharma
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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, February 20, 7:35 AM

Use of Internet during exams

Bibhya Sharma's curator insight, February 21, 8:08 PM

This is inevitable. The education systems need to prepare accordingly and be ready to embrace the concept. The way we assess needs to change dramatically. 

Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, September 21, 6:12 AM
Is this an argument we need to seriously consider?
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Can Grit Be Grown?

Can Grit Be Grown? | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Tenacity matters so greatly because, as she explains, “effort counts twice.” To get to any significant achievement requires a multiplication of skill by effort, and to develop and master that prerequisite skill requires a multiplication of talent by (again) effort. So sure, talent is in the equation—but effort is there twice. Though the research mostly remains in the narrative’s background, her arguments are regularly supported with appropriate evidence where it exists, and she is careful to clarify when she’s going “off-evidence” to provide speculation.

So can you grow your grit over time? Yes, certainly.  Dr. Duckworth addresses this question forthrightly, citing important longitudinal research from Dr. Brent Roberts to the effect that qualities associated with grit “do, in fact, change” over time.

How? In a series of breezy and engaging chapters, she offers four core suggestions for how we might grow our own grit from within:

Interest:  People grittily pursue what interests them. But it is not as easy as saying “follow your passion.” One must carefully experiment, try various activities and try to stick to them for periods of time in order to discover where indeed your true interest lies.
Practice: This is the next element of strengthening grit–but it doesn’t mean just any kind of practice. Determined, intentional, goal-setting, progress monitoring, extremely effortful practice is required What’s known as “deliberate practice.”
Purpose: For many of her gritty exemplars, she notices the work they are so committed to is work on behalf of others—work for a public purpose and social good (though there are exceptions).
Hope: Drawing from her mentor Marty Seligman, she closes this section arguing for the value of optimism as part of the grit formula, and gives particular attention to the Dweckian “growth mindset” as an essential aspect of hope.
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8 Common Innovation Traps (SSIR)

8 Common Innovation Traps (SSIR) | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
In our SSIR article “The Re-Emerging Art of Funding Innovation” last year, we highlighted many specific approaches that innovation funders are now using. But we find that many grantmakers still end up falling into one or more “innovation traps”—common mistakes that can prevent them from succeeding as they try to find and fund breakthrough social change.
Some of these traps are challenges related to execution and implementation; others are more conceptual, rooted in the way organizations think about what innovation is and what it can achieve. As you read through the eight common innovation traps below, ask yourself whether your organization has faced one or more of these problems, and consider sharing your experience in the comments.
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Andrew Sullivan: My Distraction Sickness — and Yours

Andrew Sullivan: My Distraction Sickness — and Yours | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
An endless bombardment of news and gossip and images has rendered us manic information addicts. It broke me. It might break you, too.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Jim Lerman
Jim Lerman's insight:

I've been meaning to upload this since it appeared about 3 weeks ago in New York Magazine. Terrific piece, well worth reading.

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Jim Lerman's curator insight, September 30, 2:28 PM

I've been meaning to upload this since it appeared about 3 weeks ago in New York Magazine. Terrific piece, well worth reading.

Jim Lerman's curator insight, September 30, 2:30 PM

I've been meaning to upload this since it appeared about 3 weeks ago in New York Magazine. Terrific piece, well worth reading.

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Four Fantastic Feedback Tools for Google Docs

Four Fantastic Feedback Tools for Google Docs | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"As educators we are always looking for better ways to connect with our students especially when providing feedback on their work. In this video and post we explore four fantastic tools to provide feedback that is more detailed, engaging, and personal. Tools include Google Doc text comments, voice comments with Read&Write for Google, video feedback with Screencastify, and natural handwriting feedback with the Google Classroom mobile app."

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Revisionist History 

Revisionist History  | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Description by The Scout Report

 

"Fans of popular writer and New Yorker columnist Malcolm Gladwell - author of The Tipping Pointand Outliers - as well as those generally curious about social trends, art, contemporary issues, and history, will want to check out the new podcast, Revisionist History. Gladwell released the first season - ten episodes in total - during the summer of 2016 and will return with more episodes in Spring 2017. Those interested in educational policy may be especially interested that Gladwell's first season features a three-episode series dedicated to questions of human potential and educational opportunity. Other episodes address topics as diverse as Walt Chamberlain's famous underhanded free throw, the role of satire in our political process, and the complex findings from a 1965 Pentagon study in Saigon about the effects of U.S. bombing on North Vietnamese citizens. On this website, visitors can listen to all ten podcasts and check out accompanying resources, including primary documents, videos, and related books."

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Empathy among students in engineering programmes

Empathy among students in engineering programmes | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Engineers face challenges when they are to manage project groups and be leaders for organisations because such positions demand skills in social competence and empathy. Previous studies have shown that engineers have low degrees of social competence skills. In this study, the level of empathy as measured by the four subscales of the Interpersonal Reactivity Index, perspective taking, fantasy, empathic distress and empathic concern, among engineering students was compared to students in health care profession programmes. Participants were undergraduate students at Linköping University, 365 students from four different health care profession programmes and 115 students from two different engineering programmes. When the empathy measures were corrected for effects of sex, engineering students from one of the programmes had lower empathy than psychology and social worker students on the fantasy and perspective-taking subscales. These results raise questions regarding opportunities for engineering students to develop their empathic abilities. It is important that engineering students acquire both theoretical and practical knowledge and skills regarding empathy.
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Career education that works: an economic analysis using the British Cohort Study

Career education that works: an economic analysis using the British Cohort Study | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
There is significant policy interest in the issue of young people’s fractured transitions into the labour market. Many scholars and policy-makers believe that changes in the education system and labour market over recent decades have created a complex world for young people; and that this can partly be addressed by enhanced career education while individuals are at school. However, the literature lacks in-depth quantitative analysis making use of longitudinal data. This paper draws on the British Cohort Study 1970 to investigate the link between career talks by external speakers and employment outcomes, and finds some evidence that young people who participated in more career talks at age 14–16 enjoyed a wage premium 10 years later at age 26. The correlation is statistically significant on average across all students who receive talks at age 14–15; but remains the case for 15–16 year olds only if they also described the talks as very helpful.
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HP Just Made It Impossible to Use Those El-Cheapo Ink Cartridges You Like

HP Just Made It Impossible to Use Those El-Cheapo Ink Cartridges You Like | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
IT’S NOT EASY to be in the printer and ink business these days. Revenue is down. Obsolescence looms. Knock-off cartridges are a cheap and easy alternative. HP’s apparent solution? DRM. Great.

Just to be clear, this isn’t a solution for you. It’s a solution for them. Got an OfficeJet, OfficeJet Pro, or Office Jet Pro X printer? As of last week, reasonably priced third-party ink cartridges no longer work. For a company like, say, 123inkt, the Dutch outfit that sells HP-compatible cartridges and first noticed the change, it’s DRMaggedon.

HP’s at least upfront about it. Brazen, even!

“The purpose of this update is to protect HP’s innovations and intellectual property,” the company told WIRED. Which is true. If only it protected HP’s customers as well.
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Detecting emotions with wireless signals

Detecting emotions with wireless signals | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
As many a relationship book can tell you, understanding someone else’s emotions can be a difficult task. Facial expressions aren’t always reliable: A smile can conceal frustration, while a poker face might mask a winning hand.
But what if technology could tell us how someone is really feeling?
Researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) have developed “EQ-Radio,” a device that can detect a person’s emotions using wireless signals.
By measuring subtle changes in breathing and heart rhythms, EQ-Radio is 87 percent accurate at detecting if a person is excited, happy, angry or sad — and can do so without on-body sensors.
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What Apple could do with emotion-reading technology?

What Apple could do with emotion-reading technology? | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
​It looks like Apple hopes your emotions are written all over your face.

As first reported last week by the Wall Street Journal, the technology giant has acquired Emotient, a startup that uses artifical intelligence to specialize in "emotion detection."

CBC Radio technology columnist Dan Misener explains the coming wave of emotionally aware computers.
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The Beginner's Guide to Artificial Intelligence For Educators - A.J. JULIANI

The Beginner's Guide to Artificial Intelligence For Educators - A.J. JULIANI | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
This is the second in a 7-part series on the Future of Learning. You can read the first post here, and join the discussion on our Facebook page: The Future

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Vladimir Kukharenko, Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D.
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Far more plastics floating in oceans than thought

Far more plastics floating in oceans than thought | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Plastic pollution in the ocean frequently appears as seabird guts filled with cigarette lighters and bottle caps, marine mammals entangled in fishing gear and drifting plastic bags mimicking a gelatinous meal. Last year, a study estimated that around eight million metric tons of our plastic waste enter the oceans from land each year.


But where this plastic ends up and what form it takes is a mystery. Most of our waste consists of everyday items such as bottles, wrappers, straws or bags. Yet the vast majority of debris found floating far offshore is much smaller: it’s broken-down fragments smaller than your pinky fingernail, termed microplastic.


In a newly published study, we showed that this floating microplastic accounts for only about 1% of the plastic waste entering the ocean from land in a single year. To get this number – estimated to be between 93,000 and 236,000 metric tons – we used all available measurements of floating microplastic together with three different numerical ocean circulation models.


Our new estimate of floating microplastic is up to 37 times higher than previous estimates. That’s equivalent to the mass of more than 1,300 blue whales.


The increased estimate is due in part to the larger data set – we assembled more than 11,000 measurements of microplastics collected in plankton nets since the 1970s. In addition, the data were standardized to account for differences in sampling conditions. For example, it has been shown that trawls carried out during strong winds tend to capture fewer floating microplastics than during calm conditions. That’s because winds blowing on the sea surface create turbulence that pushes plastics down to tens of meters depth, out of reach of surface-trawling nets. Our statistical model takes such differences into account.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Bibhya Sharma
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Teaching Adolescents
To Become Learners:: The Role of Noncognitive Factors in Shaping School
Performance: A Critical Literature Review

Teaching Adolescents<br/>To Become Learners:: The Role of Noncognitive Factors in Shaping School<br/>Performance: A Critical Literature Review | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

An outstanding research study from the University of Chicago which identifies key noncognitive factors that shape school performance. Lead author is Camille Farrington. Very helpful work. -JL

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The Re-Emerging Art of Funding Innovation (SSIR)

The Re-Emerging Art of Funding Innovation (SSIR) | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Over the past few years, a small group of funders have begun to return to their roots by deliberately reintroducing innovation into their philanthropic processes and portfolios. They seek out ideas with transformative potential, take risks on less proven approaches, open themselves up to exploring new solutions, and recognize that innovation requires flexibility, iteration, and failure.


"For more than a decade, the Monitor Institute3 has been working with many of these modern-day innovation funders—including the W. K. Kellogg Foundation, Rockefeller Foundation, David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, New Profit Inc., and Acumen. Over the course of our work, we have interviewed many of the world’s leading innovation strategists, corporate innovation specialists, venture capitalists, and social entrepreneurs to help us build a picture of what it means to find and fund social innovation.

Transformation and Experimentation

"Funding innovation starts with a fundamental shift in mindset. Innovation funders intentionally trade off probability of success in return for greater potential impact. Instead of just supporting proven, incremental solutions, they focus on transformation—investing in approaches that may have a higher risk of failure, but the potential to be lasting and truly game changing if they succeed. “When you’re doing innovation, the first question is not ‘Is this going to work?’ but rather, ‘If it works, would it matter?’” says Eric Toone, the former principal deputy director of the US Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA-E).

 

"In addition to distributing bed nets to reduce the spread of malaria, for example, an innovation funder might also pursue research to genetically alter mosquitos so they can’t transfer the parasite (an effort the Gates Foundation is now actually exploring).4 With these types of high-risk, high-reward bets, the impact from one or two big, transformational successes in a portfolio can justify the opportunity cost of many failures. The approach is similar to venture capital, where the outsized returns of a single “home run” investment can offset nine or ten less profitable enterprises."

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When Innovation Goes Wrong (SSIR)

When Innovation Goes Wrong (SSIR) | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
For the past several years, we have been studying social enterprises in order to determine what enables them to achieve high levels of impact. Innovation, we have concluded, is just one part of a larger social impact creation process. Indeed, we have found that innovation plays a minor—yet very specific—role in allowing highly successful social enterprises to deliver solutions at an appropriate scale. In examining less successful organizations, meanwhile, we have found that what holds them back is not an inability to innovate but a failure to embed their innovation efforts within a robust process for translating those efforts into impact.


"Throughout the social impact creation process, there are a number of ways that innovation can go wrong. We use the term “innovation pathologies” to describe these all-too-common missteps. Organizations that actively pursue innovation but fall short of achieving impact invariably suffer from one or more pathologies. These organizations typically have a flawed understanding of how innovation works. As a result, they develop habits and practices that render their innovation efforts unproductive.

 

"Identifying these pathologies, we argue, will help social enterprises to generate more impact from their investments in innovation. In this article, we set forth a model for understanding the relationship between innovation and impact, and we provide a way to diagnose the pathologies that interfere with that relationship. We also offer insight into how organizations can counter these pathologies by developing innovation practices that optimize their effectiveness."

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