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Unorthodox math lessons add up to real gains at Dana Middle School in Hawthorne | dailybreeze.com

Unorthodox math lessons add up to real gains at Dana Middle School in Hawthorne | dailybreeze.com | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Rob Kunzia

 

"Much of what you thought you knew about math class has been turned on its head at Dana Middle School in the Wiseburn School District.

 

"Seventh- and eighth-graders at the west Hawthorne school don't really use textbooks or do much in the way of homework. The teachers rarely spend more than 10 minutes on any given lecture. At the beginning of class, instead of urging kids to quiet down, the teachers try to get them riled up.

 

"If it all seems a little strange, the method of teaching - developed by researchers at Loyola Marymount University - also might offer a glimpse into what math instruction will look like in the future. At Dana, it has produced striking results.

 

"In two years, the share of eighth-graders scoring proficient or better in algebra at the school has more than doubled, from 27 percent to 62 percent. Also, a strong majority of students at the school - 62 percent - now cite math as their favorite subject."

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:: The 4th Era ::
Exploration of the new era in human history marked by invention of the Internet
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Introducing this work

Introducing this work | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

For the purposes of this Scoop.it site, the history of human interaction with information may be divided into 4 eras. The first (spoken) era ended with the invention of writing around 3000-4000 BC. The second era ended with the invention of the printing press in 1440. The third era ended, and the fourth began, with the invention of the Internet (depending how one defines its operational beginning) somewhere between 1969 and 1982. We now exist early, but decidedly, in the fourth era.

 

All readers may not agree with this interpretation of the history of information, especially with the division and numbering of the eras. That is not the main point. Rather, it is that humankind is presently existing in an era distinctly different from the one that preceded it -- that in fact, this new era is accompanied with, and characterized by, a new - and quite different - information landscape. This new Internet information landscape will challenge, disrupt, and overpower the print-oriented one that came before it. It will not completely obliterate that which preceded it, but it will render it to a subsidiary, rather than primary, level of influence.

 

Just as the printing press altered humanity's relationship with information, thereby resulting in massive restructuring of political, religious, economic, social, educational, cultural, scientific, and other realms of life; so too will the Internet occasion analogous transformations in the corresponding universe of present and future human activity.

 

This site will concern itself primarily with how K-20 education in the US, and the people who comprise its constituencies, may be affected by this transformative movement from one era to the next. All ideas considered here appear, to me at least, to impact the learning enterprise in some way. Accordingly, this work looks at the present and the future through a lens that is predominantly, but far from entirely, a digital one. -JL


Opinions expressed, scooped, or copied in this Scoop.it topic are my own and should in no way be understood to reflect those of my employer.

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Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:43 AM
Jim - I like your perspective. Great subject matter here!
Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:46 AM
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Azania Nduli-AmaZulu UbuntuPsychology.ORG's curator insight, July 8, 2013 6:24 PM

Beautiful!

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In the U.S., a Growing Recognition: College Isn't for Everyone :: Lauren Camera

In the U.S., a Growing Recognition: College Isn't for Everyone :: Lauren Camera | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"The GED Testing Service recently decided to lower the passing score for its high school equivalency exam, making thousands of students newly eligible for a GED credential.


"The decision to change the passing score – from 150 to 145 – wasn’t entirely surprising. In 2014, the service overhauled the test to better align to the Common Core State Standards, a set of challenging academic benchmarks representing what students should know by the time they finish each grade, including by the time they graduate high school.


"As was widely advertised, the test became more difficult, and fewer students passed – a lot fewer, in fact. The passing rate for the 223,000 students who took the GED exams in 2014 – the first year in which the revised test was administered – was 62.8 percent, down from nearly 76 percent in 2013.

"Most education policy experts say the GED Testing Service was right to drop its passing score. After all, they say, passing simply equates to earning a high school degree, and doesn’t necessarily mean those who do are prepared for college-level work.

“It’s not meant to indicate that a child is ready to succeed in college because a high school diploma doesn’t mean a child is ready for college,” says Michael Petrilli, president of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, a conservative-leaning education think tank.

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Are Low Income Families Connecting to the Internet? Yes, but Not Easily, Survey Finds. (EdSurge News) :: Blake Montgomery

Are Low Income Families Connecting to the Internet? Yes, but Not Easily, Survey Finds. (EdSurge News) :: Blake Montgomery | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Communities and districts across America lack basic Internet connections. According to nonprofit EducationSuperHighway’s "State of the States" report, 23 percent of American school districts don’t meet the 100 kbps standards. Those districts contain 21 million students. What can be done?
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The Day One Flint Mother Told Me The Story Of How America Poisoned Her Baby Girl :: Michael Skolnik

The Day One Flint Mother Told Me The Story Of How America Poisoned Her Baby Girl - Life Tips. - Medium
The crazy part of this story is that none of this ever had to happen. But in 2014, an inadequate Republican Governor, who is still in power today, tried to cut costs and Flint’s entire water supply was poisoned. Lead poison. Because the pipes were and continue to be the cause of the devastating poison and not the actual water, the only solution is replace all of the piping. Billions of dollars in cost and no one has given a realistic timeline for new pipes. So for now, the only option is bottles and filters. But the problem is the filters and the bottled water arrived just a few weeks ago, while the the government failed to tell the people they were being poisoned for over a year. Allegations of a cover-up. Damage done. Serious damage. Real destruction to the lives of the 99,763 Flint residents.
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Ikea to explore on-site 3D printer repair/recycle stations in new pilot program

Ikea to explore on-site 3D printer repair/recycle stations in new pilot program | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
If you’re one of those makers who is actively looking around the house for problems that can be fixed with your 3D printer, you will have probably noticed that Ikea furniture is particularly easy to combine with 3D printed components. In fact, you can also find quite a few making hacks online specifically intended for Ikea furniture, such as this 3D printed stool hack. It seems like the Swedish flat pack giant has finally picked up on this concept, as they are launching a series of pilot programs in Belgium and France where customers can bring broken furniture to Ikea repair stations for recycling or fixing with the help of a 3D printer.
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Big Data Threat Landscape — ENISA

Big Data Threat Landscape — ENISA | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
This Threat Landscape and Good Practice Guide for Big Data provides an overview of the current state of security in the Big Data area. In particular, it identifies Big Data assets, analyses exposure of these assets to threats, lists threat agents, takes into account published vulnerabilities and risks, and points to emerging good practices and new researches in the field. To this aim, ongoing community-driven efforts and publicly available information have been taken into account.


Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Big+Data...



Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, February 3, 12:04 PM
This Threat Landscape and Good Practice Guide for Big Data provides an overview of the current state of security in the Big Data area. In particular, it identifies Big Data assets, analyses exposure of these assets to threats, lists threat agents, takes into account published vulnerabilities and risks, and points to emerging good practices and new researches in the field. To this aim, ongoing community-driven efforts and publicly available information have been taken into account.


Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Big+Data...


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Teaching With YouTube: 197 Digital Channels For Learning

Teaching With YouTube: 197 Digital Channels For Learning | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Teaching With YouTube: 197 Digital Channels For Learning

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Orientacion IES HRL's curator insight, February 5, 3:49 AM

 

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Mariana Melissa Ceballos's curator insight, February 5, 9:32 AM

añada su visión ...

Jorge Jaramillo's curator insight, February 5, 10:42 AM
Alternativas de selección de material educativo para la planeación de actividades de aprendizaje. Esta es una excelente alternativa, buscando conectar a los estudiantes en el conocimiento.
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Fury Shakes the Iowa Caucuses, Boosting Ted Cruz While Slowing Hillary Clinton :: NY Times :: Michael Barbaro

Fury Shakes the Iowa Caucuses, Boosting Ted Cruz While Slowing Hillary Clinton :: NY Times :: Michael Barbaro | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Fury carried Ted Cruz to victory. And it stopped Hillary Clinton from truly claiming one.

The vote here in Iowa was a portrait of red-hot America, so disaffected that it turned to a pugilistic evangelical Republican who calls for demolition of a system saturated with corruption. And it sent a forceful message to Democratic leaders that it was unwilling to put aside its resentment of Wall Street and corporate America to crown a lifelong party insider who has amassed millions in speaking fees from the big banks.

Monday night’s results confirmed that despite the widening cultural and political fissures that have divided right and left, voters are united in an impatience, even a revulsion, at what they see as a rigged system that no longer works for them.

For Republicans, the enemy is an overreaching government, strangling their freedoms and pocketbooks. For Democrats, it is an unfair economy, shrinking their paychecks and aspirations.
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World Economic Forum Annual Meeting 2016 - all the videos

World Economic Forum Annual Meeting 2016 - all the videos | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Videos of all the sessions from the WEF, held Jan. 20-23, 2016 in Davos, Switzerland.

A great place to start for anyone wishing to identify current intellectual trends among the elite elite.

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Apple Sets Its Sights on Virtual Reality :: NY Times :: Katie Benner & Nick Wingfield

Apple Sets Its Sights on Virtual Reality :: NY Times :: Katie Benner & Nick Wingfield | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Apple has acquired an augmented reality start-up called Flyby Media and hired the former director of the Center for Human-Computer Interaction at Virginia Tech...."


"Virtual and augmented reality are growing fields in the technology industry. Supporters like Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s chief executive, have said virtual reality is the next big platform after mobile. The technology, which can make users feel transported by immersing them in different environments, has the potential to transform games, movies, social networks and work. Almost $4 billion has been invested in virtual reality start-ups since 2010, according to PitchBook, a research firm.


"Developing virtual and augmented reality technology is about creating “the next operating system,” said Linc Gasking, co-founder and chief executive of 8i, a company that creates virtual reality software. “Apple currently owns the computer in your pocket, and it needs to be part of the next big user interface if it wants to retain that ownership.”

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Testing…Testing…EDpuzzle vs. Zaption :: Lori Uemura

Testing…Testing…EDpuzzle vs. Zaption :: Lori Uemura | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Recently, or at least not too long ago, a colleague attended a workshop I did on flipped learning. After I commented that my next growth step was to try out EDpuzzle, he asked if I would also test Zaption in my classroom and let him know which I preferred. So after piloting both of these…wait! What are these tools called?! They allow you to add a lot of rich guidance and differentiation to videos. They add interactivity to video lectures. These tools place more of the learning responsibility back in the students’ laps. They allow immediate feedback for students. They provide immediate formative assessment data and analysis of that data for teachers. So, what do we call them? Can I coin a phrase here?! I like IVLP, Interactive Video Learning Platforms. I would also like to add ‘A’, because they’re pretty Awesome, but I shall refrain.

They really are both pretty awesome. I’ll outline here what I discovered when comparing the two, but either one would be a positive addition to any teacher’s toolbox, especially if you are a flipped teacher. The main difference between the two is that Edpuzzle is free and the Zaption Pro version I piloted is not. Zaption Pro is $89/year. Zaption Basic is free, but I did not test it. Here’s what I learned with the help of 60+ eighth grade guinea pigs.
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Development Impact and You: Practical Tools to Trigger & Support Social Innovation :: Nesta

Development Impact and You: Practical Tools to Trigger & Support Social Innovation :: Nesta | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
The DIY Toolkit has been especially designed for development practitioners to invent, adopt or adapt ideas that can deliver better results.


"The Development Impact and You toolkit has been specially designed for practitioners to dive straight into action. Yet the tools presented here are grounded in existing theories and practices of innovation, design, and business development.

This section offers a ‘bird’s eye view’ of the main pillars underlying the theory and management of social innovation and for each of these topics we have provided references for further reading."


Jim Lerman's insight: An extremely impressive set of tools, available in English, Spanish, and Mandarin. Set aside some serious time to dive into this wonderland.

 

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When Virtual Reality Meets Education

When Virtual Reality Meets Education | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Educators and students alike are seeking an ever-expanding immersive landscape, where students engage with teachers and each other in transformative experiences through a wide spectrum of interactive resources. In this educational reality, VR has a definitive place of value.


Via Nik Peachey
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Viljenka Savli (http://www2.arnes.si/~sopvsavl/)'s curator insight, January 27, 9:50 AM

A very good article that focuses on new possibility of VR use cross classrooms and countries. 

VR platform offerings could result in a curator or artist guiding a group of thousands around a museum exhibition or cultural site, or an actor or professor leading a virtual master class in real time with students from all over the world.

 

VR platform offerings could result in a curator or artist guiding a group of thousands around a museum exhibition or cultural site, or an actor or professor leading a virtual master class in real time with students from all over the world.

Tony Guzman's curator insight, January 28, 12:02 PM

This article shares how virtual reality is slowly showing up in education. Are we ready for this disruption?

Linda Buckmaster's curator insight, February 3, 1:38 PM

While statistics on VR use in K-­12 schools and colleges have yet to be gathered, the steady growth of the market is reflected in the surge of companies solely dedicated to providing schools with packaged educational curriculum, content, teacher training and technological tools to support VR­-based instruction in the classroom.

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Appalachian Miners Are Learning to Code :: Tim Loh

Appalachian Miners Are Learning to Code :: Tim Loh | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Jim Ratliff worked for 14 years in the mines of eastern Kentucky, drilling holes and blasting dynamite to expose the coal that has powered Appalachian life for more than a century.


"Today, he rolls into an office at 8 a.m., settles into a small metal desk and does something that, until last year, was completely foreign to him: computer coding.


“A lot of people look at us coal miners as uneducated,” said Ratliff, a 38-year-old with a thin goatee and thick arms. “It’s backbreaking work, but there’s engineers and very sophisticated equipment. You work hard and efficiently and that translates right into coding.”

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7 Lessons About Making Micro Credentials Work in Education Prof. Devt. (EdSurge News)

7 Lessons About Making Micro Credentials Work in Education Prof. Devt. (EdSurge News) | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Description by EdSurge:

"The Friday Institute for Educational Innovation at North Carolina State University has experimented a fair amount with micro-credentials and teacher professional development, asking questions like: Do teachers actually like these things? What’s the best way to demonstrate a competency? The Institute’s Lauren Acree shares answers to these questions and five more from her team’s fruitful micro-credential trials."


Jim Lerman's insight: This brief article summarizes some quite important research.

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Epic Country-Level A/B Test Proves Open Is Better Than Closed :: Alec Ross

Epic Country-Level A/B Test Proves Open Is Better Than Closed - Backchannel - Medium

"Rarely do countries and societies have the opportunity to make a simple, binary choice about whether they are going to be open or closed. But that is exactly what happened after the dissolution of the Soviet Union and the reestablished independence of Estonia and Belarus. The two countries are separated by just a few hundred kilometers west of Russia, but their trajectories could not be more different.


"Estonia is “The Little Country That Could,” the title of a book by the first prime minister of Estonia, Mart Laar, which explained the country’s rise from ruin at the end of Soviet occupation in 1991 to become one of the most innovative societies in the world today."

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Brazil Gives Out Books That Double as Subway Tickets, Promoting Literacy & Mass Transit at Once | Open Culture

Brazil Gives Out Books That Double as Subway Tickets, Promoting Literacy & Mass Transit at Once | Open Culture | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

One of the things I miss about living in a city with a subway system is the myriad thoughtful design elements that go into managing a perpetual flow of tourists and commuters. New York’s subway map presents us with an iconic tangle of interlocking tributaries resembling diagrams of a circulatory system. The NYC system’s ingeniously simple graphic presentation of lettered and numbered trains, encircled in their corresponding colors, can be read by most anyone with a rudimentary grasp on the English alphabet—from a new language learner to a small child. The Washington, DC subway system, though a much more prosaic affair overall, whisks riders through impressively cavernous, catacomb-like stations, with brutalist tile and concrete honeycombs that seem to go on forever. The squiggly lines of its color-coded map likewise promise ease of use and legibility.

 

And then there are the hours of reading time granted by a subway commute, a leisure I’ve relinquished now that I rely on car and bike. So you can imagine my envious delight in learning about Brazil’s Ticket Books, which are exactly what they sound like—books that work as subway tickets, designed with the minimalist care that major transit systems do so well. And what’s more, they’re free: “To celebrate World Book Day last April 23rd,” writes “future-forward online resource” PSFK, “[Brazillian publisher] L&PM gave away 10,000 books for free at subway stations across São Paulo. Each book came with ten free trips.” Riders could then recharge them and use the books again or pass them on to others to encourage more reading, an important public service given that Brazilians only read two books per year on average.

 

Click headline to read more, access hot links and watch video clip--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc, Luciana Viter, Jim Lerman
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Sara Rosett's curator insight, February 5, 9:49 AM

Sara's thoughts: Love this idea! #Multi-tasking. It's a book and a ticket! 

#tw

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High school student develops 3D printed ring to monitor Parkinson's disease symptoms

High school student develops 3D printed ring to monitor Parkinson's disease symptoms | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
In 1996, world famous boxer Muhammad Ali was chosen to light the Olympic torch at the Atlanta Olympic games despite his suffering of Parkinsons disease. The moment was a historic one and to one young boy, who viewed the ceremony on Youtube years after it occurred, it was the ultimate inspiration. Utkarsh Tandon, the young boy who drew inspiration from Muhammad Ali, is now a high school student at Cupertino High School in California who has developed a 3D printed ring that is capable of monitoring Parkinson’s patients’ tremors and translating them into data accessible through an iOS app.
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MIT Dean Takes Leave to Start New University Without Lectures or Classrooms :: Jeffrey R. Young

MIT Dean Takes Leave to Start New University Without Lectures or Classrooms  :: Jeffrey R. Young | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Christine Ortiz is taking a leave from her prestigious post as a professor and dean at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to start a radical, new nonprofit university that she says will have no majors, no lectures, and no classrooms.


"Many details about the new university are still undetermined, she says, but the basic idea is to answer the question, What if you could start a university from scratch for today’s needs and with today’s technology?


"The plan is to begin with a campus in the Boston area that she hopes will grow to about 10,000 students and 1,000 faculty members — about the size of MIT. And her long-term plan is to add more campuses in other cities as well."

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, February 2, 8:40 PM

Thanks to Jim Lerman. 

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Little Separates Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton in Tight Race in Iowa :: NY Times :: Patrick Healy

Little Separates Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton in Tight Race in Iowa :: NY Times :: Patrick Healy | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Hillary Clinton and Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont were locked in an intensely tight race in the Iowa caucuses on Monday as Mrs. Clinton’s strong support among women and older voters was matched by the passionate liberal foot soldiers whom Mr. Sanders has been calling to political revolution.


"The close results were deeply unnerving to Mrs. Clinton and her husband, former President Bill Clinton, as well as her advisers, some of whom had expressed growing confidence in recent days that they had recaptured political momentum after weeks when Mr. Sanders was drawing huge crowds and rising in the polls. The Clintons had appeared optimistic at rallies over the weekend, thanking Iowans for their support as much as urging them to turn out to vote.

"The close vote means that Mrs. Clinton and Mr. Sanders are likely to split Iowa’s share of delegates to the Democratic convention, and Mr. Sanders will be able to argue that the Iowa result was a virtual tie.

"The Clinton team was counting on its huge, well-trained army of volunteers, covering all of Iowa’s 1,681 voting precincts, to counter the enormous enthusiasm of voters who jammed into events to hear Mr. Sanders. But his well-financed Iowa organization was able to convert the energy of his crowds into voters on Monday night, as he drew huge numbers of first-time caucusgoers, young people and liberals who responded to his rallying cry against the nation’s “rigged economy.”

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The one percent discovers transhumanism: Davos 2016 :: Rick Searle

The one percent discovers transhumanism: Davos 2016 :: Rick Searle | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
The theme of this year’s WEF was what Klaus Schwab calls The Fourth Industrial Revolution a period of deeply transformative change, which Schwab believes we are merely at the beginning of. The three revolutions which preceded the current one were the first industrial revolution which occurred between 1760 and 1840 and brought us the stream engine and railroads. The second industrial revolution in the late 19th and early 20th centuries brought us mass production and electricity. The third computer or digital revolution brought us mail.frames, personal computers, the Internet and mobile technologies and began in the 1960s.

The fourth revolution whose beginning all of us are lucky enough to see includes artificial intelligence and machine learning, the “Internet of things” and it’s ubiquitous sensors, along with big data. In addition to these technologies that grow directly out of Moore’s Law, the Fourth Industrial Revolution includes rapid advances in the biological sciences that portend everything from enormous  gains in human longevity to “designer babies”. Here too we find our rapidly increasing knowledge of the human brain, the new neuroscience, that will likely upend not only our treatment of mental and neurodegenerative diseases such as alzheimer’s but include areas from criminal justice to advertising


Jim Lerman's insight: 

I just recently discovered Searle's blog and very much appreciate his perspectives.

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Tech Innovation & Economic Inequality :: Andrew Rasmussen

Tech Innovation & Economic Inequality :: Andrew Rasmussen | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Jobs are soon going to be automated away faster than we can create them.


"A prime example of this is driving jobs. Over 2.8% of jobs in the U.S. are as some kind of driver — e.g. truck, bus, or taxi. While this percentage may not sound like a lot, we’re talking about over 4 million people possibly being displaced in the U.S. alone. [1][2] You know all those Uber drivers who are upset about rate cuts? Just wait until autonomous vehicles take over.

"Autonomous vehicles may seem far off, but they’re just around the corner. Elon estimates that Teslas will be fully autonomous in late 2018 and that legislation will allow them to drive without a human only 1–3 years after that. Driving on the freeway is the easiest thing to automate and truck drivers happen to make up for 77.6% of those 4 million driving jobs. Autonomously driven tractor-trailers (those big trucks on the highway that are driven by 1.8 million people) are already being tested on public highways as of May 2015. [1]"

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New Challenges to Active Learning Initiatives

New Challenges to Active Learning Initiatives | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Key Takeaways

Year two of Case Western Reserve University's Active Learning Fellowshipprogram supported the first year's evidence of success in using active learning techniques in active learning classrooms.Unexpectedly, active learning techniques applied in large classes in regular classrooms proved unpopular with students, as expressed in surveys and focus groups at the end of the semester.The challenges teased out of the data indicated additional factors influencing active learning success and guided modifications to year three of the Active Learning Fellowship faculty selection process.


Via Kim Flintoff
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Flipped Student Feedback…It’s Hard Out Here for a Teacher :: Lori Uemura

Flipped Student Feedback…It’s Hard Out Here for a Teacher :: Lori Uemura | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Well, I asked for it. But I should have put on a bullet proof vest before reading all of the feedback, anonymous feedback, from my MS students about flipped classroom. Their comments were not all negative; not even a majority was, but the negative comments hurt like it must feel to be shot wearing Kevlar. I guess that since MY experience with flipped, though hard work, has been so very positive, I never expected any strong negative replies to the student survey. In fact, I was so sensitive to them that I had to read through all of the responses 3 times before I could see the forest of positive for the negative trees. Thankfully, there were a lot of positive comments too.
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Futuresource EdTech at BETT 2016

Futuresource EdTech at BETT 2016 | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

BETT is the U.K.'s biggest Ed Tech show, comparable to ISTE in the U.S. Click on the title or graphic above to go to a succinct summary of "Key Themes from the Show" and a link to Futuresource's full report. -JL


"After another exciting BETT show 2016 saw some new activity and developments from the key players as well as new comers to the market. Futuresource sent a team of 11 to the show and below we have summarised some of our thoughts on the key themes from the show. A link to our full report, available for free download is provided at the bottom."

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What will school look like in 2050? Teachers from six countries respond.

Welcome to the "Choose Your Own Adventure" Future of Learning - Bright - Medium
What will school look like in 2050? Teachers from six countries respond.

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