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Unorthodox math lessons add up to real gains at Dana Middle School in Hawthorne | dailybreeze.com

Unorthodox math lessons add up to real gains at Dana Middle School in Hawthorne | dailybreeze.com | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Rob Kunzia

 

"Much of what you thought you knew about math class has been turned on its head at Dana Middle School in the Wiseburn School District.

 

"Seventh- and eighth-graders at the west Hawthorne school don't really use textbooks or do much in the way of homework. The teachers rarely spend more than 10 minutes on any given lecture. At the beginning of class, instead of urging kids to quiet down, the teachers try to get them riled up.

 

"If it all seems a little strange, the method of teaching - developed by researchers at Loyola Marymount University - also might offer a glimpse into what math instruction will look like in the future. At Dana, it has produced striking results.

 

"In two years, the share of eighth-graders scoring proficient or better in algebra at the school has more than doubled, from 27 percent to 62 percent. Also, a strong majority of students at the school - 62 percent - now cite math as their favorite subject."

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:: The 4th Era ::
Exploration of the new era in human history marked by invention of the Internet
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Introducing this work

Introducing this work | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

For the purposes of this Scoop.it site, the history of human interaction with information may be divided into 4 eras. The first (spoken) era ended with the invention of writing around 3000-4000 BC. The second era ended with the invention of the printing press in 1440. The third era ended, and the fourth began, with the invention of the Internet (depending how one defines its operational beginning) somewhere between 1969 and 1982. We now exist early, but decidedly, in the fourth era.

 

All readers may not agree with this interpretation of the history of information, especially with the division and numbering of the eras. That is not the main point. Rather, it is that humankind is presently existing in an era distinctly different from the one that preceded it -- that in fact, this new era is accompanied with, and characterized by, a new - and quite different - information landscape. This new Internet information landscape will challenge, disrupt, and overpower the print-oriented one that came before it. It will not completely obliterate that which preceded it, but it will render it to a subsidiary, rather than primary, level of influence.

 

Just as the printing press altered humanity's relationship with information, thereby resulting in massive restructuring of political, religious, economic, social, educational, cultural, scientific, and other realms of life; so too will the advance of digital technology occasion analogous transformations in the corresponding universe of present and future human activity.

 

This site will concern itself primarily with how K-20 education in the US, and the people who comprise its constituencies, may be affected by this transformative movement from one era to the next. All ideas considered here appear, to me at least, to impact the learning enterprise in some way. Accordingly, this work looks at the present and the future through a lens that is predominantly, but far from entirely, a digital one. -JL

 

Opinions expressed, scooped, or copied in this Scoop.it topic are my own, or a result of my own judgment, and should in no way be understood to reflect those of my employer.

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Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:43 AM
Jim - I like your perspective. Great subject matter here!
Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:46 AM
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Azania Nduli-AmaZulu UbuntuPsychology.ORG's curator insight, July 8, 2013 6:24 PM

Beautiful!

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Automating Education and Teaching Machines - Talk by Audrey Watters, March 30, 2017

Automating Education and Teaching Machines - Talk by Audrey Watters, March 30, 2017 | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Automating Education and Teaching Machines

Audrey Watters, Hack Education 

12 noon - 2pm, Thursday 30 March 2017

Godfrey Thomson Hall, Holyrood campus. The talk will also be livestreamed - web address for this to follow.

all are welcome - sign up here if you want to attend in person. Please bring your lunch.

"Can computers replace teachers?" The Atlantic recently asked. "Can AI replace student testing?" another publication queried. These sorts of headlines are appearing with increasing frequency. But do they reflect technological advances in "artificial intelligence"? Or are they reflections instead of culture and political desires to see education automated?

This talk will explore the history of "teaching machines" -- a history that certainly pre-dates the latest hype about artificial intelligence. It will also examine the ideological (and technical) underpinnings of Silicon Valley's recent push to automate -- or as it calls it, "personalize" -- education."

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

This promises to be quite an event. Watters usually takes no prisoners.

 

It's being live streamed from Scotland. Google tells me 12 noon in Scotland is 8 am EDT.

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3 Ways Exponential Technologies are Impacting the Future of Learning

3 Ways Exponential Technologies are Impacting the Future of Learning | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Exponential technologies have a tendency to move from a deceptively slow pace of development to a disruptively fast pace. We often disregard or don’t notice technologies in the deceptive growth phase, until they begin changing the way we live and do business.

 

Driven by information technologies, products and services become digitized, dematerialized, demonetized and/or democratized and enter a phase of exponential growth.

 

Nicole Wilson, who was Singularity University’s vice president of faculty and curriculum until last year, believes education technology is currently in a phase of deceptive growth, and we are seeing the beginning of how exponential technologies are impacting 1) what we need to learn, 2) how we view schooling and society and 3) how we will teach and learn in the future.

 

[Gust MEES] Simply put, as WE (#Schools) DON'T know WHAT THAT world would be, WE SHOULD prepare the #students #LEARNers for <===> #LEARNing2LEARN to become #LifeLongLEARNing persons! Please check my #blog post <===> https://gustmees.wordpress.com/.../teaching-was.../

 

<===> #ModernEDU #Coaching

 


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Magaly Siméon's curator insight, March 20, 3:15 AM

Very interesting subject to be considered and discussed. I will disclose the post to my contacts and subscribers in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com

Jessica Henao's curator insight, March 21, 9:52 AM
The 21st century skills and the common 4Cs have been changing and into a new set of  characteristics... .It’s clear that technologies undergoing exponential growth are shaping the skills we need to be successful, how we approach education in the classroom, and what tools we will use in the future to teach and learn.
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, Today, 2:36 AM
3 Ways Exponential Technologies are Impacting the Future of Learning
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From virtual reality to online libraries, how technology is revolutionizing education in Grand Rapids

From virtual reality to online libraries, how technology is revolutionizing education in Grand Rapids | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"From virtual online classrooms built by such companies as Microsoft and Switch to the massive open online courses from providers like edX, Coursera and Udemy, and even distance learning programs facilitated by our own brick-and-mortar universities, the walls of modern classrooms are often anything but metaphor. While the blackboard may remain the same--although it comes in white and clear versions now, too--the substance of technology education has been significantly redesigned by the capabilities of the technology being used to educate.

"Some classrooms have integrated iPads, Chromebooks, and even makerspaces (essentially community spaces with tools) for years now, while others are just beginning to take advantage of such innovations. With updated equipment, new software and access to a library of online resources, the Grand Rapids Public Schools district is looking forward to added gains in learning this year. Explorative spaces installed at Grand Valley State University will help older students test and build the devices that tomorrow's learning environments may rely on.

"[Grand Rapids Public Schools] is currently responsible for some of the most innovative learning centers in the country. Under the superintendency of Teresa Weatherall Neal, the school district has grown up and out. The district's Innovation Central High School is anchored by its four distinct academies of modern engineering, health sciences and technology, design and construction, and business leadership and entrepreneurship, each an example of innovative technologies and techniques."

 

via Technology & Learning magazine

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

A well-reported article detailing numerous efforts underway in Grand Rapids, Michigan to integrate technology seamlessly into the local educational ecosystem and culture. If you're looking for a model where things seem as though they're being done with foresight and community spirit, this is a good place to start.

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Peter Guralnick on Why Chuck Berry Is Even Greater Than You Think :: Rolling Stone

Peter Guralnick on Why Chuck Berry Is Even Greater Than You Think :: Rolling Stone | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"...there is no end to my admiration for Chuck Berry's work, even if his commitment to performance has at times proved wanting. As much as Percy Mayfield remains the Poet Laureate of the Blues, Chuck Berry will always be the Poet Laureate of – what? Of Our Time. Has there ever been a more perfect pop song than "Nadine," a catchier encapsulation of story line and wit in four verses and a chorus, in which the protagonist (like all of Chuck's characters, a not-too-distant stand-in for its author but never precisely himself) is introduced "pushing through the crowd trying to get to where she's at/I was campaign shouting like a Southern diplomat." I mean, come on – and the song only gets better from there. When he was recognized in 2012 by PEN New England (a division of the international writers' organization) for its first "Song Lyrics of Literary Excellence" award, his co-honoree, Leonard Cohen, graciously declared that "all of us are footnotes to the words of Chuck Berry," while Bob Dylan called him "the Shakespeare of rock & roll."

"Which is all very generically well. But perhaps the most persuasive tribute I ever encountered was delivered by the highly cerebral New Orleans singer, songwriter, arranger and pianist extraordinaire, Allen Toussaint. I was trying to get at some of the reasons for the dramatic expansion of his own songwriting aspirations (musically, poetically, politically) in the Seventies, when he graduated from brilliant pop cameos like "Ride Your Pony" and "Mother in Law" to more ambitious, post-Beatles, post-Miles, post–Civil Rights Era work. Was it the influence of Bob Dylan, say, that allowed him to contemplate a wider range of subjects, a greater length of songs? Oh, not at all, Allen replied in his cool, elegant manner; he wished he could agree with me, but his single greatest influence in terms of lyrics and storytelling from first to last was Chuck Berry. And with that he started quoting Chuck Berry lyrics, just as you or I might, just as Elvis Presley, Carl Perkins, and Jerry Lee Lewis do on the fabled "Million Dollar Quartet" session. "What a wonderful little story that is," he said of "You Never Can Tell," Chuck's fairy-tale picture of young love in Creole-speaking Louisiana, "how he lived that life with that couple, you know. Oh, the man's a mountain," said Allen unhesitatingly, and then went on to quote some more."

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Transgender student: I am mad, I am upset, and I am invalidated

Transgender student: I am mad, I am upset, and I am invalidated | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"It hurt to have a federal bathroom guideline that protected transgender students taken away from the LGBT community. The Obama administration guideline stated that public schools had to let transgender students use the bathroom of the gender they identified as, or lose federal funding. This was a big step for the transgender community to be recognized like that on a federal level, and it was important for the students who didn't feel protected or safe.


"I know exactly what it feels like to not be protected in school. When I first tried to come out as transgender, I was in eighth grade. I thought I was ready at that time, so I decided to talk to my vice principal to let him know that I was transgender and that I was ready to go by a different name. I wanted to know what his plan would be to make me feel comfortable, safe and welcome."

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Typography Inspiration for the Modern Web · Typewolf

Typography Inspiration for the Modern Web · Typewolf | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Description by The Scout Report

 

"Typography enthusiasts, including professional graphic designers and those of us with a general fondness for font design, will enjoy TypeWolf, a website about "what's trending in type." Authored by professional designer Jeremiah Shoaf (whose clients include the Discovery Channel, Animal Planet, and The Washington Post to name just a few), TypeWolf features a number of interesting resources and articles. Anyone currently engaged in design projects, such as creating a website, flyer, or infographic, may want to start by checking out Font Recommendations & Lists. Here, visitors can explore Shoaf's top ten fonts that are underused, check out possible alternatives for the ubiquitous Helvetica, and learn where to find free fonts. Meanwhile, Web Fonts in the Wild features a new website (and font) each day, allowing designers to visualize how fonts shape the aesthetic character of different websites. Those interested in reading Shoaf's musings about new developments in the world of typography can do so via his Blog. Finally, the Guides & Resources section offers links to a variety of outside resources including online books, blogs, and more."

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The Glossary of Education Reform -

The Glossary of Education Reform - | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Description by The Scout Report

 

"What is a norm-referenced test? What does it mean for a student to be "college-ready"? What does project-based learning entail? Designed for "journalists, parents, and community members," the Glossary of Education Reform is intended to make jargon and terminology used in educational policy circles accessible to anyone. While vocabulary related to educational reform is often linked to particular policy implementations and ideologies, the team behind the Glossary of Education Reform strives to be as objective as possible. The Glossary was created by the Great Schools Partnership, a Portland, Maine based non-profit organization that works "to redesign public education and improve learning for all students." This resource is authored and edited by a team of educational policy analysts, journalists, and scholars. Users can search for terms or browse terms alphabetically."

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Trump's Education Budget Revealed

Trump's Education Budget Revealed | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
All together, the budget has many moving parts, but its message is straightforward: Under the Trump administration, federal aid is out and school choice is in. Whether this stays the case moving forward is unclear. As a recent analysis from the Washington, D.C.-based New America Foundation puts it, “This budget request is nothing more than that—a request to Congress, unlikely to be heeded and subject to the tinkering and votes of hundreds of members of Congress.” Still, its authors argue, “it’s an indication of the priorities of the Trump Administration.”
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10 Trends That Are Reshaping EdTech

10 Trends That Are Reshaping EdTech | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Trend usually implies that something is short term, like a one-hit wonder on the radio, but when we talk about educational technology, these trends are here to not only stay, but grow. While it is hard to choose the most important educational technology trends, we did our best to craft this list of ten.
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How the Internet Is Saving Culture, Not Killing It :: NY Times

How the Internet Is Saving Culture, Not Killing It :: NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"The internet taught a whole generation that content was not something you really had to pay for. So for years, digital content companies — especially those in the online news business — looked doomed to pursue a scale-only, ad-based business model. They tried to reach tens of millions of readers, viewers or listeners in the hopes of getting pennies in ads per user. Not only was that unsustainable, it was also ruining culture: It left no room for small acts and subtle niches, and it turned everything into overheated clickbait. Things looked gloomy.

"But now something surprising has happened.

"In the last few years, and with greater intensity in the last 12 months, people started paying for online content. They are doing so at an accelerating pace, and on a dependable, recurring schedule, often through subscriptions. And they’re paying for everything.

"You’ve already heard about the rise of subscription-based media platforms — things like Amazon Prime, Netflix, Hulu, HBO, Spotify and Apple Music. But people are also paying for smaller-audience and less-mainstream-friendly content. They are subscribing to podcasters, comedians, zany YouTube stars, novelists and comic book artists. They are even paying for news.

"It’s difficult to overstate how big a deal this is. More than 20 years after it first caught mainstream attention and began to destroy everything about how we finance culture, the digital economy is finally beginning to coalesce around a sustainable way of supporting content. If subscriptions keep taking off, it won’t just mean that some of your favorite creators will survive the internet. It could also make for a profound shift in the way we find and support new cultural talent. It could lead to a wider variety of artists and art, and forge closer connections between the people who make art and those who enjoy it."

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I made my classroom look like the real-world…and test scores soared

I made my classroom look like the real-world…and test scores soared | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Think about the jobs in today's economy - the ones we're supposed to prepare students for after graduation. Are employees evaluated using bubble-in tests to prove they know the ins and outs of their job? Do they learn and use new skills one at a time in a vacuum? The questions sound a bit silly until you do too often that's what students take away from their education. Why is the culture to drill facts into students' heads just to pass a test?


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21st Century Skills Have Always Been “Needed” Skills, But Now We Need Them More Than Ever

21st Century Skills Have Always Been “Needed” Skills, But Now We Need Them More Than Ever | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
It's 2017. Communication is changing fast (my 7-yr old daughter and I just exchanged Snaps while I am in Chicago and she is outside of Philadelphia in different time zones, with real-time interaction). Collaboration has evolved to

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Marta Torán's curator insight, February 6, 4:15 PM

A.J. Juliani reflexiona sobre la importancia de las habilidades "blandas" para aprender y enseñar en el siglo XXI.

 

Nos cuenta las 5 categorías que considera Seth Godin:

 

Autocontrol - Productividad - Sabiduría - Percepción - Influencia

Dr. Theresa Kauffman's curator insight, February 9, 12:08 PM
These skills are important and essential for success in the 21st Century. Schools must pay attention to the whole student to prepare them for their future.
Margarita Saucedo's curator insight, March 17, 10:26 PM
Encontrando la "mezcla" entre habilidades y actitudes
#Habilidades #Las4Cs
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A Glimpse Inside the Coffers: Endowment Spending at Wealthy Colleges and Universities - The Education Trust

A Glimpse Inside the Coffers: Endowment Spending at Wealthy Colleges and Universities - The Education Trust | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Amid intense national conversations on income inequality, A Glimpse Inside the Coffers finds that extreme wealth stratification is occurring not only among individuals, but also among institutions of higher education. This report reveals that in 2013, roughly 3.6 percent of colleges and universities — 138 in all — held 75 percent of all postsecondary endowment wealth. Yet despite their vast wealth, too few of these colleges invest enough in students from low-income families.

Dubbed by Ed Trust as the “$500 million club,” these 138 institutions each held at least half-a-billion dollars in endowment assets in 2013. And these colleges benefit tremendously from their endowments since there is no required spending threshold and these funds are tax-exempt.

But as Ed Trust research reveals, nearly half of institutions in the “$500 million club” are in the bottom 5 percent nationally for their enrollment of first-time, full-time Pell Grant recipients. Moreover, nearly 4 in 5 of these wealthy institutions have an annual net price for low-income students that exceeds 60 percent of their annual family income. These colleges can and should do more to enroll a greater number of low-income students and to make college more affordable.
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Platform Companies Are Becoming More Powerful — but What Exactly Do They Want? :: NY Times

Platform Companies Are Becoming More Powerful — but What Exactly Do They Want? :: NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Platforms are, in a sense, capitalism distilled to its essence. They are proudly experimental and maximally consequential, prone to creating externalities and especially disinclined to address or even acknowledge what happens beyond their rising walls. And accordingly, platforms are the underlying trend that ties together popular narratives about technology and the economy in general. Platforms provide the substructure for the “gig economy” and the “sharing economy”; they’re the economic engine of social media; they’re the architecture of the “attention economy” and the inspiration for claims about the “end of ownership.”

But the tensions that platforms like Uber create with their customers, their workers and the world that surrounds them will soon become harder to ignore as these companies foment economic and social change, the consequences of which will increasingly be thrust into spectacular display.
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Flying cars to be tested by end of 2017, says Airbus

Flying cars to be tested by end of 2017, says Airbus | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
One of the world's biggest aerospace companies plans to test a prototype of a flying car by the end of this year, a move that could be a big step towards easing congestion on urban roads.
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Chuck Berry, Rock ’n’ Roll Pioneer, Dies at 90 :: NY Times

Chuck Berry, Rock ’n’ Roll Pioneer, Dies at 90 :: NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Chuck Berry, who with his indelible guitar licks, brash self-confidence and memorable songs about cars, girls and wild dance parties did as much as anyone to define rock ’n’ roll’s potential and attitude in its early years, died on Saturday at his home near Wentzville, Mo. He was 90.

"While Elvis Presley was rock’s first pop star and teenage heartthrob, Mr. Berry was its master theorist and conceptual genius, the songwriter who understood what the kids wanted before they knew themselves. With songs like “Johnny B. Goode” and “Roll Over Beethoven,” he gave his listeners more than they knew they were getting from jukebox entertainment.

"His guitar lines wired the lean twang of country and the bite of the blues into phrases with both a streamlined trajectory and a long memory. And tucked into the lighthearted, telegraphic narratives that he sang with such clear enunciation was a sly defiance, upending convention to claim the pleasures of the moment."

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Chuck Berry, Fiery and Flinty Rock ’n’ Roll Innovator :: NY Times

Chuck Berry, Fiery and Flinty Rock ’n’ Roll Innovator :: NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Mr. Berry, who died on Saturday at his home near St. Louis, was the first true rock ’n’ roll superstar. When in his late 20s he emerged from St. Louis onto the national scene, the genre wasn’t yet codified. In its infancy, rock was hybrid music, and Mr. Berry was its most vivid and imaginative alchemist.

From the mid-1950s through the end of that decade, he concocted a yowling blend of hopped-up blues, country and then-emergent rhythm & blues that ended up as the template for what became widely accepted as rock ’n’ roll (though the term predated his rise).

He gave it virtuoso playing via guitar work that drew on country and the blues. He made it a songwriting genre with wry, detailed lyrics that helped shape the idea of American freedom via stories of teenage abandon or open-road adventure. He embodied the music by giving it physical language, from his signature duck walk to his coiffure, which was equal parts structure and flair. (He also was a beautician, having studied hairdressing and cosmetology when he was still playing in small bands in St. Louis in the early 1950s.) And in performance, he sold the music hard, with eyes bulging, hips swaying and a sly smile that indicated he knew just how much he was pushing the envelope.
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Literary Hub

Literary  Hub | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Lit Hub is a central place for writers, publishers, books, bookstores, librarians, and readers to congregate and celebrate books and literary culture."

 

Description by The Scout Report

 

"Literary Hub is an online magazine that strives to be "a single, trusted, daily source for all the news, ideas and richness of contemporary literary life." To do so, Literary Hub partners with a wide variety of sources for literary news and reviews, including publishers, bookstores, and literary journals. Readers will find book reviews, author profiles, interviews, essays, book excerpts, and more. Those looking for a new read may want to start with Bookmarks, a feature that helpfully compiles critical reviews of new books from major publications. Readers can then see how these reviewers assessed the book (reviews are categorized as Rave, Positive, Mixed or Pan) and read these reviews in full. Meanwhile, readers can explore a number of original pieces in Features. As of this write up, recent pieces in Features include an essay by novelist and short story writer Jhumpa Lahiri and a profile of author Jami Attenberg. Those who want to stay informed about literary news may want to sign up for Lit Hub Daily, a regular round-up of literary news from Literary Hub and other publications and organizations."

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Amid ‘Trump Effect’ Fear, 40% of Colleges See Dip in Foreign Applicants :: NY Times

Amid ‘Trump Effect’ Fear, 40% of Colleges See Dip in Foreign Applicants :: NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Nearly 40 percent of colleges are reporting overall declines in applications from international students, according to a survey of 250 college and universities, released this week by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers. The biggest decline is in applications from the Middle East.

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Dave Parker on Code Schools

Dave Parker on Code Schools | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Code schools, while having an early impact, have two significant challenges. The early impact can be tracked in two categories: reporting (placement rates and starting salaries) and challenges (accessibility and sustainability).

Reporting, or I should call it industry self-reporting, needs to start before federal regulators request it. We’ve been working with an industry group to lead how the top programs report on industry placement rates.

Placement rates are easy when schools start; you can help nearly all of your students get jobs. Over time, as that number grows, the law of large numbers will impact percentages. Also, programs like these aren’t for everyone. Even with a freshly minted set of technical skills, people who are socially awkward will still have significant challenges getting a job. The work of getting a job is still work. Also, middle-aged white guys, a category I am part of, still find it difficult to find work in a market that favors youth.

Starting salary is also a measure of program outcomes. No employer wants to hire junior talent. But access to talent is a huge challenge which means they do hire junior talent anyway. In hot hiring markets this continues to be true. It will be interesting to see the outcomes over time and in smaller markets that may favor startups versus large company hiring.

As for accessibility and sustainability, the industry has a challenge in that it’s still expensive and people who would want to pursue careers in tech are limited, given current funding mechanics. This is especially true for women, underserved minorities and veterans.
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Are Teenagers Replacing Drugs With Smartphones? :: NY Times

Are Teenagers Replacing Drugs With Smartphones? :: NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Amid an opioid epidemic, the rise of deadly synthetic drugs and the widening legalization of marijuana, a curious bright spot has emerged in the youth drug culture: American teenagers are growing less likely to try or regularly use drugs, including alcohol.

"With minor fits and starts, the trend has been building for a decade, with no clear understanding as to why. Some experts theorize that falling cigarette-smoking rates are cutting into a key gateway to drugs, or that antidrug education campaigns, long a largely failed enterprise, have finally taken hold.

"But researchers are starting to ponder an intriguing question: Are teenagers using drugs less in part because they are constantly stimulated and entertained by their computers and phones?

"The possibility is worth exploring, they say, because use of smartphones and tablets has exploded over the same period that drug use has declined. This correlation does not mean that one phenomenon is causing the other, but scientists say interactive media appears to play to similar impulses as drug experimentation, including sensation-seeking and the desire for independence."

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We can teach women to code, but that just creates another problem

We can teach women to code, but that just creates another problem | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
It’s not always obvious to outsiders, but the term “technology sector” is a catch-all for a large array of distinct jobs. Of course there are PR, HR and management roles. But even if we confine ourselves to web development, technical people often distinguish among front-end, back-end and full-stack development. The partition between the two “ends” is the web itself. Front-end developers are the people who design and implement what you see in your web browser. Back-end developers are the people who do the programming that works behind the scenes. And full-stack developers are the people who do it all.

But here’s the problem: the technology industry enforces a distinct gender hierarchy between front-end and back-end development. Women are typecast as front-end developers, while men work on the back end – where they generally earn significantly more money than their front-end counterparts. That’s not to say that women only work on the front end, or that men only work on the back end – far from it. But developers tell me that the stereotype is real.
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Instructional design: from “packaging” to “scaffolding”

Instructional design: from “packaging” to “scaffolding” | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

In my recent posts, The changing role of L & D: from "packaging" to "scaffolding" plus "social capability building" and Towards the Connected L & D Department I wrote about the need to move fro ...


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Marta Torán's curator insight, March 6, 2013 2:48 PM

La diferencia en diseño instruccional entre "empaquetar" un curso y practicar el "andamiaje", es decir, proporcionar una estructura o marco para que los estudiantes construyan su conocimiento. 

 

Un artículo de Jane Hart con información, cuadros comparativos y criterio...

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For-Profit Colleges Gain Beachhead in Trump Administration

For-Profit Colleges Gain Beachhead in Trump Administration | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Until June 2016, Taylor Hansen lobbied for the largest trade group of for-profit colleges. At the forefront of its agenda: eliminating a rule known as “gainful employment,” which can take away federal funding from for-profit colleges if their graduates fail to earn enough to repay student loans.

Last week, that goal started to become a reality. The U.S. Department of Education delayed the deadline for colleges to comply with certain provisions of gainful employment, saying it plans to review the rule.

By then, Hansen was watching from the inside, benefiting from the Trump administration’s ethics policies that allow former lobbyists to work for agencies they have recently tried to influence. He told ProPublica that, about a month ago, the Trump administration hired him to join the Education Department’s “beachhead” team. It’s a group of temporary employees, often with political connections, who do not require U.S. Senate approval for their appointments.
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