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What America Manufactures

What America Manufactures | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"It's a myth that the U.S. doesn't make anything anymore."  The U.S. economy still produces more through manufacturing tangible goods ($1.5 trillion) than it does in providing services ($600 billion) for the international market.  The maps and graphs in this article are great teaching materials.  The impact of NAFTA is shown powerfully in the regionalization of U.S. trade partners, making this salient material for a discussion on supranationalism as well.   


Via Seth Dixon, Karen Kelly
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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 11, 2013 7:09 PM


This is great because now we can witness the creation of jobs in the country which can help the country get out of the depression that it is in. it also can help people get jobs and not have to worry about if there unemployment check is going enough to cover there expenses. Also people that are working are less likely to get depressed because they are not trapped in there homes because now they have something that is distracting them. But the United States is seeing a great improvement because of all the things being manufactured here. One good example is the Honda accord power plant and the ford motor company plant and even general motors in Detroit. all of these companies is helping the Americans get back into the workforce.

Nicholas Patrie's curator insight, September 10, 2014 3:05 PM

i was surprised to see that our country still exports so many products. What i find even more surprising is that the top countries that are buying our good are our bordering countries, Canada and Mexico. As much Petroleum we receive from the middle east we still are exporting so much of it to Canada and Mexico. It seems that foreign cars such as ones from Japan are taking over the industry yet our top export to Canada is car parts. it is good to see that America still exports.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 12:03 PM

I was surprised and reassured to see how much the U.S. exports to other parts of the world.  I was unaware that the U.S exported to China because we physically surrounded by items made in China. Although our imports exceed exports, we are still producing,

 

:: The 4th Era ::
Exploration of the new era in human history marked by invention of the Internet
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Introducing this work

Introducing this work | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

For the purposes of this Scoop.it site, the history of human interaction with information may be divided into 4 eras. The first (spoken) era ended with the invention of writing around 3000-4000 BC. The second era ended with the invention of the printing press in 1440. The third era ended, and the fourth began, with the invention of the Internet (depending how one defines its operational beginning) somewhere between 1969 and 1982. We now exist early, but decidedly, in the fourth era.

 

All readers may not agree with this interpretation of the history of information, especially with the division and numbering of the eras. That is not the main point. Rather, it is that humankind is presently existing in an era distinctly different from the one that preceded it -- that in fact, this new era is accompanied with, and characterized by, a new - and quite different - information landscape. This new Internet information landscape will challenge, disrupt, and overpower the print-oriented one that came before it. It will not completely obliterate that which preceded it, but it will render it to a subsidiary, rather than primary, level of influence.

 

Just as the printing press altered humanity's relationship with information, thereby resulting in massive restructuring of political, religious, economic, social, educational, cultural, scientific, and other realms of life; so too will the advance of digital technology occasion analogous transformations in the corresponding universe of present and future human activity.

 

This site will concern itself primarily with how K-20 education in the US, and the people who comprise its constituencies, may be affected by this transformative movement from one era to the next. All ideas considered here appear, to me at least, to impact the learning enterprise in some way. Accordingly, this work looks at the present and the future through a lens that is predominantly, but far from entirely, a digital one. -JL

 

Opinions expressed, scooped, or copied in this Scoop.it topic are my own, or a result of my own judgment, and should in no way be understood to reflect those of my employer.

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Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:43 AM
Jim - I like your perspective. Great subject matter here!
Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:46 AM
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Azania Nduli-AmaZulu UbuntuPsychology.ORG's curator insight, July 8, 2013 6:24 PM

Beautiful!

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8 Ways Body Language Beats IQ

8 Ways Body Language Beats IQ | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"When it comes to success, it's easy to think that people blessed with brains are inevitably going to leave the rest of us in the dust, but social psychologist Amy Cuddy knows first-hand how attitude can outweigh IQ.

"Cuddy suffered a car accident at the age of 19 which resulted in brain damage that took 30 points from her IQ. Before the crash Cuddy had an IQ near genius levels; her post-crash IQ was just average.

"As someone who had always built her identity around her intelligence, the significant dip in Cuddy's IQ left her feeling powerless and unconfident. Despite her brain damage, she slowly made her way through college and even got accepted into the graduate program at Princeton.

"Once at Princeton, Cuddy struggled until she discovered that it was her lack of confidence that was holding her back, not her lack of brainpower. This was especially true during difficult conversations, presentations, and other high-pressure, highly important moments."


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Bryan Worn's curator insight, March 21, 5:33 PM

If you have not watched (and even if you have) Amy Cuddy's TED Talk read this very useful article from her on body language.

Janet Howcroft's curator insight, March 26, 8:48 AM

Wow this is a great read!

 - March 19
donhornsby's curator insight, March 26, 10:38 AM
We often think of body language as the result of our attitude or how we feel. This is true, but psychologists have also shown that the reverse is true: changing your body language changes your attitude.
 
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The neuroscience of asking insightful questions

The neuroscience of asking insightful questions | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
I teach coaching skills to leaders. When I get to the section on how to ask questions (an important part of learning to coach) I might ask a trick question to start off: “How many of you are good at solving problems?”. Without fail, almost all hands shoot enthusiastically into the air. There’s nothing wrong …

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Chris Carter's curator insight, March 23, 8:12 PM
We are not guiding if we are solving for the kids. We need to guide kids to their own solutions to the challenges that they face. Asking questions rather than giving answers tests our patience and our desire to "help," but we do not help if we simply give answers. 
Marshall Alston's curator insight, March 27, 1:35 PM
Depending on what you are trying to learn will depend on how you ask a question.
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Connecting talent with opportunity in the digital age | McKinsey & Company

"Online talent platforms are increasingly connecting people to the right work opportunities. By 2025 they could add $2.7 trillion to global GDP, and begin to ameliorate many of the persistent problems in the world’s labor markets.

"Labor markets around the world haven’t kept pace with rapid shifts in the global economy, and their inefficiencies have taken a heavy toll. Millions of people cannot find work, even as sectors from technology to healthcare struggle to fill open positions. Many who do work feel overqualified or underutilized. These issues translate into costly wasted potential for the global economy. More important, they represent hundreds of millions of people coping with unemployment, underemployment, stagnant wages, and discouragement.

"Online talent platforms can ease a number of labor-market dysfunctions by more effectively connecting individuals with work opportunities. Such platforms include websites, like Monster.com and LinkedIn, that aggregate individual résumés with job postings from traditional employers, as well as the rapidly growing digital marketplaces of the new “gig economy,” such as Uber and Upwork. While hundreds of millions of people around the world already use these services, their capabilities and potential are still evolving. Yet even if they touch only a fraction of the global workforce, we believe they can generate significant benefits for economies and for individuals."

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TED@BCG

TED@BCG | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Seema Bansal is forging a path to public education reform for 15,000 schools in Haryana, India with an ambitious goal: by 2020, 80% of children should have grade-level knowledge. She's looking to meet this goal by seeking reforms that will work in every school without additional resources. Bansal and her team have found success using creative, straightforward techniques—such as they such as communicating with teachers using SMS group chats—and they have already measurably improved learning and engagement in Haryana's schools.

"Seema leads BCG's Social Impact practice in India, and works on disparate projects in fields including education, food security and nutrition, and governance within government agencies."

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How to Help Teachers Get Better Together

How to Help Teachers Get Better Together | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"School districts in the U.S. spend $18 billion on teacher training each year. Most often, in terms of the total hours spent, the format for that training is collaborative professional development, a form of training in which teachers work together in groups to improve their teaching. These groups are often called professional learning communities (PLCs). Two-thirds of U.S. teachers now report spending time in PLCs.

"So far, the results of such collaboration have been poor. The intentions are good, but the implementation is not: teachers are even less satisfied with collaborative professional development than with the “sit and get” workshops that collaboration was intended to replace, according to a survey conducted by The Boston Consulting Group in collaboration with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Many teachers we surveyed found programs poorly structured and the experience boring and disconnected from their day-to-day jobs. Half as many teachers were highly satisfied with their collaborative-professional-development experience (11 percent) as were highly satisfied with workshops (22 percent), traditionally the least interactive form of teacher training.

 

"Districts must begin to close the gap between the engaging, relevant, and hands-on training that teachers and administrators say they want and the reality of disengagement with collaborative training on the ground. The benefits: teachers who have positive collaborative-professional-development experiences say that they work smarter and that their jobs are more sustainable, and they feel that they are better able to address the many challenges they face in implementing Common Core standards, differentiating instruction to meet student needs, and more efficiently using data and technology. They are more engaged, and studies show that a feeling of engagement helps good, difficult-to-replace teachers stay in the profession. Ultimately, the evidence suggests that better implementation of collaborative training could add up to better outcomes for students."

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 23, 4:57 PM
The challenge with "teacher training" is that it is ordered by those furthest from classrooms. Give teachers a voice. What is important to them and their students? Treat them as professionals and it will not be a free-for-all. Treat it like education not training.
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 24, 6:18 AM
How to Help Teachers Get Better Together
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Why Nonprofits Must Innovate

Why Nonprofits Must Innovate | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Much has been written about how innovation drives growth and shareholder value in publicly traded companies. Apple and Google, which again took the top two spots on BCG’s annual list of the world’s most innovative companies, have also been the stock market leaders over the past ten years. But innovation is just as critical for nonprofits—especially as they face growing pressures to serve more people in need and to deliver measurable results.


"...not every nonprofit has the processes, capabilities, and leadership commitment needed to improve its operations and to compete for increasingly scarce philanthropic dollars. To identify the current best practices in the field, BCG conducted more than 25 in-depth interviews with innovation experts from a wide range of organizations in the social sector.

 

"Our research revealed distinct differences between organizations that are innovating successfully and those that are struggling to move forward. We’ve distilled our findings into the following seven guidelines."

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Automating Education and Teaching Machines - Talk by Audrey Watters, March 30, 2017

Automating Education and Teaching Machines - Talk by Audrey Watters, March 30, 2017 | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Automating Education and Teaching Machines

Audrey Watters, Hack Education 

12 noon - 2pm, Thursday 30 March 2017

Godfrey Thomson Hall, Holyrood campus. The talk will also be livestreamed - web address for this to follow.

all are welcome - sign up here if you want to attend in person. Please bring your lunch.

"Can computers replace teachers?" The Atlantic recently asked. "Can AI replace student testing?" another publication queried. These sorts of headlines are appearing with increasing frequency. But do they reflect technological advances in "artificial intelligence"? Or are they reflections instead of culture and political desires to see education automated?

This talk will explore the history of "teaching machines" -- a history that certainly pre-dates the latest hype about artificial intelligence. It will also examine the ideological (and technical) underpinnings of Silicon Valley's recent push to automate -- or as it calls it, "personalize" -- education."

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

This promises to be quite an event. Watters usually takes no prisoners.

 

It's being live streamed from Scotland. Google tells me 12 noon in Scotland is 8 am EDT.

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3 Ways Exponential Technologies are Impacting the Future of Learning

3 Ways Exponential Technologies are Impacting the Future of Learning | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Exponential technologies have a tendency to move from a deceptively slow pace of development to a disruptively fast pace. We often disregard or don’t notice technologies in the deceptive growth phase, until they begin changing the way we live and do business.

 

Driven by information technologies, products and services become digitized, dematerialized, demonetized and/or democratized and enter a phase of exponential growth.

 

Nicole Wilson, who was Singularity University’s vice president of faculty and curriculum until last year, believes education technology is currently in a phase of deceptive growth, and we are seeing the beginning of how exponential technologies are impacting 1) what we need to learn, 2) how we view schooling and society and 3) how we will teach and learn in the future.

 

[Gust MEES] Simply put, as WE (#Schools) DON'T know WHAT THAT world would be, WE SHOULD prepare the #students #LEARNers for <===> #LEARNing2LEARN to become #LifeLongLEARNing persons! Please check my #blog post <===> https://gustmees.wordpress.com/.../teaching-was.../

 

<===> #ModernEDU #Coaching

 


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Magaly Siméon's curator insight, March 20, 3:15 AM

Very interesting subject to be considered and discussed. I will disclose the post to my contacts and subscribers in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com

Jessica Henao's curator insight, March 21, 9:52 AM
The 21st century skills and the common 4Cs have been changing and into a new set of  characteristics... .It’s clear that technologies undergoing exponential growth are shaping the skills we need to be successful, how we approach education in the classroom, and what tools we will use in the future to teach and learn.
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 22, 2:36 AM
3 Ways Exponential Technologies are Impacting the Future of Learning
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From virtual reality to online libraries, how technology is revolutionizing education in Grand Rapids

From virtual reality to online libraries, how technology is revolutionizing education in Grand Rapids | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"From virtual online classrooms built by such companies as Microsoft and Switch to the massive open online courses from providers like edX, Coursera and Udemy, and even distance learning programs facilitated by our own brick-and-mortar universities, the walls of modern classrooms are often anything but metaphor. While the blackboard may remain the same--although it comes in white and clear versions now, too--the substance of technology education has been significantly redesigned by the capabilities of the technology being used to educate.

"Some classrooms have integrated iPads, Chromebooks, and even makerspaces (essentially community spaces with tools) for years now, while others are just beginning to take advantage of such innovations. With updated equipment, new software and access to a library of online resources, the Grand Rapids Public Schools district is looking forward to added gains in learning this year. Explorative spaces installed at Grand Valley State University will help older students test and build the devices that tomorrow's learning environments may rely on.

"[Grand Rapids Public Schools] is currently responsible for some of the most innovative learning centers in the country. Under the superintendency of Teresa Weatherall Neal, the school district has grown up and out. The district's Innovation Central High School is anchored by its four distinct academies of modern engineering, health sciences and technology, design and construction, and business leadership and entrepreneurship, each an example of innovative technologies and techniques."

 

via Technology & Learning magazine

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

A well-reported article detailing numerous efforts underway in Grand Rapids, Michigan to integrate technology seamlessly into the local educational ecosystem and culture. If you're looking for a model where things seem as though they're being done with foresight and community spirit, this is a good place to start.

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Peter Guralnick on Why Chuck Berry Is Even Greater Than You Think :: Rolling Stone

Peter Guralnick on Why Chuck Berry Is Even Greater Than You Think :: Rolling Stone | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"...there is no end to my admiration for Chuck Berry's work, even if his commitment to performance has at times proved wanting. As much as Percy Mayfield remains the Poet Laureate of the Blues, Chuck Berry will always be the Poet Laureate of – what? Of Our Time. Has there ever been a more perfect pop song than "Nadine," a catchier encapsulation of story line and wit in four verses and a chorus, in which the protagonist (like all of Chuck's characters, a not-too-distant stand-in for its author but never precisely himself) is introduced "pushing through the crowd trying to get to where she's at/I was campaign shouting like a Southern diplomat." I mean, come on – and the song only gets better from there. When he was recognized in 2012 by PEN New England (a division of the international writers' organization) for its first "Song Lyrics of Literary Excellence" award, his co-honoree, Leonard Cohen, graciously declared that "all of us are footnotes to the words of Chuck Berry," while Bob Dylan called him "the Shakespeare of rock & roll."

"Which is all very generically well. But perhaps the most persuasive tribute I ever encountered was delivered by the highly cerebral New Orleans singer, songwriter, arranger and pianist extraordinaire, Allen Toussaint. I was trying to get at some of the reasons for the dramatic expansion of his own songwriting aspirations (musically, poetically, politically) in the Seventies, when he graduated from brilliant pop cameos like "Ride Your Pony" and "Mother in Law" to more ambitious, post-Beatles, post-Miles, post–Civil Rights Era work. Was it the influence of Bob Dylan, say, that allowed him to contemplate a wider range of subjects, a greater length of songs? Oh, not at all, Allen replied in his cool, elegant manner; he wished he could agree with me, but his single greatest influence in terms of lyrics and storytelling from first to last was Chuck Berry. And with that he started quoting Chuck Berry lyrics, just as you or I might, just as Elvis Presley, Carl Perkins, and Jerry Lee Lewis do on the fabled "Million Dollar Quartet" session. "What a wonderful little story that is," he said of "You Never Can Tell," Chuck's fairy-tale picture of young love in Creole-speaking Louisiana, "how he lived that life with that couple, you know. Oh, the man's a mountain," said Allen unhesitatingly, and then went on to quote some more."

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Transgender student: I am mad, I am upset, and I am invalidated

Transgender student: I am mad, I am upset, and I am invalidated | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"It hurt to have a federal bathroom guideline that protected transgender students taken away from the LGBT community. The Obama administration guideline stated that public schools had to let transgender students use the bathroom of the gender they identified as, or lose federal funding. This was a big step for the transgender community to be recognized like that on a federal level, and it was important for the students who didn't feel protected or safe.


"I know exactly what it feels like to not be protected in school. When I first tried to come out as transgender, I was in eighth grade. I thought I was ready at that time, so I decided to talk to my vice principal to let him know that I was transgender and that I was ready to go by a different name. I wanted to know what his plan would be to make me feel comfortable, safe and welcome."

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Typography Inspiration for the Modern Web · Typewolf

Typography Inspiration for the Modern Web · Typewolf | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Description by The Scout Report

 

"Typography enthusiasts, including professional graphic designers and those of us with a general fondness for font design, will enjoy TypeWolf, a website about "what's trending in type." Authored by professional designer Jeremiah Shoaf (whose clients include the Discovery Channel, Animal Planet, and The Washington Post to name just a few), TypeWolf features a number of interesting resources and articles. Anyone currently engaged in design projects, such as creating a website, flyer, or infographic, may want to start by checking out Font Recommendations & Lists. Here, visitors can explore Shoaf's top ten fonts that are underused, check out possible alternatives for the ubiquitous Helvetica, and learn where to find free fonts. Meanwhile, Web Fonts in the Wild features a new website (and font) each day, allowing designers to visualize how fonts shape the aesthetic character of different websites. Those interested in reading Shoaf's musings about new developments in the world of typography can do so via his Blog. Finally, the Guides & Resources section offers links to a variety of outside resources including online books, blogs, and more."

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Banks and Tech Firms Battle Over Something Akin to Gold: Your Data :: NY Times

Banks and Tech Firms Battle Over Something Akin to Gold: Your Data :: NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
The big banks and Silicon Valley are waging an escalating battle over your personal financial data: your dinner bill last night, your monthly mortgage payment, the interest rates you pay.

Technology companies like Mint and Betterment have been eager to slurp up this data, mainly by building services that let people link all their various bank-account and credit-card information. The selling point is to make budgeting and bookkeeping easier. But the data is also being used to offer new kinds of loans and investment products.

Now, banks have decided they aren’t letting the data go without a fight.
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nukem777's curator insight, March 26, 10:28 PM

Yup, and you better hurry up and own it!

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The Neuroscience of Trust

The Neuroscience of Trust | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Consider Gallup’s meta-analysis of decades’ worth of data: It shows that high engagement—defined largely as having a strong connection with one’s work and colleagues, feeling like a real contributor, and enjoying ample chances to learn—consistently leads to positive outcomes for both individuals and organizations. The rewards include higher productivity, better-quality products, and increased profitability.

"So it’s clear that creating an employee-centric culture can be good for business. But how do you do that effectively? Culture is typically designed in an ad hoc way around random perks like gourmet meals or “karaoke Fridays,” often in thrall to some psychological fad. And despite the evidence that you can’t buy higher job satisfaction, organizations still use golden handcuffs to keep good employees in place. While such efforts might boost workplace happiness in the short term, they fail to have any lasting effect on talent retention or performance.

"In my research I’ve found that building a culture of trust is what makes a meaningful difference. Employees in high-trust organizations are more productive, have more energy at work, collaborate better with their colleagues, and stay with their employers longer than people working at low-trust companies. They also suffer less chronic stress and are happier with their lives, and these factors fuel stronger performance."

 

Jim Lerman's insight

 

Very well researched article, very clearly presented. Offers 8 actionable strategies organizations (not just companies) can use to improve performance as well as personal engagement and satisfaction. This holds just as true for the classroom as the boardroom. Well worth reading.

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donhornsby's curator insight, March 26, 10:32 AM
Compared with people at low-trust companies, people at high-trust companies report: 74% less stress, 106% more energy at work, 50% higher productivity, 13% fewer sick days, 76% more engagement, 29% more satisfaction with their lives, 40% less burnout.
 
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20 Ideas for Professional Development in the Digital Age

20 Ideas for Professional Development in the Digital Age | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
What is professional development?  It is pretty much anything that helps one develop professionally. At the heart, professional development is about growth and learning.  In the field of education, it seems like many quickly think of educational opportunities that mimic what they see in their schools. As a result, they turn professional learning and education into schooling.  The problem with that is that schooling is too limiting.  In this age, there are many other exciting and high-impact learning opportunities for teachers that extend beyond traditional notions of schooling.  When we hear the phrase “professional development,” certain practices likely come to mind, things like in-services and conferences. In the digital age, there are countless other opportunities for professional development and restricting one’s thoughts to just a few options limits our insight into what is possible for our students.  With that in mind, here is a brainstorm of 20 options available to educators today. This is far from an exhaustive list, but it is enough to start exploring the possibilities.  Feel free to suggest others in a comment to this post.

 

Learn more:

 

Professional Development: WHY EDUcators And TEACHers Can’t Catch UP THAT Quickly AND How-To Change It

 

LEARNing To LEARN For MY Professional Development | I Did It MY Way

 

 

 


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Victor Ventura's curator insight, March 18, 9:46 AM
Anything goes in PD. Make it work for you in terms of time, location, in person/online, source, funding, and your preference for individual, small team, district, or strangers. 
Danny Castaño's curator insight, March 21, 12:22 AM
We can found in this article 20 different ideas in order to go beyond traditional practices since we are in a digital area with new desires and expectations from students about their learning process and for that we need to grow professionally as teachers. We can highlight some of the most relvevan ones such as "The Webinar with live sessions, Video Tutorials even when is one of the most common strategies,  is really helpful to our professional development, Graduate Courses and Programs online as well to get more knowledge about topics of interest, and other such as Accountability Partners, Training Programs and so on. We need to keep in mind that teachers can't never stop learning.
Наталия Вяткина's curator insight, March 26, 4:20 AM
Professional development for teachers themselves, as personalities, adult people, universally, independently from schooling is very interesting idea, humanistic , and useful for school eventually

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How to Fix a Broken Educational System - Without Any More Money

How to Fix a Broken Educational System - Without Any More Money | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Seema Bansal is forging a path to public education reform for 15,000 schools in Haryana, India with an ambitious goal: by 2020, 80% of children should have grade-level knowledge. She's looking to meet this goal by seeking reforms that will work in every school without additional resources. Bansal and her team have found success using creative, straightforward techniques—such as they such as communicating with teachers using SMS group chats—and they have already measurably improved learning and engagement in Haryana's schools.

"Seema leads BCG's Social Impact practice in India, and works on disparate projects in fields including education, food security and nutrition, and governance within government agencies."

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The Evolution of a Twenty-First-Century Digital Classroom

The Evolution of a Twenty-First-Century Digital Classroom | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"To achieve success in education, the technology revolution must be accompanied by a revolution of ideas on how to transform classrooms for teachers and students. This requires a holistic approach to change management in schools, composed of four building blocks. (See Exhibit 2.)"

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 24, 6:23 AM
The Evolution of a Twenty-First-Century Digital Classroom
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How Education Technology Can Help Foster Social and Emotional Skills

How Education Technology Can Help Foster Social and Emotional Skills | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"...a new global survey conducted by The Boston Consulting Group (BCG) found that parents and educators have a narrow understanding of SEL. They view SEL primarily as a means of achieving better classroom discipline rather than as a way of ensuring better academic and economic outcomes over the long term.

 

"Education technology can help address this and other key barriers to fostering SEL while complementing and extending children’s learning experiences, according to a new report by the World Economic Forum titled New Vision for Education: Fostering Social and Emotional Learning through Technology, written in collaboration with BCG. Education technology can personalize learning, engage the disengaged, complement what happens in the classroom, extend education outside the classroom, and provide access to learning to students who otherwise might not have sufficient educational opportunities.

 

"To date, however, most of the learning strategies commonly used to develop social and emotional skills do not use technology or use it in only a limited way. While many parents and educators recognize the potential for education technology to build social and emotional skills, they do not fully understand which technologies hold the most promise or how to use them best. For example, in the US, 67% of teachers believe technology is best used for foundational subjects, such as literacy and numeracy; in comparison, only 43% believe it is best used for social and emotional skills—results that are similar to findings in other countries.

 

"The report finds that policy makers, parents, educators, and others seeking to use technology to give children the social and emotional skills they need can pursue three critical opportunities:

 

"Help parents, educators, and others understand what really boosts social and emotional learning. On the basis of our extensive research, we have identified 55 product features (detailed in the report) that are highly correlated with the ten critical social and emotional skills.

 

"Embed SEL into products that support foundational skills such as literacy and numeracy, where 95% of venture-capital investment dollars directed to education technology have flowed since 2011.

 

"Take advantage of recent technological innovations—such as wearable devices, virtual reality, and apps—to foster SEL."

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Chris Carter's curator insight, March 25, 9:26 AM
A year-old article that rings true with several recently released pieces of research. 
Oskar Almazan's curator insight, March 25, 10:39 AM
Parents, educators, and others seeking to use technology to give children the social and emotional skills they need can pursue three critical opportunities: "Help parents, educators, and others understand what really boosts social and emotional learning. On the basis of our extensive research, we have identified 55 product features (detailed in the report) that are highly correlated with the ten critical social and emotional skills. "Embed SEL into products that support foundational skills such as literacy and numeracy, where 95% of venture-capital investment dollars directed to education technology have flowed since 2011. "Take advantage of recent technological innovations—such as wearable devices, virtual reality, and apps—to foster SEL."
Gemma Ballarín's curator insight, March 26, 5:39 PM
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A Glimpse Inside the Coffers: Endowment Spending at Wealthy Colleges and Universities - The Education Trust

A Glimpse Inside the Coffers: Endowment Spending at Wealthy Colleges and Universities - The Education Trust | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Amid intense national conversations on income inequality, A Glimpse Inside the Coffers finds that extreme wealth stratification is occurring not only among individuals, but also among institutions of higher education. This report reveals that in 2013, roughly 3.6 percent of colleges and universities — 138 in all — held 75 percent of all postsecondary endowment wealth. Yet despite their vast wealth, too few of these colleges invest enough in students from low-income families.

Dubbed by Ed Trust as the “$500 million club,” these 138 institutions each held at least half-a-billion dollars in endowment assets in 2013. And these colleges benefit tremendously from their endowments since there is no required spending threshold and these funds are tax-exempt.

But as Ed Trust research reveals, nearly half of institutions in the “$500 million club” are in the bottom 5 percent nationally for their enrollment of first-time, full-time Pell Grant recipients. Moreover, nearly 4 in 5 of these wealthy institutions have an annual net price for low-income students that exceeds 60 percent of their annual family income. These colleges can and should do more to enroll a greater number of low-income students and to make college more affordable.
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Platform Companies Are Becoming More Powerful — but What Exactly Do They Want? :: NY Times

Platform Companies Are Becoming More Powerful — but What Exactly Do They Want? :: NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Platforms are, in a sense, capitalism distilled to its essence. They are proudly experimental and maximally consequential, prone to creating externalities and especially disinclined to address or even acknowledge what happens beyond their rising walls. And accordingly, platforms are the underlying trend that ties together popular narratives about technology and the economy in general. Platforms provide the substructure for the “gig economy” and the “sharing economy”; they’re the economic engine of social media; they’re the architecture of the “attention economy” and the inspiration for claims about the “end of ownership.”

But the tensions that platforms like Uber create with their customers, their workers and the world that surrounds them will soon become harder to ignore as these companies foment economic and social change, the consequences of which will increasingly be thrust into spectacular display.
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Flying cars to be tested by end of 2017, says Airbus

Flying cars to be tested by end of 2017, says Airbus | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
One of the world's biggest aerospace companies plans to test a prototype of a flying car by the end of this year, a move that could be a big step towards easing congestion on urban roads.
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Chuck Berry, Rock ’n’ Roll Pioneer, Dies at 90 :: NY Times

Chuck Berry, Rock ’n’ Roll Pioneer, Dies at 90 :: NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Chuck Berry, who with his indelible guitar licks, brash self-confidence and memorable songs about cars, girls and wild dance parties did as much as anyone to define rock ’n’ roll’s potential and attitude in its early years, died on Saturday at his home near Wentzville, Mo. He was 90.

"While Elvis Presley was rock’s first pop star and teenage heartthrob, Mr. Berry was its master theorist and conceptual genius, the songwriter who understood what the kids wanted before they knew themselves. With songs like “Johnny B. Goode” and “Roll Over Beethoven,” he gave his listeners more than they knew they were getting from jukebox entertainment.

"His guitar lines wired the lean twang of country and the bite of the blues into phrases with both a streamlined trajectory and a long memory. And tucked into the lighthearted, telegraphic narratives that he sang with such clear enunciation was a sly defiance, upending convention to claim the pleasures of the moment."

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Chuck Berry, Fiery and Flinty Rock ’n’ Roll Innovator :: NY Times

Chuck Berry, Fiery and Flinty Rock ’n’ Roll Innovator :: NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Mr. Berry, who died on Saturday at his home near St. Louis, was the first true rock ’n’ roll superstar. When in his late 20s he emerged from St. Louis onto the national scene, the genre wasn’t yet codified. In its infancy, rock was hybrid music, and Mr. Berry was its most vivid and imaginative alchemist.

From the mid-1950s through the end of that decade, he concocted a yowling blend of hopped-up blues, country and then-emergent rhythm & blues that ended up as the template for what became widely accepted as rock ’n’ roll (though the term predated his rise).

He gave it virtuoso playing via guitar work that drew on country and the blues. He made it a songwriting genre with wry, detailed lyrics that helped shape the idea of American freedom via stories of teenage abandon or open-road adventure. He embodied the music by giving it physical language, from his signature duck walk to his coiffure, which was equal parts structure and flair. (He also was a beautician, having studied hairdressing and cosmetology when he was still playing in small bands in St. Louis in the early 1950s.) And in performance, he sold the music hard, with eyes bulging, hips swaying and a sly smile that indicated he knew just how much he was pushing the envelope.
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Literary Hub

Literary  Hub | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Lit Hub is a central place for writers, publishers, books, bookstores, librarians, and readers to congregate and celebrate books and literary culture."

 

Description by The Scout Report

 

"Literary Hub is an online magazine that strives to be "a single, trusted, daily source for all the news, ideas and richness of contemporary literary life." To do so, Literary Hub partners with a wide variety of sources for literary news and reviews, including publishers, bookstores, and literary journals. Readers will find book reviews, author profiles, interviews, essays, book excerpts, and more. Those looking for a new read may want to start with Bookmarks, a feature that helpfully compiles critical reviews of new books from major publications. Readers can then see how these reviewers assessed the book (reviews are categorized as Rave, Positive, Mixed or Pan) and read these reviews in full. Meanwhile, readers can explore a number of original pieces in Features. As of this write up, recent pieces in Features include an essay by novelist and short story writer Jhumpa Lahiri and a profile of author Jami Attenberg. Those who want to stay informed about literary news may want to sign up for Lit Hub Daily, a regular round-up of literary news from Literary Hub and other publications and organizations."

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