:: The 4th Era ::
Follow
Find tag "sustainability"
70.4K views | +4 today
:: The 4th Era ::
Exploration of the new era in human history marked by invention of the Internet
Curated by Jim Lerman
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Into the Driver's Seat
Scoop.it!

A Design Challenge to Students: Solve a Real-World Problem! ~ MindShift

A Design Challenge to Students: Solve a Real-World Problem! ~ MindShift | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

by Ian Quillen

 

"Creating a safe recreation space for teens; protoyping a recyclable lunch tray; setting up a water delivery system to guard against urban fires; building a public awareness campaign to combat hunger. These are just a few of examples of the types of tasks students are taking on when they participate in the Design Learning Challenge, an effort to get students to figure out how to solve real-world problems in their communities.

 

"Combining project-based learning, with an emphasis on the arts and design thinking, this academic competition now in its third year — a partnership between the Industrial Designers Society of America, or IDSA, and the National Art Education Association, or NAEA — has more than 750 students participating this year."


Via Rebecca White, Jim Lerman
more...
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, August 14, 2013 11:02 AM

Some good suggestions provided in a broad way.

Marnie McGillivray's curator insight, March 23, 8:33 PM

I have rescooped this resource from @Rebecca White as it is a great resource for teaching the Design and technology strand and incorporates sustainability. The website focuses on design thinking, 21st century learning skills, design learning research, curriculum frameworks, project based learning and engaging today’s students. It links with the Australian Curriculum for technology including design technology as it is build student computational thinking by getting them to create and evaluate projects which aims towards creating preferred futures.

Katherine Reed's curator insight, April 7, 10:34 PM

This is the background information for competitions that are coordinated between designers and educators to promote students thinking about how to solve real world problems using design.  There are links provided to sample problems and challenges suited for Prep to Year 4 levels as well as more in depth concepts for high school students, such as designing jobs for 2050.  Interesting read and plenty of information to be explored. 

Rescooped by Jim Lerman from visual data
Scoop.it!

Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic)

Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic) | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future.

 In the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned “arcology” - a word that combines “architecture” and “ecology," with a goal of building structures to house large populations in self-contained environments with a self-sustaining economy and agriculture. “In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri)
Via Lauren Moss
more...
luiy's curator insight, July 8, 2013 7:42 AM
For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future as giant structures that contain entire metropolises. To some, these buildings present the best means for cities to exist in harmony with nature, while others forsee grotesque monstrosities destructive to the human spirit. In the mid-20th century, engineer and futurist R. Buckminster Fuller imagined city-enclosing plastic domes and enormous housing projects resembling nuclear cooling towers. These ideas are impractical but they explore the limits of conventional architectural thinking.  Science fiction writers and artists often imagine future architecture that oppresses the human spirit. Megastructures such as the pyramid-like Tyrell Buildings of “Blade Runner” dominate a decrepit skyline. The decaying old city is simply covered with layers of newer, larger buildings in a process of “retrofitting.” Beginning in the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned a more humane approach. The word “arcology” is a combination of “architecture” and “ecology.” The goal is to build megastructures that would house a population of a million or more people, but in a self-contained environment with its own economy and agriculture. “In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri) In 1996, a group of 75 Japanese corporations commissioned Soleri to design the one-kilometer-tall Hyper Bulding, a vertical city for 100,000 people. Existing in harmony with nature, the Hyper Building was designed to recycle waste, produce food in greenhouses, and use the sun’s light and heat for power and climate control.  The structure was designed for passive heating and cooling without the need for machinery. An economic recession put the brakes on the project and it was never built. Soleri’s arcology concept is being put to the test in the Arcosanti experimental community being built in Arizona. Construction began in 1970. When complete the town will house 5,000 people. Buildings are composed of locally produced concrete and are designed to capture sunlight and heat. To be built in the desert near Abu Dhabi, Masdar is a 2.3-square-mile (6 sq km) planned city of 40,000 residents. Buildings are designed to reduce reliance on artificial lighting and air conditioning, and the city will run entirely on solar power and renewable energy. Begun in 2006, the project is planned for completion around 2020-2025.
Fàtima Galan's curator insight, July 9, 2013 5:44 AM

Amazing and beautiful analysis!! Believe it or not, the science fiction also has something to teach us about the city of tomorrow.