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:: The 4th Era ::
Exploration of the new era in human history marked by invention of the Internet
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Educational Research and the Design of Interactive Media


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45 Design Thinking Resources For Educators ~ TeachThought

45 Design Thinking Resources For Educators ~ TeachThought | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"In education, design thinking empowers students to realize that they can create their own futures by borrowing frameworks from other areas, which allows them to design their own participation and experiences. For example, game designer Katie Salen has talked about her students experiencing video game design and implementing those principles into the classroom; she said her students interact within a framework that allows them to take on social challenges as designers."

Jim Lerman's insight:

Very rich collection of links, each briefly described. Useful for the newcomer as well as those well-versed in the field.

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45 Design Thinking Resources for Educators - InformED

45 Design Thinking Resources for Educators - InformED | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

by Saga Briggs

 

"Teachers find design thinking to be an engaging pedagogical approach, because in order to create new solutions, you cannot help but learn about people and their interests, about business or math or science or engineering.

Plus, while students are learning the specific knowledge set required to develop a relevant and buildable solution, they’re also developing highly valuable skills such as empathy, the ability to collaborate, to deal with ambiguity, and, of course, to create. Design thinking offers a way to reshape the curriculum around experiences that engage students, and to shift physical classrooms based on feedback from students.

 

"Below are 45 design thinking resources you can use to lead this movement in your own classroom:"



Cited From: http://www.opencolleges.edu.au/informed/features/45-design-thinking-resources-for-educators/#ixzz2aZJy9Hye

Jim Lerman's insight:

Excellent collection of links to resources, each one briefly described.

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Visual Design: Understanding Color Theory and the Color Wheel

Visual Design: Understanding Color Theory and the Color Wheel | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Sometimes the toughest step in building a new website or redesign can be the conceptual ones. Selecting a color palette is one of them that can be tough if you don’t have the right tools. So where do you start?

 

 

It all comes down to basic color theory and the color wheel. That same tool that teachers used in school really is the basis for how designers plan and use color in almost every project from the simplest web page to expansive brands with multiple sites and campaigns...


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Design for Presentation: The great eye learns to see

A fable about using design to help your audience see your message clearly. And what to avoid. For directors, designers, instructional designers, and presenters.

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tom jackson's curator insight, February 25, 2013 9:06 AM

An effective way to engage your audience in learning principles of many content areas!

tom jackson's curator insight, February 25, 2013 9:07 AM

another idea for delivering your lessons, sometime we overlook the fable.  An effective way to engage your audience in learning principles of many content areas!

N Kaspar's curator insight, March 3, 2013 11:07 PM

An interesting example of how to use a fable to teach a subject.

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THE DESIGN GYM Handout Deck

This is our methodology at The Design Gym.
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Jim Lerman's curator insight, September 12, 2013 6:10 PM

The Design Gym is a relatively new, compact design firm in NYC that takes the process very seriously and has developed some clever and innovative ways to engage itself in the marketplace. This page contains a slideshare on the basic components of how these folks conceive of the design process. It's very nicely put together; and don't miss the "Presentation Transcript" below. It offers a kind of stream-of-consciouness narrative to elaborate on each of the slides.

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Use our methods - Bootcamp Bootleg | d.school, Stanford University

Use our methods - Bootcamp Bootleg | d.school, Stanford University | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Every year, we put together an overview of the current iteration of the design process we’re teaching, along with some of our most-used tools. The guide was originally intended for recent graduates of our Bootcamp: Adventures in Design Thinking class. But we’ve heard from folks who’ve never been to the d.school that have used it to create their own introductory experience to design thinking.  The Bootcamp Bootleg is more of a cook book than a text book, and more of a constant work-in-progress than a polished and permanent piece." 

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Jim Lerman's curator insight, August 3, 2013 3:38 AM

The Bootcamp Bootleg is a free resource from the Stanford dschool (design school) that leads viewers through the entire design process. An outstanding resource for implementation.

Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, August 4, 2013 8:46 PM

Great teaching and learning applications!

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Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic)

Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic) | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future.

 In the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned “arcology” - a word that combines “architecture” and “ecology," with a goal of building structures to house large populations in self-contained environments with a self-sustaining economy and agriculture. “In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri)
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luiy's curator insight, July 8, 2013 7:42 AM
For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future as giant structures that contain entire metropolises. To some, these buildings present the best means for cities to exist in harmony with nature, while others forsee grotesque monstrosities destructive to the human spirit. In the mid-20th century, engineer and futurist R. Buckminster Fuller imagined city-enclosing plastic domes and enormous housing projects resembling nuclear cooling towers. These ideas are impractical but they explore the limits of conventional architectural thinking.  Science fiction writers and artists often imagine future architecture that oppresses the human spirit. Megastructures such as the pyramid-like Tyrell Buildings of “Blade Runner” dominate a decrepit skyline. The decaying old city is simply covered with layers of newer, larger buildings in a process of “retrofitting.” Beginning in the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned a more humane approach. The word “arcology” is a combination of “architecture” and “ecology.” The goal is to build megastructures that would house a population of a million or more people, but in a self-contained environment with its own economy and agriculture. “In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri) In 1996, a group of 75 Japanese corporations commissioned Soleri to design the one-kilometer-tall Hyper Bulding, a vertical city for 100,000 people. Existing in harmony with nature, the Hyper Building was designed to recycle waste, produce food in greenhouses, and use the sun’s light and heat for power and climate control.  The structure was designed for passive heating and cooling without the need for machinery. An economic recession put the brakes on the project and it was never built. Soleri’s arcology concept is being put to the test in the Arcosanti experimental community being built in Arizona. Construction began in 1970. When complete the town will house 5,000 people. Buildings are composed of locally produced concrete and are designed to capture sunlight and heat. To be built in the desert near Abu Dhabi, Masdar is a 2.3-square-mile (6 sq km) planned city of 40,000 residents. Buildings are designed to reduce reliance on artificial lighting and air conditioning, and the city will run entirely on solar power and renewable energy. Begun in 2006, the project is planned for completion around 2020-2025.
Fàtima Galan's curator insight, July 9, 2013 5:44 AM

Amazing and beautiful analysis!! Believe it or not, the science fiction also has something to teach us about the city of tomorrow.

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The Future of Data Visualization Tools

The Future of Data Visualization Tools | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Data is everywhere and well-designed data graphics can be both beautiful and meaningful. As visualizations take center stage in a data-centric world, researchers and developers spend much time understanding and creating better visualizations. But they spend just as much time understanding how tools can help programmers and designers create visualizations faster, more effectively, and more enjoyably.

 

As any visualization practitioner will tell you, turning a dataset from raw stuff in a file to a final result in a picture is far from a single-track, linear path. Rather, there is a constant iteration of competing designs, tweaking and evaluating at once their pros and cons. The visualization research community has recognized the importance of keeping track of this process.

 

Read the complete article to learn more about the future of the practice and the tools that enable designers to create thoughtful infographics and visualizations...


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The 16 Most Compelling Infographics Of 2012

The 16 Most Compelling Infographics Of 2012 | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

2012 might be the year which we reached 'peak infographic'.

You can’t have an issue or a piece of data without putting it into a picture so it’s easier for people to understand. While this has mostly resulted in a glut of ugly graphics that don’t actually do anything with data (and you’ll see some of these below), it’s still an incredibly simple way to get information to you fast. And this year, some of our most compelling content has appeared in the format.

These are some of our favorites.


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Lauren Moss's curator insight, December 21, 2012 5:40 PM

A curated infographic gallery from FastCompany...

Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, December 21, 2012 10:09 PM

How do you tell a story with statistics?  How to you make visible the hidden and complex ideas hiding in the numbers?


Infographics is a solid answer for these questions. 


Take a look at some of the best!

Jean-Michel Bayle's curator insight, December 29, 2012 11:49 AM

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