:: The 4th Era ::
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:: The 4th Era ::
Exploration of the new era in human history marked by invention of the Internet
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Six Ways the Teacher's Role is Changing | #LEARNing2LEARN #ModernEDU

Six Ways the Teacher's Role is Changing | #LEARNing2LEARN #ModernEDU | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
During this time of significant educational change, we are forced to ask ourselves, what is the role of the teacher?

Teachers continue to be central to learning, but the role is changing significantly. Our children still need to develop real skills and real knowledge, but they also need to be self-reliant, resilient, and fully capable of re-inventing themselves. This means students must learn how to self-direct their learning.

So if students are self-directing their learning, what's the role of the teacher?

Teachers build the curriculum/lessons with the individual student based on his/her needs and interests rather than move through a fixed curriculum en masse.


Teachers provide the experiences and tools to access new knowledge in specific areas of interest as facilitators of individual pathways, rather than being a provider of the content or expert in one or every area,Teachers become experts in how people learn, not only in teaching.


Teachers support a community of learners in teams, possibly of multiple ages, rather than alone in classrooms with fixed grades of students.


Teachers have more autonomy over their daily schedule, and can be flexible to adjust their schedules to support student needs.


Teachers provide opportunities for real-world, connected, practical learning rather than isolated academics.
These are the types of changes in the teacher's role that are fundamental to developing students who are capable of independent learning and reinvention in a rapidly changing world.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/05/25/so-whats-the-change-for-teachers-in-21st-century-education/

 


Via Gust MEES, Jim Lerman
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Jan Swanepoel's curator insight, May 26, 7:31 PM
During a time of significant educational change, this article addresses the contemporary question: "What is the real role of the teacher?" Teachers continue to be central to learning and students still need to develop real skills and real knowledge, however 21st century learners also need to be self-reliant, resilient, and fully capable of re-inventing themselves, meaning that students must learn how to self-direct their learning. Please visit my blog at http://mymathsrules.weebly.com for my extended curator's insight.
PEEP Matisse's curator insight, May 29, 4:21 AM
On est loin des fondamentaux de l'Education Nationale, mais on peut rêver
Sarah's curator insight, June 4, 8:25 PM
This is a short article on the ways that teachers' roles are changing. It is important to note that teachers are not becoming obsolete, but are just as important as ever. Teachers are here to facilitate learning and assisting the students in becoming resilient, self directed and capable learners.
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5 great slides about technology, learning, and change | @mcleod

5 great slides about technology, learning, and change | @mcleod | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

by Scott McLoed

 

"Here are five great slides that I found recently in the Great Quotes About Learning and Change Flickr pool. Which one's your favorite?" 

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From recession's wake, education innovation blooms :: WRAL.com

From recession's wake, education innovation blooms :: WRAL.com | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

by Justin Pope

 

"As with so many innovations — from the light bulb to the Internet — the technology is bubbling up mostly from the United States, fueled by American capital chasing profitable solutions to American problems. But as with those past innovations, the impact will be global. In this case, it may be even more consequential in developing countries, where mass higher education is new and the changes could be built into emerging systems."

Jim Lerman's insight:

An interesting and wide-ranging overview of the current state of technology's impact on higher education. An even-handed view that supports technology, has a positive view of MOOCs, but sees that there is considerable worth in saving what works best in brick and mortar universities.

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Schools in Finland will no longer teach 'subjects' | EDUcation CHANGE | Teaching by Topic

Schools in Finland will no longer teach 'subjects' | EDUcation CHANGE | Teaching by Topic | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

For years, Finland has been the by-word for a successful education system, perched at the top of international league tables for literacy and numeracy.

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Pasi Silander, the city’s development manager, explained: “What we need now is a different kind of education to prepare people for working life.

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“Young people use quite advanced computers. In the past the banks had lots of  bank clerks totting up figures but now that has totally changed.

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“We therefore have to make the changes in education that are necessary for industry and modern society.”

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Subject-specific lessons – an hour of history in the morning, an hour of geography in the afternoon – are already being phased out for 16-year-olds in the city’s upper schools. They are being replaced by what the Finns call “phenomenon” teaching – or teaching by topic. For instance, a teenager studying a vocational course might take “cafeteria services” lessons, which would include elements of maths, languages (to help serve foreign customers), writing skills and communication skills.

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More academic pupils would be taught cross-subject topics such as the European Union - which would merge elements of economics, history (of the countries involved), languages and geography.

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Via Gust MEES, John Rudkin, Shaona Williams
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jmoreillon's curator insight, March 27, 2015 9:42 AM

This is what school librarians have been doing forever!

María Florencia Perrone's curator insight, April 8, 2015 4:00 PM

The world around us is not labelled or divided in categories, then why is academic content? Can we not relate topics and elaborate meaning on the basis of relationships and intertwined data? 

Dr. Helen Teague's curator insight, April 13, 2015 9:11 PM

I wonder if this would work in the U.S.? Also, in Finland, students do not take standardized tests until the end of high school (Zhao, 2012, p. 111), so thankfully, perhaps the drill and kill process is diminished.


*Zhao, Y. (2012). World Class Learners. 

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MIT Media Lab, d.school Point the Way Toward Decentralized, Networked Learning | Mediashift | PBS

MIT Media Lab, d.school Point the Way Toward Decentralized, Networked Learning | Mediashift | PBS | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

by Aran Levasseur

 

TECHNOLOGY ISN’T ENOUGH

 

"In education, digital technology and 21st century learning have become quite fashionable. Schools that have the resources to integrate digital tools are eager to do so. But digital tools are only the beginning. They are intimations of greater changes to come. It will be the novel and creative ways that people interact using technology that will generate the innovation all sectors of our society are looking for. If flattening hierarchies and decentralizing control are previews of coming attractions, then what does that mean for education?

 

"Let’s start with the classroom. Flattening hierarchies and decentralizing control would increase autonomy and augment network interaction. A flattened hierarchy would transform the teacher from an omnipotent silo of knowledge to more of a designer, coach and guide. This would enable greater autonomy for students to pursue what intrinsically motivates them within an environment shaped by design thinking and under the guidance of a teacher. Greater network interaction would emphasize collaboration versus individual achievement. With an Internet connection via a smartphone, tablet or laptop, a learning network would be rooted in the local environment but limited only by one’s imagination. Integral to this structural shift is the collapse of departmental walls and cultivation of multidisciplinary thinking. This is not your father’s or mother’s school. But it is the kind of learning your can find at two of the world’s premier universities: MIT and Stanford."

Jim Lerman's insight:

A penetrating essay that traces the growth of human social organization through the impacts made by developing technologies, a view that i favor.

Well worth reading and thinking about.

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decentralisedteaching's curator insight, October 20, 2014 5:56 AM

Interesting article on how some of the top universities  in the US (Stanford, MIT) are pushing Decentralised, Networked Learning!

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Finding the narrative: a key to leading a university

Finding the narrative: a key to leading a university | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
What sets #university leaders apart from peers in business? Storytelling - @UniofAdelaide's Warren Bebbington http://t.co/iYJpxJhESq

Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's comment, February 24, 2013 3:04 PM
Thanks for your comment Ken and glad you found the article useful!
Christine Cavanaugh-Simmons's curator insight, February 25, 2013 1:35 PM

Dean Lyons at Haas is another great exemplar!!

Karen Dietz's comment, February 26, 2013 9:53 PM
Thanks for the addition Christine!