The 21st Century Information Literate Learner
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A Diagram Of 21st Century Pedagogy -

A Diagram Of 21st Century Pedagogy - | The 21st Century Information Literate Learner | Scoop.it
“ A diagram of 21st century pedagogy for the purpose of 21st century learning.”
Via Yasemin Allsop
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Top 9 TED Talks on Information Overload

Top 9 TED Talks on Information Overload | The 21st Century Information Literate Learner | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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What Teachers Need to Know about Information Overload ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

What Teachers Need to Know about Information Overload ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | The 21st Century Information Literate Learner | Scoop.it

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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The Latest Tools for Teaching STEM: Video Games - U.S. News & World Report

The Latest Tools for Teaching STEM: Video Games - U.S. News & World Report | The 21st Century Information Literate Learner | Scoop.it
“ U.S. News & World Report The Latest Tools for Teaching STEM: Video Games U.S.”
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How Discovery Engines Can Help You Manage Information Overload

How Discovery Engines Can Help You Manage Information Overload | The 21st Century Information Literate Learner | Scoop.it
Curated from the original article by Robin Good:"Managing information overload requires tools that deliver “awareness” of topics and filter out irrelevant information will become indispensable.The challenge is do to so without loosing the ability to make unexpected discoveries.Content discovery engines provide several advantages over other tools.These are: 1) Follow topics, not people: ...Content discovery engines help manage information overload because they are focused on topics, rather than people.2) Go directly to the Source and avoid distractions: ...Social networks and publishing platforms are not a good place for information professionals to be productive. Such platforms want users to stay on their sites as long as possible. 3) Monitor one channel instead of twenty-five: The focus on specific topics that characterizes discovery engines allows users to stay informed in one single place. 4) Discover the unexpected: A discovery engine allows users to learn what they don’t know about a topic and observe events that, for them, are unexpected.5) Benefit from others’ curation efforts: Most content discovery engines engage users in the curation process. This can accelerate the identification of the most valuable content before having to read it. Insights can be gained on whether a piece of content is worth consuming based on a number of user-generated indicators such as tags, comments, ratings, summaries and so on.Read the full article here: http://www.darwineco.com/blog/bid/76324/How-to-Manage-Information-Overload-6-Ways-Discovery-Engines-Help
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Study Explodes the Myth of Internet-Based Information Overload

Study Explodes the Myth of Internet-Based Information Overload | The 21st Century Information Literate Learner | Scoop.it
“Listen to enough hysterical warnings and dire forecasts and you’d think that information overload is leading us to some kind of bleak, post-apocalyptic future.” In an Advertising Age column he wrote back in 2007, Edelman Senior VP Steve Rubel said, “A crash is coming, folks. But this time it’s not financial—it’s personal.” The attention crisis, he said, is an epidemic. “There’s no more room at the inn. People will cut back.” Outlets ranging from The New York Times to Lifehack.org have addressed the consequences of too much online information... But now, there’s proof that all this worry about information overload, message meltdown and attention crash is overinflated hyperventilating. A study out of Northwestern University finds that “very few Americans feel bogged down or overwhelmed by the volume of news and information at their fingertips and on their screens.” Published in the journal The Information Society, the findings were based on seven focus groups with 77 participants from around the country. According to study author Eszter Hargittai, associate professor of communication studies, “We found that the high volume of information available these days seems to make most people feel empowered and enthusiastic. People are able to get their news and information from a diverse set of sources and they seem to like having those options.” Study participants were asked specifically about the volume of content at their fingertips, but few said anything about feeling overwhelmed or suffering from overload. According to a report on the study, typical responses included the following: - Participants had near-unanimous enthusiasm about the new media environment - Online news was regarded more positively than TV news - Cable news was often criticized for its sensationalism and stream of repetitive stories - Trivial social media posts and opinionated political pundits are top sources of frustration when seeking information In fact, rather than feeling buried by information, people are getting more critical of its quality. “But these frustrations were accompanied by enthusiasm and excitement on a more general level about overall media choices,” Hargittai said. As for the few who did feel overwhelmed, these tended to be participants with low levels of Internet skill, people who can’t navigate search engine results or filter through social media updates. Incidentally, if you’re shaking your head at the idea that information overload is an overblown issue because of the amount of information you deal with at work, that’s another story! There’s ample data to support employee claims of being buried in information; the email inbox alone is enough to drive some people over the edge. Fortunately, IABC’s Research Foundation has produced a report on sources and solutions for the enterprise overload problem.
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