The 20 percent project
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The 20 percent project
Google's company concept applied to education allowing students to work on self-directed projects of choice.
Curated by Stacey Marten
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10 Reasons To Try 20% Time In The Classroom - Edudemic

10 Reasons To Try 20% Time In The Classroom - Edudemic | The 20 percent project | Scoop.it
Google does it. Your classroom could too. Why not try a little creative thinking with 20% time in the classroom?
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10 Practical Ideas For Better Project-Based Learning In Your Classroom

10 Practical Ideas For Better Project-Based Learning In Your Classroom | The 20 percent project | Scoop.it
10 Practical Ideas For Better Project-Based Learning In Your Classroom
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Project-Based Learning Idea: Students Create Their Own Viral Video

Project-Based Learning Idea: Students Create Their Own Viral Video | The 20 percent project | Scoop.it
Looking for a project-based learning idea? Have students assemble their very own viral video. You never know - it might take off!
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Project Based Learning - LiveBinder

A guide to standards-focused Project-Based Learning.
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And another. This one offers more tools rather than overview.

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Designing 20% Time in Education

Designing 20% Time in Education | The 20 percent project | Scoop.it
A.J. Juliani is a co-founder of Education Is My Life. He currently is a K-12 Technology Staff Developer overseeing a 1:1 initiative. There is a movement happening in education right now. Maybe you’...
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Which type are you? See if you can change your mind set.

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What is the 20% Project in Education? - The Tech Classroom

This site is designed for English Language Arts teachers at the middle and high school levels. The content of this site is geared toward bringing 21st Century Learning Skills into the English classroom.
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Ready to get started? Here you go.

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The 20% Project (like Google) In My Class

The 20% Project (like Google) In My Class | The 20 percent project | Scoop.it
*Update: If you'd like to learn more about running your own 20% Project - check out our latest post: Designing 20% Time in Education I recently assigned a new project to my 11th grade English stude...
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White Paper: Project-Based vs. Problem-Based Learning: Which Is Better for the Common Core?

White Paper: Project-Based vs. Problem-Based Learning: Which Is Better for the Common Core? | The 20 percent project | Scoop.it

The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) place an emphasis on process, not just content. Yes, teaching content knowledge is important, but it's even more important to teach the learning process, so students become independent learners who can obtain knowledge on their own. After all, gathering knowledge is a skill that students will need in the future, when there no longer is a teacher "giving them" the facts.


Via Karen Bonanno
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You'll have to sign on to the White Papers in order to actually view the paper.

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Karen Bonanno's curator insight, February 25, 2013 3:31 PM

Their verdict: Both project-based learning and problem-based learning are highly effective ways to bring the Common Core State Standards alive in your classroom. Although some educators argue that one way is more authentic or rigorous than the other, it really just depends on how it is done.

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If students designed their own schools...

The best small town in America experiments with self-directed learning at its public high school. A group of students gets to create their own school-within-...
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What You Need To Know About Self-Directed Learning

What You Need To Know About Self-Directed Learning | The 20 percent project | Scoop.it
What You Need To Know About Self-Directed Learning
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The 8 Elements Project-Based Learning Must Have - Edudemic

The 8 Elements Project-Based Learning Must Have - Edudemic | The 20 percent project | Scoop.it
If you're contemplating using Project-Based Learning or are already trying out the latest craze to hit the modern classroom, you should know about this checklist.
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An Introduction to Project-Based Learning

An Introduction to Project-Based Learning | The 20 percent project | Scoop.it
An Introduction to Project-Based Learning
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20%=PBL

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Project Based Learning - LiveBinder

Links for the DEN Spring Virtual Conference 2011
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Project Based Learning ideas pair well with 20 percent idea. Great site.

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I teach. I think.: Give your students 20% time to do whatever they want

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I think. I like. The 20% project.

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Atmosphere of Innovation: What's Your 20% Project? - Getting Smart by Adam Renfro - 20% Time, creative, Innovation, leadership

Atmosphere of Innovation: What's Your 20% Project? - Getting Smart by Adam Renfro - 20% Time, creative, Innovation, leadership | The 20 percent project | Scoop.it
Once you become a creator, innovator or producer, you can then leave your mark. There's nothing like that feeling. You will be a different person. The sheer pleasure you take in your project . . . the control that you have over your own project .
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Background and theory behind 20%.

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$1 Million TED Education Prize Goes to ‘School in the Cloud’

$1 Million TED Education Prize Goes to ‘School in the Cloud’ | The 20 percent project | Scoop.it

"The Washington Post is reporting that the first TED Prize for education innovation has been awarded to Sugata Mitra, the originator of the idea of “School in the Cloud,” which will allow Indian students to engage in self-directed learning in a setting described as a virtual computer lab. The prize, which totals $1 million, will go towards making Mitra’s plans a reality."


Via EDTECH@UTRGV
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This is what our goal is.

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7 Essential Principles of Innovative Learning | MindShift

7 Essential Principles of Innovative Learning | MindShift | The 20 percent project | Scoop.it

Researchers at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) launched the Innovative Learning Environments project to turn an academic lens on the project of identifying concrete traits that mark innovative learning environments. They sifted through and categorized the research on learning science, documented case studies, and compiled policy recommendations they hope will transform the current system.

Their book, The Nature of Learning: Using Research to Inspire Practice and the accompanying practitioner’s guide, lay out the key principles for designing learning environments that will help students build skills useful in a world where jobs are increasingly information and knowledge-based. The principles are not job-specific – no one knows what the future economy will demand. Instead, the main goal is to develop self-directed learners, students with “adaptive expertise.”

“Adaptive expertise tries to push beyond the idea of mastery,” said Jennifer Groff, an educational engineer and co-founder of the Center for Curriculum Redesign. “You may be proficient, but without adaptive expertise you can get stuck very quickly as the world shifts.”

[RELATED READING: How Can Teachers Prepare Kids for a Connected World]

Groff doesn’t dispute that mastery is important and that students need to learn age-appropriate content, but she also argues it’s equally important to develop students’ ability to go beyond that, to question and apply learning in new situations.

To that end, these are their identified principles for innovative learning.

1.Learners have to be at the center of what happens in the classroom with activities focused on their cognition and growth. They have to actively engage in learning in order to become self-regulated learners who are able to control their emotions and motivations during the study process, set goals, and monitor their own learning process.2. Learning is a social practice and can’t happen alone. “By our nature we are social beings and we learn by interacting,” Groff said. “We learn by pushing and pulling on concepts with one another.” Structured, collaborative group work can be good for all learners; it pushes people in different ways.3. Emotions are an integral part of learning. Students understand ideas better when there’s interplay between emotions, motivation and cognition, so positive beliefs about oneself are a core part of reaching a more profound understanding. The power of emotions and motivation in the classroom are well documented, but often overlooked because they are “soft.” Still most teachers know that if a student is upset about something that happened at home or in school, he won’t learn well. Similarly, keeping students motivated should be the starting point of learning. If students understand why it matters, learning becomes more important to them.4. Learners are different and innovative learning environments reflect the various experiences and prior knowledge that each student brings to class. “You really want practices and processes that help teachers engage each student where they are,” said Groff. This principle is understood by every frustrated educator teaching to a “middle” that doesn’t exist.5. Students need to be stretched, but not too much. “It’s really critical to find that student’s sweet spot,” Groff Said. Educators should try to prevent both coasting and overloading. Students need to experience both academic success and the challenge of discovery. In a diverse classroom group work can help achieve this as students at different levels help one another.6. Assessment should be for learning, not of learning. Assessments are important, but only to gauge how to structure the next lesson for maximum effectiveness. It should be meaningful, substantial, and shape the learning environment itself. “Good teachers do this informally most of the time,” Groff said. “But when it’s done well and more formally it’s a whole structure and methodology where you collect feedback on the learning pathway and it drives the next step that you take.”7. Learning needs to be connected across disciplines and reach out into the real world. Learning can’t be meaningful if students don’t understand why the knowledge will be useful to them, how it can be applied in life. Understanding the connections between subjects and ideas is essential for the ability to transfer skills and adapt. “We can’t just have things remain in silos that never interact,” Groff said.

IMPLEMENTING THE PRINCIPLES

Many of the seven principles Groff outlines are second nature to good teachers, but they can feel hard to achieve within education systems that are slow-moving, bureaucratic and resistant to change. Still Groff says there are ways for teachers who want to create an innovative learning environment to begin down the path, even without the full support of their colleagues and administration. Groff also hopes shifting to the Common Core could offer openings for building in these practices. “It’s designed in a way that condones a lot of the principles that we’ve been talking about,” she said.

Everyone knows the common barriers educators face: the school culture, the students and themselves. Groff says with some reflection and problem solving, teachers can often begin to work around these barriers. An educator might think she’s open to innovation without realizing that there are preconceived notions about how one should teach that are deeply ingrained.

“You may be proficient, but without adaptive expertise you can get stuck very quickly as the world shifts.”

What’s more, if the school culture does not encourage experimentation, educators can mitigate negative reaction by framing the ideas in a way that will be accepted, or by bringing in outside resources to try and convince naysayers. Even finding one colleague in or outside of the school to bounce ideas with can make the process much smoother.

Educators can also test ideas with students before implementing them. Students have been indoctrinated into the same educational mindset about what makes a “useful” education as everyone else, and some might be resistant to new teaching methodologies. Without their enthusiasm it can be hard to persevere through other obstacles.

CASE STUDY

The darling of the Innovative Learning Environment case studies is the Jenaplan School in Germany. It’s one of the few schools embodying all the principles fluidly. The school has about 450 students that range three to 20 years old. Students aren’t broken up into grade levels, instead they learn in mixed-age groups as well as in groups of roughly the same age. Learning is directed by students, often project-based, evaluated primarily through writing and projects, self-assessments and peer-assessment. The schedule is periodic, focusing on a topic like geography or history for three to four weeks and crossing into multiple disciplines. The teacher is seen as an active mentor and coordinator and the school has active parental involvement.

The Jenaplan School has won awards for its model and in the eyes of the Innovative Learning Environment researchers is doing an excellent job at preparing students to be adaptive and nimble thinkers in a knowledge-based world.

 


Via Lynnette Van Dyke
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Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, March 5, 2013 1:13 PM

Every educator wants to create an environment that will foster students' love of learning. The criteria are intangible...