TerroirOR
41 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Marina Zurkow
Scoop.it!

Locating Value in Artisan Cheese: Reverse Engineering Terroir for New-World Landscapes - Paxson - 2010 - American Anthropologist - Wiley Online Library

Locating Value in Artisan Cheese: Reverse Engineering Terroir for New-World Landscapes - Paxson - 2010 - American Anthropologist - Wiley Online Library | TerroirOR | Scoop.it

ABSTRACT Terroir, the taste of place, is being adapted by artisan cheesemakers in the United States to reveal the range of values—agrarian, environmental, social, and gastronomic—that they believe constitute their cheese and distinguish artisan from commodity production. Some see themselves as reverse engineering terroir cheeses to create place though environmental stewardship and rural economic revitalization. But a tension is produced: while warranting projects of reterritorialization through defetishized food production, terroir marketing may risk turning the concept of “terroir” into a commodity fetish. U.S. terroir talk reveals attempts to reconcile the economic and sociomoral values that producers invest in artisan cheese.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marina Zurkow
Scoop.it!

Fresh From Vermont’s Maples, a Taste of Terroir - New York Times

Fresh From Vermont’s Maples, a Taste of Terroir - New York Times | TerroirOR | Scoop.it
Does that French concept of goût de terroir — the taste of place — apply to maple syrup?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marina Zurkow
Scoop.it!

Kevin Pogue Seeks Washington State’s Top Terroir - The Pour

Kevin Pogue Seeks Washington State’s Top Terroir - The Pour | TerroirOR | Scoop.it
A geology professor, Kevin Pogue, leads the search for Washington State’s most distinctive vineyard sites.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marina Zurkow
Scoop.it!

BPA- Power of The Columbia- The Geologic Story

BPA- Power of The Columbia- The Geologic Story | TerroirOR | Scoop.it
Bonneville Power Administration, the Power of the Columbia River- a text, audio, video look at our great NW resource.
Marina Zurkow's insight:

Lake Missoula Flood - 18 thousand years ago 

Eighteen thousand years ago the Columbia Basin was nearly covered by floodwaters when an ice dam at Lake Missoula in western Montana broke. Large boulders were strewn near the outlet of the Lower Coulee (Lake Lenore). Other boulders were carried in icebergs as far as western Oregon. The floodwaters were 800 feet (250 meters) deep near Pasco and 400 feet (125 meters) deep at Portland.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marina Zurkow
Scoop.it!

Early Morning (1825), Samuel Palmer

Early Morning (1825), Samuel Palmer | TerroirOR | Scoop.it
Visionary often suggests blurry, misty, something vague. It's as if revelations always came with a loss of focus. The rational is distinct. The mystical is ghostly. We often see Turner as a visionary artist.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marina Zurkow
Scoop.it!

Robert Gray (sea captain) (Wikipedia)

Robert Gray (May 10, 1755 – c. July, 1806) was an American merchant sea-captain who is known for his achievements in connection with two trading voyages to the northern Pacific coast of North America, between 1790 and 1793, which pioneered the American maritime fur trade in that region. In the course of those voyages, Gray explored portions of that coast and, in 1790, completed the first American circumnavigation of the world. Perhaps his most remembered accomplishment from his explorations was his coming upon and then naming of the Columbia River, in 1792 while on his second voyage.

Gray's earlier and later life are both comparatively obscure. He was born in Tiverton, Rhode Island, and may have served in the Continental Navy during the American Revolutionary War. After his two famous voyages, he carried on his career as a sea-captain, mainly of merchantmen in the Atlantic. This included what was meant to be a third voyage to the Northwest Coast, but was ended by the capture of his ship by French privateers, during the Franco-American Quasi-War, and command of an American privateer later in that same conflict. Gray died at sea in 1806, near Charleston, South Carolina,[1] possibly of yellow fever.[2] Many geographic features along the Oregon and Washington coasts bear Gray's name, as do numerous schools in the region.

Robert Gray was born in Tiverton, Rhode Island, on May 10, 1755, to William Gray.[3][4] Little is known of his early life. It is said, but not documented, that he served in the Continental Navy during the American Revolutionary War. He is known, however, to have served in the Triangular trade of South Carolina, aboard the Pacific.[citation needed]

In 1788 Gray had attempted to enter a large river, but was unable to due to the tides, this river being the Columbia River.[1] At the outset of the voyage, Gray captained the Lady Washington and Kendrick captained the Columbia Rediviva, but the captains swapped vessels during the voyage, putting Gray in command of the Columbia.[1] After the switch, Kendrick stayed on the North American coast trading for pelts and furs, while Gray sailed their existing cargo of pelts to China, stopping off at the Sandwich Islands en route.[1] Gray arrived in Canton in early 1790 and traded his cargo for large amounts of tea.[1][3] Gray then continued on west, sailing through the Indian Ocean, around the Cape of Good Hope, and across the Atlantic, arriving back in Boston on August 9, 1790.[11] As such, the Columbiabecame the first American vessel to circumnavigate the globe.[1] Although the commercial venture was disappointing, Gray was paraded through Boston for the circumnavigation accomplishment.[12] Accompanying Gray was a Hawaiian native, dressed in traditional Hawaiian dress, who had taken passage on the Columbia.[12] Gray then attended a reception held in his honor by governor John Hancock.[12]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marina Zurkow
Scoop.it!

Charters, Stephen. "Marketing terroir: A conceptual approach." Proceedings of the 5th International Academy of Wine Business Research Conference. 2010.

argues that terroir is a term with many meanings; one being that terroir usues wine to market a place - place is mor eimportant than vines or grape

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marina Zurkow
Scoop.it!

Talk Dirt to Me - New York Times

Talk Dirt to Me - New York Times | TerroirOR | Scoop.it

the effects of a place on a wine are far more complex than simply tasting the earth beneath the vine. Great wines are produced on many different soil types, from limestone to granite to clay, in places where the vines get just enough water and nourishment from the soil to grow without deficiencies and where the climate allows the grapes to ripen slowly but fully. It’s also true that different soils can elicit different flavors from the same grape. Researchers in Spain recently compared wines from the same clone of grenache grafted on the same rootstock, harvested and vinified in exactly the same way, but grown in two vineyards 1,600 feet apart, one with a soil significantly richer in potassium, calcium and nitrogen. The wines from the mineral-rich soil were higher in apparent density, alcohol and ripe-raisiny aromas; wines from the poorer soil were higher in acid, astringency and applelike aromas. The different soils produced different flavors, but they were flavors of fruit and of the yeast fermentation. What about the flavors of soil and granite and limestone that wine experts describe as minerality — a term oddly missing from most formal treatises on wine flavor? Do they really go straight from the earth to the wine to the discerning palate?

No.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marina Zurkow
Scoop.it!

Vive le Terroir

Vive le Terroir | TerroirOR | Scoop.it
Terroir, the cultivation of a region’s particular products, is an idea even more important now to a France that fears losing its identity in a larger Europe and a more competitive world.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marina Zurkow
Scoop.it!

Columbia River: Description, Creation, and Discovery

Columbia River: Description, Creation, and Discovery | TerroirOR | Scoop.it
Marina Zurkow's insight:

The Columbia itself was the work of Coyote in most oral traditions. Realizing that salmon were in the ocean and that people in the interior needed food, Coyote fought a battle with the giant beaver god Wishpoosh, backing him through the Cascade Mountains to the ocean and then killing him. It was the back-and-forth slashing action of the great beaver’s tale that scraped out the Columbia River Gorge and opened the channel to the sea. This made salmon available to the people. Coyote cut the beaver to pieces and distributed the pieces on the land, and they became humans. Later, Coyote tricked the five swallow sisters, who had built a dam across the river to block salmon, into leaving him alone there. While the sisters were away, he destroyed the dam, again freeing the way for salmon. The rocks of Celilo Falls were the remnants of the dam.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marina Zurkow
Scoop.it!

Robert Gray, privateer Oregon History Project

Robert Gray, privateer  Oregon History Project | TerroirOR | Scoop.it
Marina Zurkow's insight:

globalization, triangulating between the PNW, China and Boston

more...
Marina Zurkow's comment, July 22, 2013 8:30 PM
"Historian Dorothy Johansen once characterized Gray as “a hard man, strictly attentive to the ‘two-penny objects’ of his business—to get sea otter skins and invest them in China goods.” The captain’s dealings with Native peoples, especially during his second voyage, were contentious, and on several occasions — with only the slightest provocation — he ordered his crew to destroy villages and blow Indian canoes out of the water."