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WordLo: Free Online Term Extractors

WordLo: Free Online Term Extractors | Terminology Services | Scoop.it
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This page provides a set of free terminology extraction tools available online.

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The 229th edition of the Tool Box Journal - A computer journal for translation professionals

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By @Jeromobot who shares his experience about  TaaS Terminology Services & others! Thank you, Jost!

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Terminology Services (TermServ) on Twitter

Terminology Services (TermServ) on Twitter | Terminology Services | Scoop.it

Terminology services @TermServ

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Welcome to the Terminology Cloud!

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TaaS language coverage extended!

Good news for you in December: TaaS language coverage extended! Now we support 24 EU official and working languages + Russian!

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Raphaël Toussaint's curator insight, December 3, 2013 6:58 AM

Extract terminology in 24 EU languages + Russian

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TaaS Newsletter #2

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TaaS Launch, RSS in your language, CHAT follow up

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Industry-Scale Crowdsourcing of Data and Terminology, CHAT2013

Presenter: Rahzeb Choudhury (TAUS) This presentation is a part of TaaS project funded from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013), grant

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Big Data Terminology Mess Needs Cleanup

Big Data Terminology Mess Needs Cleanup | Terminology Services | Scoop.it

"Big data needs a coherent and unified vocabulary of terms -- or we can't share solutions to problems across disciplines."

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10 Things you should know about terminology extraction

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RSS feeds in EU languages - we need your support!

Dear All, 

We are reaching out to the language workers community to help grow the open database of the most up-to-date terms. We'd appreciate if you could take ±10 mins of your time to fill in the survey on RSS feeds in EU languages. 

This survey is a part of the TaaS project that addresses the need for instant access to the most recent terms and user participation in the creation, harmonisation, application, and sharing of multilingual terminological data. 

Thank you in advance for your cooperation! 

And enjoy the TaaS services at https://demo.taas-project.eu

Yours, 
TaaS team

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The VOC Terminology Engine Launched Internationally

The VOC Terminology Engine Launched Internationally | Terminology Services | Scoop.it

The VOC Terminology Engine Launched Internationally

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Welcome to the Cloud Services for Terminology Work - TaaS Beta is out!

Welcome to the Cloud Services for Terminology Work - TaaS Beta is out! | Terminology Services | Scoop.it

https://demo.taas-project.eu

 

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We provide multilingual and collaborative terminology services to: 
     Identify term candidates in your documents and extract them automatically 
     Retrieve translation candidates from various sources 
     Refine terms and their translations 
     Share your terminology with other users 
     Use your terminology in other working environment 
Language workers - technical writers, terminologists, interpreters, domain experts and others! 
Enjoy the TaaS services!

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TKE 2014 Berlin

TKE 2014 Berlin | Terminology Services | Scoop.it

The 11th international conference on Terminology and Knowledge Engineering, TKE 2014, is organised by GTW and DIN Deutsches Institut für Normung e. V. in cooperation with Inria, Coreon, Cologne University of Applied Sciences, Copenhagen Business School, Termnet and other associations and consortia, national and international organisations.


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13 features of my dream CAT tool | Gabriela Janiszewska Translite

13 features of my dream CAT tool | Gabriela Janiszewska Translite | Terminology Services | Scoop.it
Have you ever thought about what your dream Computer Assisted Translation tool would be like? Read my list of must-have features and share your opinion on the essential functions of CAT programmes.

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Terminology Services @ TCWorld and Tekom

Terminology Services @ TCWorld and Tekom | Terminology Services | Scoop.it

Join our team at TCWorld and Tekom in Wiesbaden on November 6-8 - Room 6.2! Meet you next week :)

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Research: RSS feeds in EU languages


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Your input is very valuable and will help to enrich the Terminology services cloud-based platform https://demo.taas-project.eu.

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What's the Difference between TM and a Glossary?

What's the Difference between TM and a Glossary? | Terminology Services | Scoop.it
A Translation Memory is a translation tool that is used to memorize and assist with consistently translating content, whereas a glossary is a guide for translators on how to translate specific terminology for a translation project.
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On Good Terms with Terminologists

By Barbara Inge Karsch and Jost Zetzsche

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TaaS: Terminology as a Service - Public report 2013

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During the second year of the project, the consortium reached its major milestone by launching a public Beta version on November 1, 2013.

Now the platform is publicly available for testing at
https://demo.taas-project.eu.

Eight languages are available in the first Beta version – EN, DE, FR,
IT, ES, HU, LV, and LT. During the next months, we will add 17 more languages.

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Beyond the Conventional Terminology Work, CHAT2013

Presented at the CHAT 2013 track of TCWorld/Tekom 2013 in Wiesbaden, Germany.

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Computational Terminology: Exploring Bilingual an Monolingual Term Extraction


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tcworld.info - The terminologist

tcworld.info - The terminologist | Terminology Services | Scoop.it

Terminology managers coordinate the creation and management of terminology across the organization. In some organizations technical writers or translators take up this task. However, more and more often trained specialists, namely terminologists, are being sought for this job today.


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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, November 13, 2013 1:30 AM

Terminology managers coordinate the creation and management of terminology across the organization. In some organizations technical writers or translators take up this task. However, more and more often trained specialists, namely terminologists, are being sought for this job today.

Correct and consistent terminology is a prerequisite for technical communication and knowledge transfer. Therefore, terminology is required for any texts with technical content, irrespective of whether these texts are created, consolidated, translated, interpreted or just read and understood. Even standardization cannot work without defined terminology, since technical specifications can be clear only if the functional words used are defined clearly. Over the past years, companies and organizations have come to recognize that integrated terminology management for a standard company language ensures not only quality and consistency of technical documentation and translation, but also supports the process optimization, customer support and loyalty as well as brand protection [1].

Translation and language service providers can offer high value quality products and value added services through terminology management, which form the basis for enduring collaboration between customers and service providers.

Who works with terminology?

The previous paragraphs show that terminology concerns mainly the following user groups who require knowledge about the theory of terminology, terminology work and computer aided terminology management.

Terminology users: All persons (groups) participating in technical communication and knowledge transfer. They consult terminology databases in printed or electronic form to understand or produce texts with technical content.

Terminology producers: All persons (groups) that develop, standardize and manage terminological information within their sphere of domain-specific language activity. These are primarily professionals from technical communication, translation and localization, who work on the terminology along with their primary activity. Even company employees working in product development, parts management, marketing, customer support, training or corporate communication are involved in coining and standardizing terminology. But the main producers of terminology are of course terminologists.

Terminology managers: All persons (groups) involved in planning, setting up and implementing terminology processes and computer aided terminology solutions in an organizational environment. Although they do not use and create terminological information, they are responsible for the modeling and flow of terminology processes, as well as the design, selection and provision of information technology for terminology work. Next to the terminologists themselves, this group of people also includes language technologists, computer scientists, project managers or those responsible for the quality management in the company.

It is often not possible to accurately demarcate the mentioned target groups, since specific persons or groups such as freelance translators or freelance technical writers count among the users as well as the producers and must take over the tasks of a terminology manager within their own organizational environment.

What does the job profile look like?

A more exact specification of terminology related areas of activity in companies and organizations can be found in the reference literature [2], as well as in module 6 “Berufsprofile und Anforderungen” [job profiles and requirements] [3].

Along with an entrance test that determines the individual requirement for terminology related knowledge and suggests corresponding learning units, the e-learning program ELCAT also offers individually recommended learning units for terminology for different target groups [4]. This program is oriented towards the content of terminology and developed by the Cologne University of Applied Sciences in collaboration with partners from the automotive industry and relevant software producers. The following target groups are named:

ManagementMarketingStandardizationProduct developmentTechnical documentation incl. spare parts documentationTerminologistsTranslators, language service, foreign language trainingCorporate communication

Even if different groups of people work on individual sub-tasks of the terminology process along with their actual primary activity, for many years there has been a need for experts concentrating completely and solely on terminology work and terminology management. This gave rise to the job profile of the terminologist, which is defined as follows [5]:

“Terminologists are experts in formulating, describing, managing and distributing mono- and multi-lingual terminologies. They work in all areas that are concerned with data, information, knowledge and communication. Terminology work is an interdisciplinary activity; therefore terminologists very often work with professionals from different subject fields.“

Terminologists often work in companies and organizations and are usually positioned in departments for technical documentation, translation, standards and patents, corporate communication or research and development. Terminologists also work with major language service providers to specifically support translation projects for instance or to execute terminology projects for external customers.

Challenging work is also to be found in standardization and language planning organizations, as well as in publishing houses. Terminology work is even conceivable on a freelance basis; here you would advice and train private organizations, non-profit organizations and public institutions on applying terminological methods, data and tools, and execute terminology projects for them [5].

 

What are the tasks?

The typical tasks of terminologists include:

Developing mono- or multilingual terminology databases, as well as standardizing and coining new terms or defining conceptsTerminology planning activities, such as setting up and controlling terminology workflows in companies for implementing a standard corporate language or to calculate the cost effectiveness of terminology  Preparing (electronic) terminology collections, i.e. design, implementation and operation of terminology databases, including the selection of corresponding tools and their integration in the IT landscape of the companyConsulting and training activities

Typical tools for these activities are terminology management systems, i.e. programs for managing terminology data. In addition to this, terminologists also use software for terminological analysis of existing texts (concordance programs, terminology extraction software) as well as to check the correct usage of terms in texts (terminology checker, quality assurance programs). Knowledge of programs that support technical writers and translators in their work and that must provide interfaces to terminology management is also required, i.e. content management systems, CAT tools or even machine translation systems.

What is the required knowledge?

Terminologists need specific knowledge about the science of terminology, terminology work and information technology for terminology management, to be able to work on the said tasks and activities. Excellent language competence in the native language is required, often in foreign languages as well. If terminologists are working in the area of research and teaching, additional didactic qualifications and qualifications in scientific theory are necessary.

Along with this inherent terminological and linguistic knowledge, terminologists require other knowledge and skills for their work, and these can vary in importance depending on the area of work and tasks. Next to so-called soft skills such as communication skills, power of persuasion and argumentative ability, other skills mentioned here are a systematic work approach, abstract thinking skills or “flair for detection” [3, 5]. Some of these capabilities can be trained and developed during further education and training; in many cases such qualifications can only be learnt in practice or must exist before further education and training [2].

What are the existing educational or training paths?

Many people working as terminologists today acquired the basic knowledge and skills needed for terminology work during their education. Several years ago, diploma study programs for technical writing, translation or interpretation at universities or technical colleges included terminology related study modules with theoretical and practical content. There was hardly ever an independent academic program for terminologists.

With the implementation of the Bologna recommendation, many educational institutions have developed and implemented new modular and usually graded curricula in the area of technical writing or translation and interpretation. In spite of varied concepts regarding the orientation and the training profile for bachelor and master study programs, the observed tendency is towards increasingly considering the practical requirements of the profession and integrating specific modules with terminological content in the curricula.

What is the study duration?

Often there are smaller study modules with terminological content from the areas of theory, terminology work and terminology management within the bachelor curricula that usually run for six or seven semesters, irrespective of what the study programs may be called. The masters study programs that often run for three or four semesters normally build on the corresponding bachelor programs and impart specific, advanced pragmatic and scientific knowledge in the areas of technical communication or translation, but also in related professional fields. The masters programs that are supposed to continue the tradition of the old diploma education at higher functional and scientific level have names like “Technical Communication”, Media Communication”, “International Professional Communication”, “Specialist translation” or “Translation” and include study modules with terminological content almost everywhere.

However, the offering of master study programs provided the opportunity of including comprehensive study components on terminology in one curriculum for the first time, e.g. as MA “ Specialist Translation and Terminology” or even a significantly independent study program for training towards becoming terminologists, e.g.  MA “Terminology and Language Technology”.

Where is further education and training available?

An overview of university programs (in German) with terminology study modules is offered by the German terminology portal www.termportal.de as well as by the professional associations:

www.adue-nord.de,www.astti.ch,www.aticom.de,www.bdue.de,www.tekom.de andwww.universitas.org.


Along with full time academic programs, there is a great need for terminological training. This can be obtained through day-long elementary seminars (e.g. the German DTT-Seminar “Terminologiearbeit – Grundlagen, Werkzeuge, Prozesse“ [Terminology work – basics, tools, processes]) or topic or product specific courses (e.g. SDL-Webinar “Taking Control of Terminology“) or through multiple day trainings (e.g. “International Terminology Summer School”) to longer and more comprehensive educational and qualification courses (e.g. vocational certificate course “Terminology” by ZHaW Winterthur, in German).

Often training offerings are supported by e-learning modules that are aimed at making it simpler for professionals to qualify while continuing their work routine. The simple e-learning course on terminology can be found on the German terminology portal (www.termportal.de – Was ist Terminologie?[ What is terminology?]), and the interactive and modular ELCAT terminology learning system (in German and English) oriented towards individual target groups is also mentioned. The “ECQA Certified Terminology Manager” also fulfills the practical requirement for confirmation of the terminological knowledge that has often been acquired during the daily work routine. The certification program for different levels of terminological qualifications is offered by TermNet.

Reference literature

[1]    Rat für Deutschsprachige Terminologie e.V. (2010):  Knowledge, Brands and Customer Loyalty - Terminology as a Critical Success Factor.

[2]    Drewer, Petra; Schmitz, Klaus-Dirk (2013): Terminology Management in Technical Communication – Principles, Methods, Training. In: Proceedings of the European Colloquium on Technical Communication 2012. S. 50–61. tcworld GmbH, Stuttgart.

[3]    Deutscher Terminologie Tag e.V. (2010): Best-Practices-Ordner: Terminologiearbeit.

[4]    Elcat

[5]    Rat für Deutschsprachige Terminologie e.V. (2004): Professional Profile for Terminologists.

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Guidelines for collaborative legal / administrative terminology work from LISE

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TaaS Beta Intro: Terminology as a Service

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Welcome to the Cloud Services for Terminology Work!

https://demo.taas-project.eu

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Over 2,500 English-German Glossary Links

English-German glossaries, online glossary


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Raphaël Toussaint's curator insight, October 25, 2013 3:57 AM

A truely overwhelming terminology resource!

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Survey on CAT tools: Results

Survey on CAT tools: Results | Terminology Services | Scoop.it
Recently we made a survey about CAT tools through SurveyMonkey. The survey lasted from July 24th 2013 until October 16th and participants had to answer 7 different questions about CAT tools.

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Google gives you answers, but a #terminologist gives you the answer -Interview w/ G. Huardby by @karawarburton

Google gives you answers, but a #terminologist gives you the answer -Interview w/ G. Huardby by @karawarburton | Terminology Services | Scoop.it
Interview with Gabriel Huard, Outgoing Director of the Terminology Standardization Directorate for the Government of Canada's Translation Bureau

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