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Chasing Che

Chasing Che | Temesvary Argentina | Scoop.it
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In 1952, a 24-year-old Ernesto Guevara and a friend left for Argentina to motorcycle the back roads of South American. Months later, Ernesto returned transformed. He never came back, even when he did. Patrick Symmes set off on his own little motorcycle adventure, armed with little more than a notebook and a copy of Che’s book and a few extra parts for his motorcycle. He attempted to follow Che’s journey to go where he went, experience what he experienced and do what he did. He was poorly funded for this trip. He traveled great distances, encountered many people, almost completely relying on the road and the people he came across. He had no back up plan; he just went with the flow. He experienced new customs, clapping twice when approaching someone or their house and also experiencing the generosity of complete strangers. He eventually returns a changed man, having a new outlook on life. Along his journey, Che helped many people along the way, just as many people had helped him. Che’s final resting place was Vallegrande, Che went to Vallegrande, the army followed, many tourists, and then the government was soon shammed into installing electricity.

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Che Guevaras Route

Che Guevaras Route | Temesvary Argentina | Scoop.it
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This is the route that Che Guevara had taken to find himself. He traved from Buenos Aires all the way to cuba and many other places. Along this journey he experience great poverty which deeply upset him as well as great wealth.

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GIC the Dirty War

GIC the Dirty War | Temesvary Argentina | Scoop.it
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As we know from "dirty wars" of the past, individuals who would otherwise be marginalized as sociopaths can rise to positions of considerable power in these situations. Like Julio Simon, known as Julian the Turk, one of the most notorious and brutal torturers of Argentina's dirty war, from 1976 to 1983. Simon was recently tried in Buenos Aires and sentenced to 25 years in prison for the torture of Jose Poblete and Gertrudis Hlaczik, and the selling of their 8-month-old daughter, Maria Victoria, to a military couple who knew very well where she had come from. When the country returned to fragile democracy in 1983, President Raul Alfonsin promulgated two controversial amnesty laws that allowed thousands of lower-ranking, hands-on torturers to escape prosecution. Over the years, jurists, scholars, and human-rights groups pressed for the overturn of these laws, which violate both the Argentine Constitution and international law. In June 2005, the Argentine Supreme Court nullified those laws. The first man to be tried was a former commissioner general of the Buenos Aires provincial police, Miguel Etchecolatz; Julio Simon was the second. Other trials are to come. In April 1977, Gen. Carlos Guillermo Suarez Mason ordered my kidnapping in Buenos Aires. A few days ago, this man, the cruelest leader of the dirty war, was released from prison, pardoned by President Carlos Saul Menem. Argentina had obtained his extradition from the U.S., where he had lived as a fugitive. He had been accused of 43 murders and 24 kidnappings in which the kidnapped individuals had disappeared.During those months of 1977, Colonel Ramon Camps, the most brutal torturer of the dirty war, was in charge of the torture I was subjected to during interrogations. A few days ago, he too was set free, granted a pardon by Mr. Menem. He had been accused of 214 extortionist kidnappings, 120 cases of torture, 32 homicides, 2 rapes, 2 abortions resulting from torture, 18 thefts and the kidnappings of 10 minors who disappeared. After substantiating 73 cases of torture, the judges sentenced him to 25 years. Pope Paul II once spoke of statements made by Colonel (subsequently General) Camps in the Spanish magazine Tiempo in which the latter acknowledged having eliminated 5,000 people.

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UNICEF - Argentina -

UNICEF - Argentina - | Temesvary Argentina | Scoop.it
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UNICEF deals mainly with children in need, helping with child protection, survival, education, and emergencies. For child survival, they use evidence based survival, helping with nutrition and environmental interactions. They also help with free, compulsory quality education for all children, protect them from violence, exploitation and abuse, and even mother-to-child transmission of HIV/AIDS, paediatric treatment, prevention, for all children affected by aids. They acompolish all this by using statistics and monitoring, supplies and logistics, evaluation and good practices, gender equality communication for development, research and the list goes on. Their main goal is to help all children in need, anywhere they need it, they go to great lengths to help children in need, creating partnerships, employment and structure among UNICEF.

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Che Guevaras death

Che Guevaras death | Temesvary Argentina | Scoop.it
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Che Guevaras death caused quite an upbringing. After his death, he became extremly popular. While he was very popular alive, his death brought him more fame than most could imagine. 

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The True Story of Che Guevara - The Documentary - YouTube

Argentinian doctor; joined Castro in Mexico in 1954; a leader of the 1956-59 Cuban Revolution. Che served as president of Cuba's national bank and as Cuba's ...
Brandon Temesvary's insight:

From his famous motorcycle trips to his historic role in the Cuban Revolution, Argentinean revolutionary Che Guevara is profiled in the documentary to explore the life of the man whose visage has become an iconic symbol of hard left politics.This man, who ordered the execution of countless human beings while in charge of the notorious La Cabaña prison in Havana, who terrorized Cuban society and who denied freedom to thousands of citizens whom he considered "deviants" or "anti-revolutionaries" can never be accepted as a hero, martyr or a saint.The documentary is good because it shows us what the other people are like during the time, the other people in the revolution. Jon Anderson is interviewed many times, also there are interviews with American soldiers who fought in the revolution,which is very interesting to get to see them. Overall it is one of the better documentaries.

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The Dirty War

The Dirty War | Temesvary Argentina | Scoop.it
Brandon Temesvary's insight:

This is one of the many rebelious movements that Che was involved in. He also organized many himself. He often times lead the movements of rebelion, especially durring the Dirty War. Che Guevara moved up through the ranks quickly.

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Che Apparel

Che Apparel | Temesvary Argentina | Scoop.it
Brandon Temesvary's insight:

Che soon became an icon for many, especially after his death. People bough Che t-shirts, che coffee mugs, che everything and anything. His pose shown above is his usual pose, this was the image often shown on anything to do with Che, everyone recognizes that this is Che.

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GIC Argentina

GIC Argentina | Temesvary Argentina | Scoop.it
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Argentines have always prided themselves as the most civilized Latin Americans. Between 1976 and 1983, tens of thousands of Argentines were murdered or "disappeared" under a brutal military dictatorship. Some of the survivors of the infamous Dirty War call themselves the "devastated generation." Now balding, graying and well into their 50s, some members of Argentina's Dirty War generation occupy positions of power in the left-of-center Kirchner administration. Many retired war veterans were jailed for infringing against human rights. In Kirchner's view, these moves are aimed at healing the old wounds of the Dirty War. But some right-wing critics and political opponents argue they're having the opposite effect, exposing again the country's thoroughly polarized culture. In their view, the 54-year-old Kirchner's emphasis on justice smacks of setentismo--a political buzzword meaning "seventyism," as in the 1970s.

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Remembering Ernesto Che Guevara

Remembering Ernesto Che Guevara | Temesvary Argentina | Scoop.it
Brandon Temesvary's insight:

This article "Remembering Ernesto Che Guevara" goes through his life once he became popular. It all started out on October 9th, which marked the fortieth anniversary of the Killing by the American CIA and the puppet army of Bolivia, of Ernesto Che Guevara. Che got his name because that is what he was popularly called. Che is one of the truly iconic figures of the twentieth century. He was born on June 14th, 1928 in the city of Rosario in Argentine. Che battles health problems all his life, the first major one was his asthma. He studied to become a medical doctor to try and fix himself. His final year involved him riding a motorcycle across Latin American, during the ride he noticed all the poverty. Che later went into exile in Mexico where he met Fidel and Raul Castro, who at the time were ogranising their military project to invade Cuba to remove Fulgencio Baptista. Che joined and fought at the head of the column. He became one of the leaders of the Cuban revolution holding positions as the Head of the National bank, minister of industries and a leader of the cuban communist party and the revolutionary Armed Forces. He was a man of action, He resigned all his positions in Cuba and went into Africa to train fighters to participate in the African Revolution. Once Che left Africa, he instituted guerrilla war in Bolivia. On October 8th 1967, his guerrilla column was cornered in the yura ravine. Che was one of many who was wounded and taken prisoner. The Bolivian government ordered the execution of Che Guevara the following day on October 9th, 1967. Due to Che being executed, his killers created a martyr whose name became an emblem of the struggle against injustice around the world.

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