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Teacher Education for Languages with Technology / Formation des enseignants de langue avec les TICE
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Lesson Idea: Taboo

Lesson Idea: Taboo | TELT | Scoop.it
Taboo has always been one of my favourite warmers. Of all the language learning games I’ve used, this particular one has really stood the test of time in my teaching.
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I like this game for EFL too

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Vocabulary Activities

Vocabulary Activities | TELT | Scoop.it

We all have our go-to activities – those activities that we have found to be effective for our context, students, and style. I’d like to share a few of my favorite ways to teach vocabulary.

 

 

Shona Whyte's insight:

Lots of activities, resources, and links for vocabulary teaching

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Have you ever played Pictureka?

Have you ever played Pictureka? | TELT | Scoop.it
If you haven't, watch the video to find out how to play it :) Pictureka is fun. It's a visual-based game. We roll the dice, read the mission and you have a certain amount of seconds to find the pic...
Shona Whyte's insight:

Nice example of game for young learners.  What I like is that preparing for the game is as much a learning opportunity as playing it - perhaps more so.

 

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Teaching and learning vocabulary: implications from acquisition research

Teaching and learning vocabulary: implications from acquisition research | TELT | Scoop.it

To me, these findings support an intermediate position between the “let it all hang out” of strongly communicative approaches, for example, and the “drill and kill” of more closely teacher-controlled methods such as grammar-translation.  To learn new words, some kind of grunt work is required, but it needs to come from their learners rather than imposed top-down by teachers. And it needs to be done intelligently.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Recent post on vocabulary learning and teaching.

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Vocabulary learning: what the research says

Vocabulary learning: what the research says | TELT | Scoop.it
I’ve just read Peter Yongqi Gu (2003)Vocabulary Learning in a Second Language: Person, Task, Context and Strategies Here are a few interesting points which emerge. All references can be found at th...
Shona Whyte's insight:

Old-fashioned dictionary work, memorisation of translation pairs still have their place, research shows.  But other activities (and more research) are needed to go beyond word recognition to appropriate use.

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Shona Whyte's curator insight, February 23, 2015 4:04 AM

How to learn more words so you can understand them, but also use them ...

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Learner-centred EFL with young German learners | VISIR

Learner-centred EFL with young German learners | VISIR | TELT | Scoop.it

Students explore and evaluate independently the improvement of their own learning via the use of digital media in concrete learning settings. This project is realised within the framework of “Karlsruhe – Stadt der jungen Forscher” (Karlsruhe – City of young researchers) an initiative of the Körber-Stiftung, Deutsche Telekom and Robert Bosch Stiftung.


At the beginning of the project the students identified problems regarding their learning processes and developed ideas how those problems could be solved through the use of digital media. 3 concrete scenarios were developed for testing.

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Oxford Text Checker | Oxford Advanced Learners Dictionary

Oxford Text Checker | Oxford Advanced Learners Dictionary | TELT | Scoop.it
Oxford Text Checker at OxfordLearnersDictionaries.com. The Oxford Text Checker will check the vocabulary in any text against the Oxford 3000 word list. See more at oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com.
Shona Whyte's insight:

Paste your text in the box and find out what percentage of the words belong to the "Oxford 3000" suggested as the most useful for learners. 75% means your text is advanced, 90% upper intermediate, and 100% makes it lower intermediate (or below, I assume).

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How I developed an academic vocabulary syllabus (part one)

How I developed an academic vocabulary syllabus (part one) | TELT | Scoop.it
This is the first of two posts describing the initial and continuing development of an academic vocabulary syllabus. This post has been some five or six years in the making, give or take a few mont...
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A very detailed and copiously illustrated post by Adam Simpson describing the development of a vocabulary programme for EFL learners.  References to research in vocabulary (Nation) and corpus tools.

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Preferred Vocabulary Self-Collection Strategies of EAP Reading Students: Randy Rebman

Preferred Vocabulary Self-Collection Strategies of EAP Reading Students: Randy Rebman | TELT | Scoop.it

Slides and handout from at TESOL 2013 presentation discussing an action research project looking at vocabulary learning techniques with EAP students.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Other posts on vocabulary from learner, teacher and researcher perspectives: http://www.scoop.it/t/telt?q=vocabulary

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Corpus project: online tutorial

Corpus project: online tutorial | TELT | Scoop.it

Laura Korhonen, Ilona Laakkonen, Britta Schneider, Richard Van Camp

 

Learn to use a corpus interface from the Brigham Young University. You can use either the British National Corpus (BNC) or the Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA).

 

This section will familiarise you with a language corpus that supports refined search options and provides data that is specific and more reliable.

 

You can return to this material for tips and advice, when willing to use the corpus as a tool for revising your own piece of text or for exploring the English language.

 

 

1. Corpus basics

 

2. Simple searches

 

3. Words that fit together: collocations

 

4. Building your vocabulary: word families

 

5. The appropriate language: mind the register

 

Time estimate: 3 hours

Self-access log

Shona Whyte's insight:

I guess this has been out there since 2007; I found it on ELT blog maintained by Mura Nava, who has pedagogical applications for corpora here http://eflnotes.wordpress.com/tag/cupofcoca/

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Some user-friendly concordance ideas

Some user-friendly concordance ideas | TELT | Scoop.it
Although corpora are now widely used in putting together ELT Dictionaries, and increasingly used in writing ELT materials, it is still rare, I think, for corpora, and especially for concordances to...
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Shona Whyte's curator insight, March 6, 2013 5:38 PM

Nice post on using corpora for ELT without being a corpus linguist or a tech whiz.

Stanislav Okhvat's curator insight, April 13, 2013 12:09 AM

A nice introduction to corpora and concordance tools and how they are useful in teaching languages and, by extension, translation.

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EasyDefine - Define multiple words quickly

EasyDefine - Define multiple words quickly | TELT | Scoop.it
Look up multiple words quickly. Simply copy and paste a list with any delimeter. Definitions/synonyms are immediately available for viewing, emailing, or downloading.
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nicolaperry's curator insight, February 18, 2013 10:28 PM

I tried a quick random list of words and the definitions seemed pretty good but not for lower level learners. I couldn't find any information about which dictionary they have used. 

 

It's quick, though, so could be useful in class for instant results and to use for word games. 

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Quick and dirty vocabulary gapfill: Olya Sergeeva

Quick and dirty vocabulary gapfill: Olya Sergeeva | TELT | Scoop.it

"Apparently, just 12 lexical verbs (say, get, go, know, think, see, make, come, take, want, give, and mean) account for 45% of lexical verbs used in conversation. Biber and Reppern suggest that, since they are so frequently used in speech, these verbs require more attention in class than they currently do, judging by the coursebooks that they reviewed, and that they should be used more to exemplify various grammar structures.

 

I’m thinking of giving the students an occasional gap-fill exercise based on the reading and listening texts that we are working on, with these verbs gapped out. Finding and replacing the various forms of these verbs could be time-consuming, but there’s a free nifty little text editor called Notepad++ in which one can make such a gap-fill exercise in one click.

 

 

Shona Whyte's insight:

This is clever.

 

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Dealing with Vocabulary in Class : Nation 2013

Lecturer : Paul Nation
Paul Nation is emeritus professor of Applied Linguistics at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. His special interests are language teaching, and methodology and vocabulary learning.

Abstract:
Ten different ways of dealing with words encountered in intensive reading and in other class work are examined.

 

 

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Compleat Lexical Tutor

A complete website for learning and learning about English and French words. You can test your vocabulary level, then work on the words at the level where you are weak. Use wordlists, online concordancer and dictionary, texts, and a database to store your work and view the work of others. French parallel site is almost complete.

 

Instructions for learners:

 

Lexical Tutor > Tutorial Guide (Original - about 2005 but still relevant)

You can use this site to expand your English vocabulary systematically (and your French vocabulary too). The site has a set of diagnostic vocabulary tests, and a corresponding set of vocabulary lists linked to concordance, dictionary, and quizzes to help you explore the nuances of form, meaning, and collocation of the words on these lists. Here's one way to proceed:

- Test yourself to determine your next zone of vocabulary growth. Start with either the Classic (GSL+UWL) or BNC (1-14k) word recognition tests (GSL=General Service List; UWL=University Word List; BNC = British National Corpus).
- Go to the Learn from Lists pages and find the level which you are weak on either the same scheme you chose for your test.
 Work your way through the list with the aid of the dictionary and concordance. Develop an approach that suits you--make notes, cut and paste examples and definitions to the Group Lex Database provided, or a spreadsheet on your own computer. Also, a set of progress tests is linked to the the 2000 and UWL lists at roughly 250-word intervals.

- If you do not like learning from lists, or want to learn more about new words by meeting them in other contexts, then you can paste complete authentic texts into VP Cloze, which will make you exercises for words from the frequency band you are working on.

- Or, if you want to work outside the frequency framework altogether, but not entirely independently, then you can read a novel  (Jack London's Call of the Wild or de Maupassant's Boule de Suif) with full click-on lexical support.  - or make your own resource-supported texts at Hypertext Builder


The 1000, 2000, and University/Academic Word Lists contain words you need to know - read the research page to learn why.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Grading first year student translations and looking for places to send them to learn vocabulary

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Involvement Load Hypothesis: Hulstijn & Laufer 2001

According to the ILH, tasks with a higher involvement load are considered to be more effective for word learning and retention than tasks with lower involvement loads. For comparison purposes, each task is assigned a specific number which relates to an involvement load index. Total absence of a factor is assigned 0, a moderate presence is assigned 1 and strong presence is assigned a score of 2.

NEED
(0) Absent: Learner doesn’t need to understand or produce word.
(1) Moderate: Learner is required to learn the word by external source (teacher).
(2) Strong: Learner makes decision to learn or produce the word.

 

SEARCH
(0) Absent: Meaning or translation of word is provided.
(1) Present: Learner must look up meaning / translation of a word.

 

EVALUATION
(0) Absent: Words are not compared with other words.
(1) Moderate: Words are compared to other words in provided contexts.
(2) Strong: Words are compared to other words in self-created contexts.

 

For example, if a teacher provides students with some new words and their definitions and asks students to create original sentences with them, the task would be assigned the following involvement load score:
Need: Moderate, (1): the assignment is imposed by the teacher.
Search: Absent (0): the definitions are provided.
Evaluation: (2) High: the students need to write their own original sentences.
Total Score: 3

 

The results of the test found that retention of the new vocabulary directly correlated with involvement load. Participants who had completed tasks with the lowest involvement load scored lowest and those who had completed tasks with the highest involvement load scored highest. This provides evidence in support of the ILH.

Shona Whyte's insight:

From Geoff Jordan and Dan Brown: research supporting engaging learners to improve vocabulary learning.

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Etymological fallacy: Humble Pie

Etymological fallacy: Humble Pie | TELT | Scoop.it

Russell Mayne: "the only language constant is language change"

Shona Whyte's insight:

The position of the minority curmudgeon tenaciously clinging to historical meanings while the rest of the world accepts new usage remind me of a gardner in our village, who claimed his neighbour always did everything wrong in tending her vegetables but consistently produced better crops than he did :-)

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Vocabulary learning in pair versus small group work: Fernández Dobao, 2014

Learners working in groups of four produced more lexical LREs [Language Related Episodes, i.e., discussions of vocabulary] than those workings in pairs and were also significantly more successful at solving them.

 

The qualitative analysis of the LREs showed that groups were more likely to achieve a correct solution to their problems because they shared more lexical knowledge, since up to four different learners could pool their individual knowledge and resources to solve each problem.

 

Although a larger number of participants represents more resources, it also means fewer opportunities to speak. […] LREs were relatively often solved by two or three of the members of the group while the others participated as observers. However, this did not have a significant impact on learners’ rate of retention of the lexical knowledge co-constructed in the LRE […O]n average, learners working in small groups were as likely to retain the lexical items discussed in their interaction as those working in pairs.

 

Since groups produced significantly more lexical LREs than pairs and, in particular, more correctly resolved LREs, this means that overall small group interaction resulted in more instances of L2 vocabulary learning than pair interaction. 

Shona Whyte's insight:

Very interesting, carefully controlled large-scale study of US undergraduate anglophone learners of Spanish with a (rare) practical implication for the second language classroom: prefer small group work over group work because pooled resources lead to more learning for all.  [Thanks to the author for sharing]

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Online strategy instruction: Ranalli, 2013

Shona Whyte's insight:

Discussion "This study investigated the efficacy of a prototype online SI course designed to teach tertiary-level ESL learners the integrated knowledge and skills needed to address a specific vocabulary usage task involving pedagogical dictionaries. Following the intervention, SI group participants displayed significant improvements in their ability to select the correct dictionary for the task, and to exploit that dictionary in both identifying and correcting errors involving lexical patterns, as illustrated in a pair of video excerpts (see video link 4). In addition, most participants reported that they found the online materials interesting, useful and appropriately challenging, felt their vocabulary knowledge and dictionary skills had benefitted from them, and believed they should be integrated into the ESL curriculum. Together, the findings provide evidence of the potential for some aspects of L2 strategy instruction to be delivered in an 

automated, online form."

 

Open access online article includes video excerpts from online tutoring system.

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Baby Steps To Corpora: Sarah Wildsmith

Sarah Wildsmith gives an introduction to using corpora in the classroom. An IH London TD session given on 12 March 2013.

Via Jersus Colmenares, Pascual Pérez-Paredes
Shona Whyte's insight:

5 steps to getting started with corpora for EFL.

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Pascual Pérez-Paredes's curator insight, June 7, 2013 1:03 AM

Interesting for novice language teachers. Sound quality is not that good, though.

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TECHY TOOLS FOR SCHOOLS & EFL: WORDSIFT

TECHY TOOLS FOR SCHOOLS & EFL: WORDSIFT | TELT | Scoop.it

Quick and dirty way into a text for EFL reading.  Paste in your text and see a word cloud, images, and a visual thesaurus.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Lots of applications, from quick real-time introductory activity, to unplanned online check-up, to more structured learner assignments for presentations and so on.

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Corpus project links: EFL vocabulary, writing and more

Corpora interfaces

VIEW: Variation in English Words and Phrases (online) http://view.byu.edu/MICASE: The Michigan Corpus of Academic Spoken English (online) http://micase.umdl.umich.edu/m/micase/ ;

 

Using Google as a corpus

http://www.hltmag.co.uk/may00/idea.htmhttp://www-writing.berkeley.edu/tesl-ej/ej26/int.html

 

Corpus exercises

http://web.quick.cz/jaedth/Introduction%20%to20CCS.htmhttp://learningresources.eli.ubc.ca/corpus/links/lab.pdfhttp://learningresources.eli.ubc.ca/corpus/links/lab1.pdf

 

Learner errors

http://elex.amu.edu.pl/~przemka/concord2adv/errors.htmhttp://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/my-english.html


Word families

http://www.uefap.com/vocab/build/building.htm

Phrasal verbs

 

http://eslcafe.com/pvhttp://englishpage.com/prepositions/phrasaldictionary.html

 

Presentation skills

http://www.see.ed.ac.uk/~gerard/Management/art1.html

 

Transitional devices

http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/transitions.htm

 

Academic writing and register

http://elc.polyu.edu.hk/cill/eap/academicstyle.htmhttp://www.roehampton.ac.uk/learningdev/writing_for_ac/register.asphttp://www.uefap.com/materials/matfram.htmhttp://owl.english.purdue.edu/

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Teaching vocabulary: Jeanne McCarten 2007 (PDF)


Via Jersus Colmenares
Shona Whyte's insight:

An overview of what corpus studies can tell us about how words are used, and then discussion of what can and should be taught regarding vocabulary.

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Create An Interactive, Label-Based Image Quiz!

Create An Interactive, Label-Based Image Quiz! | TELT | Scoop.it
Thanks to Larry Ferlazzo for sharing this resource! ImageQuiz is a fantastic new website that lets users create image-based quizzes with ease. Just upload your image, choose a title, and begin tagg...

Via Todoele
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Ramon Pavia's curator insight, October 8, 2013 4:44 AM

Upsss! Another digital toy. Seems to be use useful for proactive techno-teachers

Armando's curator insight, January 9, 2015 9:16 AM

Create An Interactive, Label-Based Image Quiz!

Lori Wilk's curator insight, January 11, 2015 7:29 AM

This is one of the coolest resources. I already have a project that I want to use it with that I will be #teaching . So many #teachers and #speakers will love this.