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Teacher Education for Languages with Technology / Formation des enseignants de langue avec les TICE
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How to pronounce feather in English - Forvo

How to pronounce feather in English - Forvo | TELT | Scoop.it
How to pronounce feather in English. The definition of feather is: the light horny waterproof structure forming the external coverin
Shona Whyte's insight:
Haven't checked this for a while: seems like a nice resource if you have doubts about the pronunciation of a particular word. I checked random words in French and English and found a range of nativelike pronunciation. Very easy to search and listen.
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Debating: a task-based model

Debating: a task-based model | TELT | Scoop.it
I told the students I needed a good way of assessment that would be based on the skills they needed to learn. I gave my students several choices, and various permutations of those choices:
Presentations 
Primary data (student-conducted research)
Speaking Tests
Other
I let them talk in groups for a few minutes in order to figure out what everything meant. I also gave them this time to ask clarifying questions. Then, I told them I was leaving for five minutes and by the time I get back, they should have figured out what they want to do.

I left. I came back five-minutes later. They had decided on something unexpected: a debate.
Shona Whyte's insight:
This ELT blog post is framed as an illustration of the value of allowing learner choice in assessment for a speaking/oral interaction class. It's interesting to me in terms of how the teacher balanced task demands and task support, then researched teaching materials and designed and implemented intermediary activities to capitalise on the learning opportunities afforded by this initial choice.

Too often teachers think learner choice means "anything goes," then go back to teacher-directed activities when students prove unable to follow through on their initial ideas and their learning is compromised. In this example, we see how the teacher works with a somewhat random learner choice to provide structure and sense to create a project which is meaningful to the class both for language learning and in terms of developing broader communicative competence.
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audioBoom

audioBoom | TELT | Scoop.it
15 December 2015 What is audioBoom? audioBoom is an app that allows you to record and broadcast your own spoken-word recordings and podcasts for free, making it one of the most popular audio apps with audio bloggers, journalists, teachers, and podcasters.  audioBoom also has a huge library of professional and educational audio content for you…
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Nice overview of what this tool can do and how to make the most of it in (language) education

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Articulatory setting: an approach to pronunciation teaching

Articulatory setting: an approach to pronunciation teaching | TELT | Scoop.it
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A short introduction to articulatory setting or voice setting, and some links to background reading, research, and pedagogical applications.

 

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Getting students to TEACH, not to PRESENT!

Getting students to TEACH, not to PRESENT! | TELT | Scoop.it

Getting students to research and then present their findings to the class can be done in a number of ways. However, consider ditching the word ‘presentation’ in favour of ̵…

Shona Whyte's insight:

This is a good way of putting it to try and avoid death by powerpoint.

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This is really the way to learn!

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Lesson Idea: Taboo

Lesson Idea: Taboo | TELT | Scoop.it
Taboo has always been one of my favourite warmers. Of all the language learning games I’ve used, this particular one has really stood the test of time in my teaching.
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I like this game for EFL too

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Audio Diaries: feedback via SoundCloud

Audio Diaries: feedback via SoundCloud | TELT | Scoop.it

The concept of Audio Diaries is actually quite simple. Students record something (on or off topic, with or without using target vocabulary or language structures). Students are then given feedback on their grammatical, lexical, and phonological errors. Finally, students re-record the same exact monologue, but this time, they must address their errors. In this way, students are getting delayed corrective feedback and forced uptake of feedback, in addition to raising their noticing and metacognitive skills. They are also getting individual attention, targeted practice in their “weak” areas, and more opportunities for speaking without the pressures of speaking in class.

Aside form typical complaints about too much homework, students seem to enjoy Audio Diaries. They enjoy the feedback and being able to have another chance to express their thoughts in a clearer way. In addition, by listening more closely to individuals I am better able to pinpoint and help them with their weaknesses in and out of class. Likewise, I am better able to notice persistent and common patterns and address them in class.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Some background on the role of feedback on learning, links to technical information, and some action research on regular audio recording for accuracy in oral production.

 

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Academic speaking: persuasive techniques from Patrick Andrews

Teaching on a course for teachers from universities in China, I found quite a lot of interest in teaching persuasion.  Here are some materials that I have developed on the area, making use of a TED talk.

There are also elements of developing critical analysis in that the learners are encouraged to think of the extent to which some of the claims are justified and the extent to which the speaker is trying to manipulate the listener.

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He's also running a MOOC, but it's nearly over, I guess.

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Sharalike: Audio Slideshow

Summarizing the highlights of an event, summarizing the key points in a story, and summarizing the results of research project are all common purposes for creating audio slideshows.
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Tutorial for video presentations

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Effects of pedagogic intervention on development of speech fluency: Tavakoli et al. 2015

Effects of pedagogic intervention on development of speech fluency: Tavakoli et al. 2015 | TELT | Scoop.it

This study measured the fluency of learner speech before and after a 4-week intensive English course at a British university. The experimental group received awareness-raising activities, strategy training, and fluency practice, while the control group received more general listening/speaking instruction. On 4 of 9 fluency measures, the experimental group outperformed the control group; speech rate showed the largest advantage, but articulation rate, mean length of run and of pause were also significantly better. (The study also measured accuracy and complexity, but found no difference on 3 of 4 measures, and a slight advantage to the control group on verb accuracy.)

 

The authors suggest that

"providing effective instruction and creating opportunities for practice facilitated the process of proceduralisation of learner interlanguage, which might have contributed to the learners’ preparedness for developing a degree of automatisation in their performance (DeKeyser, 2001, 2007; Segalowitz, 2010)" (p. 17)

 

They conclude that

"a key finding of the current study is that, although the classroom context often provides limited and insufficient opportunities for L2 practice, tailor-made training aimed at improving fluency can have short-term positive effects" (p. 20)

 

Shona Whyte's insight:

This is an interesting finding from what looks like well-designed and controlled research, using fewer than 40 learners but in an ecologically valid study and including a range of measures of fluency, accuracy and complexity.  While explanation of the findings in terms of second language theory goes beyond the scope of the paper, the teaching implications are encouraging.  

 

Of interest to language teachers are the following:

 

1. Activities to raise awareness of different aspects of fluency. Students listened to a nonnative speaker of English retelling a picture story and evaluated the speaker’s fluency in terms of speed, pausing, and repair measures. Students examined the transcript of the picture story retelling and identified where fluency had broken down.

2. Strategies that can be used for improving fluency. Using lexical fillers (e.g., well) and longer lexical chunks (e.g., let me think) and practising them in conversations. Avoiding repetitions and hesi- tations in conversations when possible.

3. Opportunities for practising fluency. In class: Retelling the picture story that they had listened to in exercise 1. At home: Retelling another picture story and recording their performance, listening

to their own performance to identify fluency problems, and recording their performance of the same task again.


(Ahead of print free access for now.)

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Two New Apps That Are Great for Recording Audio Interviews

Two New Apps That Are Great for Recording Audio Interviews | TELT | Scoop.it
This week I tested two new apps for recording audio interviews. Both of these apps can be used by students without creating any kind of new online accounts. Neither one is entirely perfect, but they're both quite good.
Shona Whyte's insight:

Opinion and Story app. Why not?

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Dara Oken's curator insight, April 1, 2015 10:40 PM

Could be great for pronunciation assessment purposes.

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Learning your lines: using dialogues for speaking practice

Learning your lines: using dialogues for speaking practice | TELT | Scoop.it

Kevin Stein on helping learners to work with coursebook dialogues.

 

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Creative, practical solutions to the problem of making this kind of speaking exercise come alive in the language classroom.

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EFL teaching with video via Jamie Keddie

EFL teaching with video via Jamie Keddie | TELT | Scoop.it
This talk was by Jamie Keddie who's the author of Images (OUP, 2009) and Bringing Online Video into the Classroom (OUP, 2014). He is also the founder of two sites: Videotelling and Lessonstream.  J...
Shona Whyte's insight:

Links and reaction by blogger Adi Rajan to talk and resources on use of video for language teaching from British Council teacher Jamie Keddie.  I noticed a shift in ELT a while back from comprehension of language resources to production, mirroring the Web 1.0 to 2.0 move and encouraging more active and open-ended contributions from learners

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Tips and techniques for correcting spoken errors: Rachael Roberts

Tips and techniques for correcting spoken errors: Rachael Roberts | TELT | Scoop.it
Hand signals to prompt self-correction in speaking
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Share your insight
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The Big List of Class Discussion Strategies

The Big List of Class Discussion Strategies | TELT | Scoop.it
Here they are: 15 formats for structuring a class discussion to make it more engaging, more organized, more equitable, and more academically challenging.
Shona Whyte's insight:

Different formats and activities to encourage discussion in class

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Arizona State University, Claire McLaughlin's curator insight, February 5, 2016 10:15 AM

Are you tired of the same few students answering discussion questions?  Or having the class go completely silent when discussion time begins?  If yes, this article has a variety here to get students discussing.  I love how this article breaks it down the prep time from easy to difficult.  

Veronica Newton's curator insight, February 6, 2016 1:09 PM

"15 formats for structuring a class discussion to make it more engaging, more organized, more equitable, and more academically challenging. If you’ve struggled to find effective ways to develop students’ speaking and listening skills, this is your lucky day."

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Concepts for Teaching Speaking in the English Language Classroom | Burns | LEARN Journal: Language Education and Acquisition Research Network

Concepts for Teaching Speaking in the English Language Classroom


Via Phil Chappell
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Burns says not do "do" speaking but "teach" speaking, and provides reasons and examples

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Phil Chappell's curator insight, January 22, 2016 7:07 PM
Abstract Systematically and explicitly addressing the teaching of speaking is an aspect of English language teaching that is often underestimated. While teachers may be presenting various speaking activities in the classroom, such activities may amount to ‘doing speaking’ rather than ‘teaching speaking’. In this article, I argue that being a competent teacher of speaking involves understanding the ‘combinatorial’ nature of speaking, which includes the linguistic and discoursal features of speech, the core speaking skills that enable speakers to process and produce speech, and the communication strategies for managing and maintaining spoken interactions. The article concludes by presenting a ‘teaching-speaking cycle’ (Goh and Burns, 2012) that teachers can use to plan tasks and activities that explicitly address these aspects of speaking and that scaffold student learning
Sacra Jáimez's curator insight, February 5, 2016 8:34 AM

An insightful article on how teaching speaking should be planned to help learners become more aware and autonomous in dealing with an speaking task inside the classroom or once outside in the real world.

 

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Five tips to encourage spontaneous talk

Five tips to encourage spontaneous talk | TELT | Scoop.it

1. Teach masses of vocabulary,

2. Involve students in lots of oral interaction

3. Expose learners to lots of comprehensible aural input

4. Model to students creative ways to put a message across

5. Ask them to practise digitally-mediated interactional writing independently

Shona Whyte's insight:

Going beyond the parrot stage

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