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Teacher Education for Languages with Technology / Formation des enseignants de langue avec les TICE
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Multicultural London English

Multicultural London English | TELT | Scoop.it

The speaker displays many of the features of a British accent known widely as Multicultural London English (MLE), such as producing vowels in e.g. FACE and PRICE as monophthongs, not dropping /h/ sounds (/h/-dropping is common in London accent Cockney) and pronouncing voiced dental fricatives in e.g. the as a [d].  There are glottal stops, which are less common in Afro-Caribbean or African English accents, and /l/-vocalisation. The speaker also has a more syllable-timed speech rhythm; instead of pronouncing the phrase from all walks of life as /frəm ɔːl wɔːks əv laɪf/ it sounds more like [frɒm ɔː wɔːks ɒv lɐːf], with a full vowel in each syllable.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Jane Setter on forensic phonetic analysis of MLE

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Phonetic vs phonemic inventories

Phonetic vs phonemic inventories | TELT | Scoop.it
In my first year "Sounds of Language" class, one of the things we do is look at phonetic vs phonemic inventories.
Shona Whyte's insight:

Nice clear explanation with example

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Pronunciation of English as a lingua franca

Pronunciation of English as a lingua franca | TELT | Scoop.it
Thanks to everyone who joined us in London yesterday for our seminar, the last in the 2013-14 series hosted by the British Council–and thanks also to those who watched online!
Shona Whyte's insight:

"Approximately 80% of interaction in English worldwide takes place with no native speaker present (Beneke, 1991). It is no longer realistic to assume a goal of native-like pronunciation for all learners."

 

Links to talk, slides, PDF handout with references.

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The Guess List: a study in /t/ elision

The Guess List: a study in /t/ elision | TELT | Scoop.it
The BBC is airing a new game show on Saturday nights hosted by the wonderful Rob Brydon and amusingly entitled The Guess List. You can read the Independent newspaper's less than glowing review of it here.
Shona Whyte's insight:

Discussion of "perfectly legal" elision and assimilation in connected speech, with video example from Burton/Taylor in Who's afraid of Virginia Woolf.

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Identifying and practising thought groups

Identifying and practising thought groups | TELT | Scoop.it
This is the second in a pair of posts on the theory and practice of teaching nuclear stress for English as a Lingua Franca (ELF).  The first post explained what nuclear stress is; this post will de...
Shona Whyte's insight:

A sample lesson plan with resource included.

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Buried treasure from the BBC: Pronunciation activities

Buried treasure from the BBC: Pronunciation activities | TELT | Scoop.it
I was hunting around the Aladdin's cave that is the BBC Learning English website and stumbled across these two gems - "Better speaking" and "First sight, second thoughts", which are both great reso...
Shona Whyte's insight:

A little buried criticism of the BBC site here - lots of materials/resources, but not always easy to find ...

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Phonetizer: transcribe British or US English into IPA

Phonetizer: transcribe British or US English into IPA | TELT | Scoop.it

Transcribe your text, then use a text-to-speech tool like http://www.ivona.com/en/ to hear it.

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Accents 2013: conference on accents of English

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IDEA International Dialects of English Archive: authentic clips & transcripts

IDEA International Dialects of English Archive: authentic clips & transcripts | TELT | Scoop.it

Sound archive for English as a lingua franca, searchable by continent.  Short audio recordings with transcript and speaker bio.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Recommended by Laura Patsko for pronunciation and listening activities.

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Practical ideas for teaching pronunciation and listening in an English as a lingua franca: Katy Davies & Laura Patsko

Practical ideas for teaching pronunciation and listening in an English as a lingua franca: Katy Davies & Laura Patsko | TELT | Scoop.it
Shona Whyte's insight:

Recording of British Council seminar divided into 6 short video clips on moving from native to non-native models for pronunciation in the second language classroom.  Teaching activities to diagnose problems (learner-to-learner sentence dictation), adapt coursebooks and integrate authentic materials (short clips with transcripts for marking stress and word groups).  Jennifer Jenkins references.

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A World of Englishes: Flipping phonetics

A World of Englishes: Flipping phonetics | TELT | Scoop.it

Jane Setter: "The flipped classroom basically involves presenting what would normally be lecture content via vodcasts which the students watch ahead of the class, thus allowing more time in the actual class itself for practical work. This approach works well in the sciences where a lot of practical work is needed for students to progress, and [and it is] also suitable for phonetics, which also requires a lot of rehearsal of skills and time for class discussion of issues. 

I had wanted to try this for a while as I have been becoming increasingly concerned that the growing number of students I have in my class meant that I had less time to spend with each of them and that it was difficult to support individual student needs. Thanks to a small grant from the University of Reading's "Partnerships in Learning and Teaching" (PLanT) pilot scheme, I was able to buy some software to do video capture of my desktop which enables me to record video and audio of me narrating my way through my lecture slides. I then post these on our virtual learning environment, Blackboard, for the students to view ahead of class."

Shona Whyte's insight:

Account of a university teaching experiment with links to teaching resources (vodcasts) and student reactions (and final test scores).

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Give it a go: Teaching pronunciation to adults

Shona Whyte's insight:

"This PD resource is an outcome of the research project “Language Training and Settlement Success: Are they related? (LTSS)” which was conducted as part of the Special Project Research Program 2008-2009. 

This electronic document contains some special interactive features:

Embedded audio clips you can listen to by clicking the speaker iconForm-like fields where you can enter responses to questionsThe ability to print your form responses"

 

Looks great: audio inserts, content and tips for teaching, free download. 

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Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, October 13, 2013 6:17 AM

Thank you for sharing.

Vannessa MissoVeness's curator insight, October 15, 2013 12:52 AM

Thanks! It looks comprehensive and just when I need to work on pronunciation with a student.

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How and Why you should adopt an ELF approach to Pronunciation - ELTSquared.co.uk

How and Why you should adopt an ELF approach to Pronunciation - ELTSquared.co.uk | TELT | Scoop.it
An ELTChat summary of the chat help on the 19th of June 2013: How and Why to adopt and ELF approach to Pronunciation
Shona Whyte's insight:

Interesting discussion and references to follow up if you're interested in English as a Lingua Franca (as opposed to British or American English, for example).

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The Speech Accent Archive: The English Accents of People Who Speak 341 Different Languages

The Speech Accent Archive: The English Accents of People Who Speak 341 Different Languages | TELT | Scoop.it
Over the years, I’ve met with several foreign speaking partners. Through conversation, I learn their language — Spanish, Korean, Japanese — and they learn mine — English.
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Please call Stella ...

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TED talks: beyond coursebook accents

TED talks: beyond coursebook accents | TELT | Scoop.it
Do you ever use TED talks in your classes? This nonprofit organisation, with the tagline ‘Ideas worth spreading’, is a great place to find interesting authentic audio.
Shona Whyte's insight:

Nice selection of different accents for awareness raising or teacher education

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Nedi Silveira's curator insight, September 28, 12:59 AM

Wonderful and inspiring talks.

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Intelligibility in ELF settings: Patsko & Simpson

Interview at IATEFL of elfpron bloggers Laura Patsko and Katy Simpson.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Brief introduction to teaching pronunciation to EFL/ESL learners whose target is English as a lingua franca (ELF) rather than a native speaker norm.

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Articulatory setting: Borissoff

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In a nutshell, your tongue's resting position is different for different languages, and if you get it into the correct position for the language you want to speak, everything else should fall into place ....

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Understanding nuclear stress

Understanding nuclear stress | TELT | Scoop.it
This is the first in a pair of posts (read the second post here) on the theory and practice of teaching nuclear stress for English as a Lingua Franca (ELF). This post aims to answer the following q...
Shona Whyte's insight:

Very clear presentation, why it's important even for Lingua Franca users, and references.

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Journal of Second Language Pronunciation: Benjamins

EditorJohn M. Levis | Iowa State University | JournalSLP@gmail.com

 

ISSN 2215-1931 | E-ISSN 2215-194X

 

The Journal of Second Language Pronunciation is a scholarly journal devoted to research into the acquisition, perception, production, teaching, assessment, and description of prosodic and segmental pronunciation of second languages in all contexts of learning. The journal encourages research that connects theory and practice, enhances our understanding of L2 phonological learning processes, and provides connections between L2 pronunciation and other areas of applied linguistics such as pragmatics, CALL, and speech perception. Contributions focusing on empirical research will represent all portions of the methodological spectrum including quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-methods studies. The journal invites papers on topics such as intelligibility and comprehensibility, accent, phonological acquisition, the use of technology (such as automatic speech recognition, text-to-speech, and CAPT), spoken language assessment, the social impact of L2 pronunciation, the ethics of pronunciation teaching, pronunciation acquisition in less commonly taught languages, speech perception and its relationship to speech production, and other topics.

Shona Whyte's insight:

New journal

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PEPS-C: Profiling elements of prosodic systems

PEPS-C: Profiling elements of prosodic systems | TELT | Scoop.it

A group of researchers at Queen Margaret University College (Edinburgh) have developed a way of assessing prosody using computer-based tasks.
“Profiling Elements of Prosodic Systems - Children” (PEPS-C) was developed from a procedure for assessing prosody in adults. The test is useful for assessing any individual from 5 years of age who is suspected of having an expressive and/or receptive prosodic disorder. It can be used by Speech and Language Therapists and other related professionals.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Outil développé par Sue Peppe http://www.peps-c.com/ pour l'évaluation de la production orale des apprenants de langue.

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VOICE - ELF sound archive

VOICE - ELF sound archive | TELT | Scoop.it

In the early 21st century, English in the world finds itself in an “unstable equilibrium”: On the one hand, the majority of the world's English users are not native speakers of the language, but use it as an additional language, as a convenient means for communicative interactions that cannot be conducted in their mother tongues. On the other hand, linguistic descriptions have as yet predominantly been focusing on English as it is spoken and written by its native speakers.

 

VOICE seeks to redress the balance by providing a sizeable, computer-readable corpus of English as it is spoken by this non-native speaking majority of users in different contexts. These speakers use English successfully on a daily basis all over the world, in their personal, professional or academic lives. We therefore see them primarily not as language learners but as language users in their own right. It is therefore clearly worth finding out just how they use the language. This is exactly what VOICE seeks to make possible.

 

The VOICE project as such ran from 2005 to 2013, see News

Shona Whyte's insight:

Corpus of authentic ELF audio recordings with close transcription.

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nicolaperry's curator insight, January 12, 6:29 AM

Too many learners still think they have to aim for native speaker models. Too many teachers are not aware that the standard English they teach is not the only acceptable English. These recordings were collected as part of a major research project into International English / English as a Lingua Franca (ELF). 

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Research in English as a lingua franca: Jenkins, Cogo & Dewey, 2011

Shona Whyte's insight:

Some quotes:

- "native English pronunciation is not optimum in ELF communication contexts."  

- ELF refers to "an additionally acquired language system which serves as a common means of communication for speakers of different first languages" (this definition includes native speakers of English; VOICE, Seidelhofer).  

- ELF users "are not the ‘failed native speakers’ of EFL, but – more often – highly skilled communicators who make use of their multilingual resources in ways not available to monolingual NSEs, and who are found to prioritize successful communication over narrow notions of ‘correctness’ in ways that NSEs, with their stronger attachment to their native English, may find more challenging." 

- Jenkins research showed "certain English pronunciation features (essentially consonant sounds apart from the dental fricatives /T/ and /D/, initial consonant clusters, vowel length distinctions, and nuclear stress) contributed significantly to intelligibility in the ELF interactions being studied. On the other hand, they showed that certain other features (e.g. weak forms, elisions, assimilations) did not appear to contribute to intelligibility in these interactions and may

even have detracted from it"

- call for awareness raising and action research

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Syllable structure matters: Jane Setter

Syllable structure matters: Jane Setter | TELT | Scoop.it

The thing which always surprises me - and perhaps it shouldn't - is that teachers of English from other language backgrounds often know nothing about the phonology of their own language, and so do not understand that a learner's problem with pronouncing a sound in a particular position in the syllable is unlikely to be about not being able to produce the sound per se but that the learner's language does not permit certain sounds in certain positions in the syllable. If, for example, a learner is from a Chinese language background and that language only permits a zero-coda (i.e., no consonants at the end of syllables) or only a nasal of some description in the coda, pronouncing any other consonant at the end of a syllable may be difficult, and pronouncing clusters is going to be an extreme challenge.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Accessible discussion of syllable structure for language learning/teaching.

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Pronunciation teacher: Tom Randolph

Shona Whyte's insight:

Different techniques for teaching pronunciation and addressing learners' problems in this area.

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A World of Englishes: The International Phonetic Alphabet

A World of Englishes: The International Phonetic Alphabet | TELT | Scoop.it

The current revision of the IPA chart (above) starts with a large table showing consonant sounds, or phones, made on a pulmonic egressive airstream (i.e., with air from the lungs). Place of articulation (POA) is indicated by which column a symbol is located in. The passive articulator is usually indicated, i.e., the part of the oral cavity which remains in place while the active articulator – often the tongue – moves towards it; e.g., if a sound is labelled “alveolar” it means the tongue moves towards the alveolar ridge. Manner of articulation (MOA) is indicated by row. Where voiceless and voiced pairs of consonants are given, the one on the left is voiceless. The usual way of describing a consonant is to use a VPM label, where VPM stands for “voice place manner” – so [t] is a voiceless alveolar plosive.

Shona Whyte's insight:

The IPA explained by a specialist

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