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Teacher Education for Languages with Technology / Formation des enseignants de langue avec les TICE
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The Speech Accent Archive: The English Accents of People Who Speak 341 Different Languages

The Speech Accent Archive: The English Accents of People Who Speak 341 Different Languages | TELT | Scoop.it
Over the years, I’ve met with several foreign speaking partners. Through conversation, I learn their language — Spanish, Korean, Japanese — and they learn mine — English.
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Please call Stella ...

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TED talks: beyond coursebook accents

TED talks: beyond coursebook accents | TELT | Scoop.it
Do you ever use TED talks in your classes? This nonprofit organisation, with the tagline ‘Ideas worth spreading’, is a great place to find interesting authentic audio.
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Nice selection of different accents for awareness raising or teacher education

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The Guess List: a study in /t/ elision

The Guess List: a study in /t/ elision | TELT | Scoop.it
The BBC is airing a new game show on Saturday nights hosted by the wonderful Rob Brydon and amusingly entitled The Guess List. You can read the Independent newspaper's less than glowing review of it here.
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Discussion of "perfectly legal" elision and assimilation in connected speech, with video example from Burton/Taylor in Who's afraid of Virginia Woolf.

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Understanding nuclear stress

Understanding nuclear stress | TELT | Scoop.it
This is the first in a pair of posts (read the second post here) on the theory and practice of teaching nuclear stress for English as a Lingua Franca (ELF). This post aims to answer the following q...
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Very clear presentation, why it's important even for Lingua Franca users, and references.

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Practical ideas for teaching pronunciation and listening in an English as a lingua franca: Katy Davies & Laura Patsko

Practical ideas for teaching pronunciation and listening in an English as a lingua franca: Katy Davies & Laura Patsko | TELT | Scoop.it
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Recording of British Council seminar divided into 6 short video clips on moving from native to non-native models for pronunciation in the second language classroom.  Teaching activities to diagnose problems (learner-to-learner sentence dictation), adapt coursebooks and integrate authentic materials (short clips with transcripts for marking stress and word groups).  Jennifer Jenkins references.

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A World of Englishes: Flipping phonetics

A World of Englishes: Flipping phonetics | TELT | Scoop.it

Jane Setter: "The flipped classroom basically involves presenting what would normally be lecture content via vodcasts which the students watch ahead of the class, thus allowing more time in the actual class itself for practical work. This approach works well in the sciences where a lot of practical work is needed for students to progress, and [and it is] also suitable for phonetics, which also requires a lot of rehearsal of skills and time for class discussion of issues. 

I had wanted to try this for a while as I have been becoming increasingly concerned that the growing number of students I have in my class meant that I had less time to spend with each of them and that it was difficult to support individual student needs. Thanks to a small grant from the University of Reading's "Partnerships in Learning and Teaching" (PLanT) pilot scheme, I was able to buy some software to do video capture of my desktop which enables me to record video and audio of me narrating my way through my lecture slides. I then post these on our virtual learning environment, Blackboard, for the students to view ahead of class."

Shona Whyte's insight:

Account of a university teaching experiment with links to teaching resources (vodcasts) and student reactions (and final test scores).

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English phonetics & phonology: Forel & Puskas, updated 2005

PHONETICS AND PHONOLOGYReader for First Year English Linguistics Claire-A.

Via Manos Koutsoukos
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60 page introduction to phonetics and phonology, including exercises.  For students of linguistics rather than EFL learners.

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A World of Englishes: Is /ə/ "real"?

A World of Englishes: Is /ə/ "real"? | TELT | Scoop.it
Is /ə/ "real"? "Is schwa a real phoneme?" asked a first year student, during a preliminary session preparing them for transcription in the second year. What an excellent question!
 The issue arose because I had referred them to John Wells' standard lexical sets to describe English vowel sounds more easily. This is a list of English phonemes with keywords devised by Prof Wells and given in his three-volume book Accents of English(1982). Rather than trying to explain in articulatory terms what /ʊ/ is in comparison with /ʌ/, for example, they can be referred to as the FOOT and STRUT vowels respectively, and then discussion about them appearing (or not) in various accents of English can also be facilitated.
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Interesting, accessible discussion with hyperlinks and further discussion in comments.

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Things to do with a mouthful of air: Jonathon Marks | Liverpool Online

Things to do with a mouthful of air: Jonathon Marks | Liverpool Online | TELT | Scoop.it

Nobody can speak without pronouncing. Pronunciation tends to be neglected by teachers, but learners often rate it as a high priority. In this workshop, we will do some practical recognition and production activities, taken from The Book of Pronunciation, designed to help learners with sounds and sound sequences, pronunciation and spelling, word stress, rhythm and intonation.

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Irresistible title for this hands-on workshop.  50 minute video.

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French EFL students' choice: listening, speaking & pronunciation resources

French EFL students' choice: listening, speaking & pronunciation resources | TELT | Scoop.it

LISTENING ACTIVITIES

 

http://www.esl-lab.com

Multiple choice comprehension questions on graded audio recordings of scripted dialogues, plus vocabulary and grammar exercises.

 

http://listenaminute.com

60 second recordings of scripted monologues, with gap-fill, spelling, and discussion exercises.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/

Huge range of listening (audio, video) and pronunciation (transcription) resources with learning activities.

NB: This site uses a variation on IPA (/e/ instead of /ɛ/; length markings; see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Phonetic_Alphabet_chart_for_English_dialects)

 

http://www.talkenglish.com/Listening/ListenAdvanced.aspx

Scripted dialogues with multiple choice questions and scripts.

 

http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/media/spelling-challenge-v2/

Oxford dictionaries spelling challenge: type each word you hear to see how well you can spell

 

http://www.cdlponline.org

Texts read aloud followed by vocabulary practice with audio and comprehension questions

 

http://www.simpleenglishvideos.com

Watch movie trailers with clickable transcripts allowing you to jump to a particular place in the trailer.

 

http://tinytexts.wordpress.com

Native speakers read short texts aloud, which listeners can follow onscreen or

print a PDF with a gap-fill exercise.  There are also vocabulary definitions.

 

http://www.eslradioandtv.com/

Scripted audio and video clips with optional captions and comprehension questions.

 

http://www.lyricstraining.com/

Fill in the blanks as you listen to and watch music videos.

 

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/extra/video/blog/

The US Public Broadcasting Service features a daily video news report with transcript and discussion questions.

 

EXTENSIVE LISTENING

 

http://www.webofstories.com/

Video clips under 10 minutes featuring famous and ordinary individuals interviewed on all sorts of topics.  (You also have the option of videorecording and uploading your own story.)

 

http://www.openculture.com/freeaudiobooks

Listen online or download mp3 files to hear novels chapter by chapter.  LM Montgomery's Anne of Green Gables, Paul Auster's The Red Notebook, and Dickens' Great Expectations were favourites.

 

http://audioliterate.com/

Streaming and downloadable free audiobooks

 

http://www.onlineaudiostories.com/

Fairy stories and classic books to listen to and read online or via podcast.

 

http://www.chockadoc.com/nostradamus-2012/

Over one thousand full-length documentaries in English on a variety of topics.

 

SPEAKING ACTIVITIES

 

http://www.englishcentral.com/videos#!/index

2 minute video extracts with optional subtitles, followed by vocabulary practice (type the word you hear, check native pronunciation with clickable phonetic symbols; repeat a word into your mic and get immediate feedback).  Share on Facebook.

 

 

Live audio/video chat

http://www.practicespeakingaforeignlanguage.com

http://www.twinvox.com

https://www.verbling.com (chat with native speakers)

http://livemocha.com: Live text, audio or video chat with other learners of English.  You can also record a video role-play for feedback from a native speaker (but only once without paying).

 

 

 

PHONETICS & PRONUNCIATION

 

http://www.cambridge.org/other_files/Flash_apps/Pronunciation/

The phonemic chart plus sounds, stress and intonation exercises.  

NB: This site uses a variation on IPA (/e/ instead of /ɛ/; length markings; see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Phonetic_Alphabet_chart_for_English_dialects)

 

http://pronunciationcoach.com/

Short explanations and advice for hearing and producing English sounds.

 

http://www.uiowa.edu/~acadtech/phonetics/english/frameset.html

The Sounds of American English: articulatory phonetics of vowels and consonants with animation, video and transcription

 

 

 

 

 

Shona Whyte's insight:

What university students in France choose to work on for a complementary self-study assignment in an introductory class on phonetics for pronunciation skills.

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Shona Whyte's curator insight, December 21, 2012 9:40 AM

My second year English majors found more listening than speaking activities, but some daring individuals tried out a number of free live audio/video chat sites designed for language learning.

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John Wells's phonetic blog: what's important in intonation for EFL?

John Wells's phonetic blog: what's important in intonation for EFL? | TELT | Scoop.it
Wells quotes Francis Nolan on priorities for learners:

…I will suggest that what learners need is a strategy which will optimise the pedagogical cost-benefit ratio in terms of (in order of priority) intelligibility, the avoidance of inadvertent offence, and (lowest in priority) the mastery of intonational nuances. Broadly corresponding to these three goals would be three prioritised learning targets: the mastery of accentuation (involving stress placement, rhythm, and pitch prominence achieved by a reduced inventory of pitch accents); the eradication of any L1-influenced phonetic realisations of pitch accents which might convey unintended meaning in English; and (lowest in priority) the acquisition of a more complete set of intonational pitch contrasts.
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Pronunciation Science - English pronunciation

Pronunciation Science - English pronunciation | TELT | Scoop.it

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Articles on teaching pronunciation, including a 1964 paper by Beatrice Honikman on articulatory settings that I have found particularly helpful.

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“Focus” « Tarle Speech and Language English Pronunciation Podcast

“Focus” « Tarle Speech and Language English Pronunciation Podcast | TELT | Scoop.it

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Short videos on how to pronounce particular words and sounds in English, focusing on difficult phonemes or contrasts.

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Phonetic vs phonemic inventories

Phonetic vs phonemic inventories | TELT | Scoop.it
In my first year "Sounds of Language" class, one of the things we do is look at phonetic vs phonemic inventories.
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Nice clear explanation with example

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Pronunciation of English as a lingua franca

Pronunciation of English as a lingua franca | TELT | Scoop.it
Thanks to everyone who joined us in London yesterday for our seminar, the last in the 2013-14 series hosted by the British Council–and thanks also to those who watched online!
Shona Whyte's insight:

"Approximately 80% of interaction in English worldwide takes place with no native speaker present (Beneke, 1991). It is no longer realistic to assume a goal of native-like pronunciation for all learners."

 

Links to talk, slides, PDF handout with references.

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Articulatory setting: Borissoff

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In a nutshell, your tongue's resting position is different for different languages, and if you get it into the correct position for the language you want to speak, everything else should fall into place ....

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Phonetizer: transcribe British or US English into IPA

Phonetizer: transcribe British or US English into IPA | TELT | Scoop.it

Transcribe your text, then use a text-to-speech tool like http://www.ivona.com/en/ to hear it.

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Syllable structure matters: Jane Setter

Syllable structure matters: Jane Setter | TELT | Scoop.it

The thing which always surprises me - and perhaps it shouldn't - is that teachers of English from other language backgrounds often know nothing about the phonology of their own language, and so do not understand that a learner's problem with pronouncing a sound in a particular position in the syllable is unlikely to be about not being able to produce the sound per se but that the learner's language does not permit certain sounds in certain positions in the syllable. If, for example, a learner is from a Chinese language background and that language only permits a zero-coda (i.e., no consonants at the end of syllables) or only a nasal of some description in the coda, pronouncing any other consonant at the end of a syllable may be difficult, and pronouncing clusters is going to be an extreme challenge.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Accessible discussion of syllable structure for language learning/teaching.

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Pronunciation teacher: Tom Randolph

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Different techniques for teaching pronunciation and addressing learners' problems in this area.

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A World of Englishes: The International Phonetic Alphabet

A World of Englishes: The International Phonetic Alphabet | TELT | Scoop.it

The current revision of the IPA chart (above) starts with a large table showing consonant sounds, or phones, made on a pulmonic egressive airstream (i.e., with air from the lungs). Place of articulation (POA) is indicated by which column a symbol is located in. The passive articulator is usually indicated, i.e., the part of the oral cavity which remains in place while the active articulator – often the tongue – moves towards it; e.g., if a sound is labelled “alveolar” it means the tongue moves towards the alveolar ridge. Manner of articulation (MOA) is indicated by row. Where voiceless and voiced pairs of consonants are given, the one on the left is voiceless. The usual way of describing a consonant is to use a VPM label, where VPM stands for “voice place manner” – so [t] is a voiceless alveolar plosive.

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The IPA explained by a specialist

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Résultats du sondage EPTiES (English Pronunciation Teaching in Europe Survey) : l’enseignement de la prononciation

Résultats du sondage EPTiES (English Pronunciation Teaching in Europe Survey) : l’enseignement de la prononciation | TELT | Scoop.it

Article by Dan Frost and Alice Henderson in APLIUT (open access).

 

"Les participants en France (74 % anglophones non natifs) ont évalué leur propre prononciation plutôt favorablement (4,1/5), moyenne identique à celle de la Suisse où 84 % des participants sont des anglophones natifs. Cependant, dans les entretiens, un manque d’assurance de la part des enseignants français se manifeste par rapport soit à leur propre prononciation, soit à leur façon de l’enseigner (par exemple un souci révélé dans les commentaires sur la maîtrise de l’API et/ou de diverses technologies). Une enseignante en France indique que les grands défis dans l’enseignement de la prononciation sont au nombre de deux : aider l’apprenant à améliorer sa prononciation afin de ne pas en avoir honte et rendre les locuteurs non natifs facilement compréhensibles."

Shona Whyte's insight:

Les enseignants éviteraient d'enseigner la prononciation faute de compétence 

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Evidence | Speech in Action

Evidence | Speech in Action | TELT | Scoop.it
Evidence No. 1: ‘It’s safer, but not completely safe.’

Murray Walker, the famous British motor racing commentator, once said in a radio interview: ‘When I consider Formula One racing now with what it was twenty years ago, it’s safer, but not completely safe.’ Click on the loudspeaker to hear all of the words he said, or click on a line to hear it on its own. (The voice is not Murray Walker’s, it’s Richard Cauldwell’s).

Shona Whyte's insight:

Richard Cauldwell has a lot of interesting material on this website, including a new iPad app called Cool Speech.  This page has audio examples of discourse intonation (following Brazil) to help teachers and advanced learners understand intonation patterns and particularly the role of context.

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French undergraduate EFL student recommendations: listening, speaking & phonetics

French undergraduate EFL student recommendations: listening, speaking & phonetics | TELT | Scoop.it

LISTENING

 

http://www.talkenglish.com/Listening/ListenAdvanced.aspx

Scripted dialogues with multiple choice questions and scripts.

 

http://www.cdlponline.org

Texts read aloud followed by vocabulary practice with audio and comprehension questions

 

http://www.simpleenglishvideos.com

Watch movie trailers with clickable transcripts allowing you to jump to a particular place in the trailer.

 

http://tinytexts.wordpress.com

Native speakers read short texts aloud, which listeners can follow onscreen or

print a PDF with a gap-fill exercise.  There are also vocabulary definitions.

 

http://www.rivieraradio.mc/home.asp

English-language radio based in Monaco - listen online or at 106.5

 

http://www.webofstories.com/

Video clips under 10 minutes featuring famous and ordinary individuals interviewed on all sorts of topics.  (You also have the option of videorecording and uploading your own story.)

 

http://www.openculture.com/freeaudiobooks

Listen online or download mp3 files to hear novels chapter by chapter.  LM Montgomery's Anne of Green Gables, Paul Auster's The Red Notebook, and Dickens' Great Expectations were favourites.

 

video game walkthroughs

Gamers record screencasts of themselves playing a game and post the video to YouTube.

One student recommends Amnesia White Night (Morfar; strong language and mildly violent/disturbing warning)

http://youtu.be/Vt_y5VE0JiQ

 

SPEAKING

 

http://www.englishcentral.com/videos#!/index

2 minute video extracts with optional subtitles, followed by vocabulary practice (type the word you hear, check native pronunciation with clickable phonetic symbols; repeat a word into your mic and get immediate feedback).  Share on Facebook.

 

https://www.verbling.com/

Live audio or video chat with native speakers.

 

http://livemocha.com/

Live text, audio or video chat with other learners of English.  You can also record a video role-play for feedback from a native speaker (but only once without paying).

 

 

PHONETICS & PRONUNCIATION

 

http://pronunciationcoach.com/

Short explanations and advice for hearing and producing English sounds.

 

http://englishonthe.net/?s=shadow+reading

Advice on a technique for improving pronunciation by reading along with a scripted recording.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Student picks for self-access oral practice: the video game walkthrough was new to me ...

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Shona Whyte's curator insight, December 21, 2012 5:18 AM

These are the websites my third year phonetics students mentioned most frequently during their final oral exams this week.  

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Pronunciation

English Sounds Pronunciation Chart based on an original idea and design by Paul Seligson and Carmen Dolz
Shona Whyte's insight:

Click to listen to vowels, diphthongs, and consonants and see the phonemic transcription (not IPA).

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SID | Speech Internet Dictionary

SID | Speech Internet Dictionary | TELT | Scoop.it

Shona Whyte:

 

Phonetics dictionary, with definitions of a large number of key terms in phonetics.

 

Acknowledgements for contributing entries:

Eva Estebas
John Wells
Jack Windsor Lewis

 

and fo comments, corrections and suggestions:

Martin Ball
Yoshi Fujino
Beatrice Portinari
Petr Rösel
Jack Windsor Lewis

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