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Teacher Education for Languages with Technology / Formation des enseignants de langue avec les TICE
Curated by Shona Whyte
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Why practice makes perfect sense: Anderson, 2016

Among the many lesson planning paradigms used in English language teacher education over the last 40 years, PPP has proven to be one of the most popular and most durable (see Figure 1) despite regular criticism in literature emanating from the Anglophone centre of ELT theory. After presenting a brief history of the paradigm and outlining the main criticisms directed at PPP, especially in the 1990s, I discuss some important research findings from SLA studies since the turn of the century that lend support to PPP-type lesson structures. I briefly analyse parallels between PPP and other teaching paradigms deriving from skill learning theory, linking these paradigms to the expectations of many learners worldwide, and the organisation of content in many mainstream ELT coursebooks. I identify three potential contexts for using PPP, including that of primary and secondary teachers working in low- and middle-income countries, and describe a PPP lesson structure from my own work as a teacher and teacher trainer compatible with best Jason Anderson practice in mainstream teaching. While I caution that PPP cannot and should not be used to structure every lesson, I argue that it can be an appropriate and effective vehicle for the teaching of grammar, functional language and lexis, especially at lower levels of proficiency (up to B2), where the majority of ELT around the world happens, and is likely to happen for the foreseeable future (Graddol 2014).
Shona Whyte's insight:
In defence of PPP.
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#TBLTchat on Twitter

#TBLTchat on Twitter | TELT | Scoop.it
Hello world! This is the post about the first Task-Based Language Teaching and Learning Chat. I wonder what people fancy talking about. Leave a comment to suggest a topic.Keep it TBLT-related and hopefully we'll have a lively discussion.
Shona Whyte's insight:
Marc Jones, EFL teacher in Tokyo (?) has set up a Twitter account and hashtag for discussion of task-based language teaching. Some links here: http://www.scoop.it/t/telt/?q=tblt
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Pedagogic Innovations in foreign language teaching: historical perspectives (16th-21st centuries)

Pedagogic Innovations in foreign language teaching: historical perspectives (16th-21st centuries) | TELT | Scoop.it
Here is the programme of the conference to be held in Faro, Portugal, 7-9 July on ‘Pedagogic Innovations in foreign language teaching: historical perspectives ((16th-21st centuries)
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International Journal of Foreign Language Teaching

International Journal of Foreign Language Teaching | TELT | Scoop.it
Shona Whyte's insight:

Some ten years of issues of this online journal (one PDF with 5-10 articles per year). Plugged by Stephen Krashen on Tea wtih BVP

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Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, November 30, 2015 5:45 AM

I have followed these TESOL resources for years and have a great slide share on

"The Natural Approach" 

http://www.slideshare.net/AjaanRobCMU/the-natual-approach-teaching-methodology-presentation

Janet McQueen's curator insight, December 11, 2015 6:19 AM

Quick link to the online journal index. 

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Fluency versus complexity

Fluency versus complexity | TELT | Scoop.it
Last week, Interchange author Jack Richards began exploring the five biggest challenges faced by students moving from lower-intermediate to upper-intermediate.
Shona Whyte's insight:

Richards on classroom implications for fluency/complexity distinction

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Developing productive competence: Jack Richards

Developing productive competence: Jack Richards | TELT | Scoop.it
All language users have greater receptive competence (language they can understand) than productive competence (language they can produce). I can read great novels for example, but I could never write one. Traditionally, in language teaching we recognize this fact in the distinction between active and passive language knowledge, particularly in relation to vocabulary learning, where it is normally assumed that learners should be able to understand far more words than they can use. And it has generally been accepted that in second-language learning, new items first become part of learners’ receptive competence before becoming part of their productive competence.
Shona Whyte's insight:

Teaching implications of some (oldish) SLA research findings, references included.

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Language & History: Vol 57, No 1

Language & History: Vol 57, No 1 | TELT | Scoop.it

McLellland and Smith:

 

The papers presented in this issue are the result of a workshop held at the University of Nottingham in December 2012 as part of an Arts and Humanities Research Council research network Towards a History of Modern Foreign Language Teaching and Learning (2012–14) intended to stimulate historical research into language teaching and learning. This, the first workshop in the programme, focused on exchanging information on the history of language learning and teaching (HoLLT) across the different language traditions, for it had become clear to us that scholars working within their own language disciplines were often relatively unaware of work outside these. We hope that this special issue — with overview articles on the history of English, French, German, and Spanish as second/foreign languages — will help overcome that lack of awareness and facilitate further research collaboration. Charting the history of language teaching and learning will, in turn, make us all better informed in facing challenges and changes to policy and practice now and in the future.

Shona Whyte's insight:

A new acronym for us: HoLLT, the History of Language Learning and Teaching, lest we forget lots of people have been at this game for a very long time.

 

Articles on English, French, Spanish and German as a foreign language.  The one on English is by Howatt and Smith and takes a European perspective (i.e., British and European).

 

(This journal is also new to me - cover photo seems to be crying out for a caption contest ...)

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Tacking the L in SLA: Geoff Jordan

Tacking the L in SLA: Geoff Jordan | TELT | Scoop.it
After the fun of the Eleven Questions, here are my suggestion for serious ones. 1. Does a theory of SLA need a property theory? In other words: In order to give a full explanation of  SLA, must we ...
Shona Whyte's insight:

Jordan's view of what matters, what should be pursued and what can be safely ignored in second language teaching and learning.

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Language teaching videos: Touring a French City

"The video library excerpts capture the range of foreign language teaching practices shown in the collection. You will see students in elementary, middle, and high school classrooms studying eight different languages. You'll see the students communicating with one another and with their teacher, learning culturally rich content, making connections to other disciplines, comparing cultures, and using the language in real-life contexts."

Shona Whyte's insight:

The Annenberg Foundation has this series of edited classroom videos showing examples of activities taught in second language classrooms with learner and teacher commentaries.  For professional development, there are also questions to guide teachers in their analysis of the examples (French, German, Spanish, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Russian).

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Stephen Krashen interview: British Council Turkey (Dec 2012)

British Council is proud to present an interview with Professor Stephen Krashen. Professor Krashen was kind enough to speak to us on camera during his visit to Istanbul…
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