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Teacher Education for Languages with Technology / Formation des enseignants de langue avec les TICE
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ELT blogging: Geoff Jordan interviewed by Mike Griffin

ELT blogging: Geoff Jordan interviewed by Mike Griffin | TELT | Scoop.it

"... writing a blog helps to sort your ideas out, not just to let off steam. Back with the issue, all writing requires you to take care with sentence construction, coherence and cohesion, all that stuff. Writing  an academic paper takes a lot of work and by comparison, writing a blog post is a walk in the park ..."

 

Shona Whyte's insight:

Mike Griffin visits the house of the big wolf to talk about the pros and cons of the ELT blogosphere, and graduate study in applied linguistics

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TeachingEnglish associates | ELT blogroll

TeachingEnglish associates | ELT blogroll | TELT | Scoop.it

A list of our TeachingEnglish associates, who have been invited to write for the TeachingEnglish blog. They each have extensive experience of teaching, teacher training as well as writing resource books, coursebooks and online course materials.

They have very kindly offered to write blog posts for TeachingEnglish. You can also watch a selection of their webinars on a broad range of relevant and interesting topics on our webinars page.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Very long list of ELT bloggers and links to blogs and posts.

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Teacher Cognition: Geoff Jordan

Teacher Cognition: Geoff Jordan | TELT | Scoop.it
What do teachers actually think they're doing when they teach? Teacher cognition is a hot topic these days, and it seems to be ushering in a new area of interesting study. My attention to this was ...
Shona Whyte's insight:

Geoff Jordan on Borg's work on teacher cognition, with some links and references.

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Student feedback for EFL teachers: Michael Griffin

Student feedback for EFL teachers: Michael Griffin | TELT | Scoop.it
Nononymous feedback? I think most teachers have faced the situation when they got generally feedback back from a class but there was one student who gave less than favorable comments or had a negat...
Shona Whyte's insight:

Thoughts on how the way student feedback is elicited affects its usefulness to the teacher from ELT blogger Michael Griffin. Includes links to other blog posts on this topic.  

 

[I'm trying to track down a post I read a few weeks ago where another ELT blogger used a system of coloured cards: one thing students thought the teacher should stop doing, one thing to keep doing, and one thing to consider.  Ring any bells for anyone?]

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10 ELT blogs: Sandy Millin

10 blogs in 10 minutesSandy MillinIH Newcastle
Shona Whyte's insight:

ELT professional Sandy Millin chooses her top ten ELT blogs.

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Extensive Watching: David Deubelbeiss blog post

Extensive Watching: David Deubelbeiss blog post | TELT | Scoop.it

“Extensive Watching“. I’d like to outline this important concept for language learning here and get your own feedback, opinion, thoughts. (and this compliments what I’ve also termed, “Narrow Watching“.

Shona Whyte's insight:

My colleague Geoff Sockett at the University of Strasbourg has been looking at this as part of informal learning http://prismelangues.u-strasbg.fr/uploads/media/Eurocall_handout_01.pdf  Interesting and important topic - what are learners getting out of this type of exposure to English, and is there a role for teaching to help them get more?

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Shona Whyte's curator insight, February 28, 2013 10:16 AM

Why watching your favourite series can help you learn English.

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Album anglais école primaire : Go away big green monster

Album anglais école primaire : Go away big green monster | TELT | Scoop.it
Album : Go away big green Monster Projet : réaliser un livre numérique en binôme Le travail autour de cet album a fait l'objet d'une classe TICE. CLIC : classe A séquence. (Par manque de temps, je ne mets pas les fiches de prépa...
Shona Whyte's insight:

Enseignante à l'école primaire Sylvie Hanot partage ses activités et ses ressources, ainsi que ses réflexions sur l'enseignement de l'anglais au primaire.

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Blogging as Pointless, Incessant, Barking

Blogging as Pointless, Incessant, Barking | TELT | Scoop.it
This cartoon is on a card my sister sent me a few years ago; I have kept it on my refrigerator along with the gallery of dogs past. But I’m not that dog, I’m still at the blogging, Apri...
Shona Whyte's insight:

I'm thinking about how to encourage trainee teachers to develop personal learning networks, so this think piece by Alan Levine - interested in the educational applications of technology - looks like a useful piece of the puzzle.

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Curating vs. Collecting on Twitter for the Education Professional

Curating vs. Collecting on Twitter for the Education Professional | TELT | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
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Discussion of the utility of online curation for oneself and others; importance of tagging (also important on Scoop.it): "I am carefully thinking about future keywords I might be searching for in order to recall a particular tweet (s)."

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NDgrazer's curator insight, January 9, 2013 1:18 AM

 

Silvia Rosenthal Tolisano has an interesting and highly visual post on collecting vs. curating with Twitter, and on the curation potential Twitter has in store for those involved in education.

 

She quotes Mike Fisher writing: "Collecting is what kids do when asked to find resources for a particular topic. Usually, it represents the first 3 or 4 hits on a Google search, without meaning, discernment, or connections.


Curating is different. It’s the Critical Thinker’s collection, and involves several nuances (see Figure 1) that separate it as an independent and classroom-worthy task."

 

 

Useful. Resourceful. 7/10

 

Full article: http://langwitches.org/blog/2013/01/03/twitter-as-a-curation-tool/# ;

 

 

Baptiste Morch's curator insight, January 9, 2013 4:49 AM

 

Silvia Rosenthal Tolisano has an interesting and highly visual post on collecting vs. curating with Twitter, and on the curation potential Twitter has in store for those involved in education.

 

She quotes Mike Fisher writing: "Collecting is what kids do when asked to find resources for a particular topic. Usually, it represents the first 3 or 4 hits on a Google search, without meaning, discernment, or connections.

 

Curating is different. It’s the Critical Thinker’s collection, and involves several nuances (see Figure 1) that separate it as an independent and classroom-worthy task."

 

 

Useful. Resourceful. 7/10

 

Full article: http://langwitches.org/blog/2013/01/03/twitter-as-a-curation-tool/# 

 

 

Eduardo Lucas's curator insight, April 29, 2013 9:50 AM

Important article.

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22 Great Posts For Language Learners from 2012 | The Everyday Language Learner

Aaron G Myers presents an annotated list of posts by language learning bloggers which he found inspirational in 2012.

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Shona Whyte's curator insight, December 19, 2012 7:31 AM

During a week of phonetics orals for EFL students at my university, it's nice to see more ideas to help learners get out there and make progress ...

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The Thesis Whisperer: Personal learning net(works)

The Thesis Whisperer: Personal learning net(works) | TELT | Scoop.it
Excellent post on the invisible, foraging work that precedes and underpins articulation or "real" work.

"The Thesis Whisperer is a newspaper style blog dedicated to helping research students everywhere. It is edited by Dr Inger Mewburn of RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia and has contributors from around the world."
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An impromptu interactive dictogloss in 10 steps

An impromptu interactive dictogloss in 10 steps | TELT | Scoop.it

EFL teacher/MA student Laura Patsko talks us through an unplanned intermediate lesson using the IWB in a dictogloss activity with two students.

 

Dictogloss involves the teacher reading a script which the learners write down, leaving space for more details picked up in subsequent listenings.

 

Laura then had the learners write their text on the IWB, which they used to edit: moving words around, adding and replacing elements.  She then worked on accuracy, and finally had them highlight useful expressions for their notebooks.

 

Her blog post has explanations, the recording, plus photos of the IWB and IWB slides, so it's very easy for other teachers to follow.  So whether you're looking for ideas for your teaching, or examples of practice that may be different from what you're used to, this is a nice post (and Show and Tell is a nice blog).

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ENSEIGNANT WEB 2.0 et LANGUES

ENSEIGNANT WEB 2.0 et LANGUES | TELT | Scoop.it

Chris Jaeglin, enseignant d'allemand en région strasbourgeoise maintient ce blog sur les TICE pour les langues depuis 2008.  Outils, ressources, liens utiles ...

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The trouble with ELT Blogs: Geoff Jordan

The trouble with ELT Blogs: Geoff Jordan | TELT | Scoop.it

ELT blogs are part of an online philistine culture where complacency is encouraged and robust critical discussion is frowned on.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Making sure "the nervous, tethered sheep who are presumed to make up the readership of the blogs are not upset" or “You don’t criticise me and I won’t criticise you”?  Geoff Jordan asks why ELT blogs don't engage with more important issues about language teaching and learning and adopt a more critical stance. 

 

Perhaps because they're written by practitioners and materials writers focusing on practical concerns?

 

Jordan's "interesting" questions include these two

• What is the current most widely-accepted explanation of SLA?
• In the multi-billion ELT industry, why do a tiny minority of people get rich while the vast majority of workers stay poor?

 

For me, the first is a question for academics/researchers, and the second is political.

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Academic Blogging: Taylor & Francis

Academic Blogging: Taylor & Francis | TELT | Scoop.it

Our infographic on blogging is inspired by
"Why do academics blog? An analysis of audiences, purposes and challenges"
by Inger Mewburn & Pat Thomson (2013)
Studies in Higher Education.

 

Shona Whyte's insight:

To blog or not to blog

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Lives of teachers: interviews

ELT teacher Darren Elliot interviews well-known researchers and authors from Stephen Bax to Ken Wilson.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Impressive selection of A-listers: Egbert, Firth, Krashen, Nation, Swan among others.

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Now You're Cheating

Now You're Cheating | TELT | Scoop.it

Five of the following sentences are wrong. In pairs, identify which they are, and discuss why they are wrong. 

1.      You’re absolutely right! I am agreeing with you.

2.      I was writing a letter to my mum on the train, but I didn’t have time to finish it.

3.      She’s working as an au pair until she goes to university.

4.      We stay with our parents until the work on our house is done

5.      My grandfather is knowing how to text.

6.      Look. He talks to the linguistics professor.

7.      Peter is studying telecommunications at the moment

8.      These days mobile phones get smaller.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Funny, interesting post (and informed comments) about decontextualised grammar correction exercises.  When we did those UG-inspired "can you say this in your idiolect" tests when I was in grad school, it always boiled down to how much imagination and effort you were prepared to apply.  (Now we have corpora.)

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aplinglink: Geoff Jordan on applied linguistics

aplinglink: Geoff Jordan on applied linguistics | TELT | Scoop.it
For those doing postgraduate work in Applied Linguistics
Different sections on topics such as SLA (Jordan published a 2004 book on SLA theory), links to sites and videos on relevant research, references for theory and teaching, and advice on writing a thesis.
Shona Whyte's insight:
Accessible and lively presentations suitable for graduate students and beyond; forthright and occasionally hilarious annotated reference list.
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Open up: new blog from COERLL

Open up: new blog from COERLL | TELT | Scoop.it

Welcome to COERLL’s brand new blog, Open Up, devoted to conversations about open education in language learning. Here educators can get informed and dream together about dynamic, community-driven open educational practices in language learning.

Shona Whyte's insight:

A welcome addition to the University of Texas at Austin's excellent OER for language learning.  It is certainly the logical next step to add to language learning materials and teacher development resources, but a blog is a big investment - we wish them well :-)

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Blogroll

Blogroll | TELT | Scoop.it
Language teaching blogroll Learning from others, sharing with others, collaborating with others: these are maxims we as teachers value and should value. Others are our community of language teachin...
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ELT blogs - read about other teachers' views, experiences and ideas on teaching English as a foreign language

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ELT blog posts: Rachel Roberts' selection

ELT blog posts: Rachel Roberts' selection | TELT | Scoop.it
For the New Year I wanted to collect together some of the blog posts which have either inspired my posts over the last year, or that would be great follow up reading. In a few weeks, I will celebra...
Shona Whyte's insight:

A rich list of EFL/ESL teachers' blog posts, organised by category (group work, writing, methodology).

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Top 100 Language Lovers 2012 – bab.la & Lexiophiles

Top 100 Language Lovers 2012 – bab.la & Lexiophiles | TELT | Scoop.it
Worldwide ranking of the Top 100 Language Lovers 2012 including a short blog description and a link to every language lover.
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5 Ways to Use Google Sites in Schools

5 Ways to Use Google Sites in Schools | TELT | Scoop.it

Shona Whyte:

Richard Byrnes of Free Technology for Teachers suggests five ways to exploit Google sites in education -

1.wiki

2. portfolio

3. file cabinet

4. blog

5. website


Via Yuly Asencion
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EFL- ESL BLOGS WORTH FOLLOWING

EFL- ESL BLOGS WORTH FOLLOWING | TELT | Scoop.it
Shona Whyte:
A nice collection of teachers' blogs in different languages, with teaching resources, ideas and reflections
which can help other teachers.
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Nik's QuickShout: AudioBoo to Posterous: Audio Podcasting from the Classroom

Nik's QuickShout: AudioBoo to Posterous: Audio Podcasting from the Classroom | TELT | Scoop.it

This is an older (2010) post from Nik Peachey explaining how to link a Posterous blog with the podcasting site AudioBoo for speaking activities.

 

He explains how to upload students' recordings directly from the classroom using mobile apps.  One click puts the audio on AudioBoo and posts it to Posterous.  In the way, students can listen to each other's recordings and post comments, and the teacher can provide feedback, all via the blog.

 

This is something I like to do with classes yet always seems to involve a lot of clicking on my part, and perhaps less engagement from learners as they hear their presentations days after the event.  So I'll be checking this combination out to see if it will work for me.

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