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Teacher Education for Languages with Technology / Formation des enseignants de langue avec les TICE
Curated by Shona Whyte
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Van der Zwaard: Patterns of (negotiated) interaction during telecollaboration between NSs and advanced NNSs

Dyadic communication between Australian and Dutch participants during a digital task designed as part of a telecollaboration project

The research project focuses on the occurrence of negotiation of meaning (or absence thereof) during one - to - one interaction via two forms of synchronous computer - mediated communication (SCMC): video call (or video call) and instant chat - messaging (written chat).

The studies aim to combine two of the most significant trends in L2 - education: digital technology and task - based language teaching (TBLT). Research into the efficacy of communication through different digital tools within L2 - learning environments is still underdeveloped, although the 21st - century networked society is entering the language classroom and educators are urged to include digital communication in (academic) language acquisition curricula. Negotiation of meaning studies have proven to be a prolific research area, although different claims have been made concer ning occurrence and effect and only recently have investigations started to explore the implications of negotiation of meaning during synchronous computer - mediated com munication. The studies in this book attempt to contribute to this budding area of research.
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Book based on van der Zwaard's dissertation at University of Amsterdam
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Instructed Second Language Acquisition

Instructed Second Language Acquisition is a peer-reviewed Journal that, twice a year, publishes research with a number of implications for language instruction. Second language acquisition is a rich and varied enterprise, carried out by researchers, whose interests and training often lie in broader disciplines of linguistics, psychology, sociology, and education. Second language research findings might have a direct application to instructional decisions or provide insights into the learning process that serves as a resource to inform teaching practice. Knowing how languages are learned will help language instructors develop a more innovative and effective way to teach a language and to create the necessary conditions for learners to learn more efficiently and appropriately. The overall aim of this Journal is to provide an opportunity for researchers, second and foreign language educators, and other language practitioners and policy makers to publish and read second language acquisition research that has direct relevance and impact for language teaching. Established in 2016, Instructed Second Language Acquisition, the journal is a forum for reporting and for critical discussion of language research and practice across a wide range of languages and international contexts. It welcomes quantitative and qualitative research to address the role of external manipulation (e.g., instruction, learner self-directed learning, input manipulation) on second language development.
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New journal
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XVII Congresso Internazionale AItLA – CALL FOR PAPERS

XVII Congresso Internazionale AItLA – CALL FOR PAPERS | TELT | Scoop.it

The Conference is open to contributions from the following areas of research:


Using second languages in the teaching of non-language subjects (CLIL, university foreign language teaching, foreign language training for job mobility etc.)


Using second languages in professional communication (linguistic and cultural mediation, company management, scientific, institutional and multimedia communication etc.)


Using second languages in technology (localization, assisted translation, automatic dialogue strategy adaption etc.)


Using second languages with people who have disabilities (hearing and vision impairment, dyslexia, Parkinson’s disease, mental or behavioural disorders etc.)


SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE Anna De Meo, Bernardo Magnini, Margaret Rasulo, Patrizia Sorianello


ORGANIZING COMMITTEE Anna De Meo, Margaret Rasulo, Lucia di Pace, Rossella Pannain, Domenico Proietti, Raffaele Spiezia


Conference proposals can be either individual papers or poster sessions, which will undergo a selection process by the Scientific Committee. The Conference will also host a number of invited keynote speakers. Individual paper proposals will have a 20-minute presentation session followed by a 10-minute open discussion. Each poster proposal will have a 5-minute plenary session followed by a more detailed discussion to be held in a designated poster area.

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Call extended until 30 September
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Special Issue: New Directions in L2 Speech Fluency, Editors: Clare Wright and Parvaneh Tavakoli : International Review of Applied Linguistics in Language Teaching

Special Issue: New Directions in L2 Speech Fluency, Editors: Clare Wright and Parvaneh Tavakoli : International Review of Applied Linguistics in Language Teaching | TELT | Scoop.it
Special Issue: New Directions in L2 Speech Fluency, Editors: Clare Wright and Parvaneh Tavakoli
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Open access at present; interesting set of papers, Skehan et al contains extremely clear presentation of Levelt's processing model as applied to L1 and L2 speech production.
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L2 interactional competences: 2017 conference

L2 interactional competences: 2017 conference | TELT | Scoop.it
Under the heading ‘L2 interactional competences and practices in a second language’ (ICOP-L2), this conference brings together researchers from various horizons (e.g. linguistics, education, sociology) who investigate how people engage in second language talk-in-interaction: What are the basic ingredients of L2 interactional competence? How does such competence vary across situations and over time? How do L2 speakers use the linguistic resources at their disposal to accomplish social actions in coordination with others? How do linguistic and other resources (gaze, gesture, posture) work together in L2 talk? How does social interaction structure learning processes and learning products? How can L2 interactional competence and learning through interaction be addressed in educational contexts?  These are among the questions that will be tackled during the conference.
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CfP May 2016
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Book Now Hotel with cheap rate near Tajmahal on http://www.hotelatagra.com 
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Complex systems & applied linguistics: Larsen-Freeman & Cameron, 2008 (review)

Complex systems & applied linguistics: Larsen-Freeman & Cameron, 2008 (review) | TELT | Scoop.it
Complex Systems and Applied Linguistics by Diane Larsen-Freeman and Lynne Cameron. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008, 287 pp. Review by Brian Ellis University of California, Los Angeles In their book Complex Systems and Applied Linguistics, Diane Larsen- Freeman and Lynne Cameron argue that language is a complex adaptive system. As they describe, complex adaptive systems of all types share several features in common. They are made up of aggregates of diverse elements or agents that interact locally and which may form interconnected subsystems. They are dynamic, in a constant state of change. Their processes are non-linear, sensitive to initial condi- tions, controlled from the bottom up, and abide by a predictable unpredictability (sometimes referred to as chaos). They are open, not closed systems, which means their complexity is sustained far from equilibrium by input (of energy or informa- tion) into that system. They adapt in response to changes in their environment. Finally, this environment or context is not separate from the system but part of it. In all of these ways, language is a complex adaptive system, but this book goes a great deal beyond simply making that point. First, the authors develop complex- ity theory as a metaphor for language. They then address each of the main topics of research in applied linguistics through the lens of this metaphor. Along the way, they exemplify the practical use of the complexity metaphor by re-analyzing empirical data from past research. The first three chapters review complexity theory and form a road map for applying complexity theory as a metaphor in language research. The remaining chapters then put this framework to use by reinterpreting data from research in all the core areas of applied linguistics - language acquisition, second language learn- ing, language testing and foreign language instruction. Furthermore, the authors do a tremendous job relating complexity theory to numerous other fields of research, from formal linguistics to conversation analysis, synthesizing their own coherent view in the process. Without presenting themselves as overtly critical of alternative perspectives, the authors strongly favor a discourse-centered approach that utilizes complexity theory to better understand and model language dynamics. Chapter 1 introduces the reader to a complexity perspective. The main idea is that the world is not composed of ‘things’ but of perceived stabilities that emerge from complex system dynamics. From this perspective, language is an open, con- tinually evolving complex system. Chapter 2 summarizes the defining characteristics of complex systems, while chapter 3 identifies types and trajectories of change that occur in them (covering such oddities as strange attractors). For language scholars unfamiliar with but interested in learning more about complexity theory, this book Issues in Applied Linguistics © 2008, Regents of the University of California ISSN 1050-4273 Vol. 16 No. 2, 197-198
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Cited by Daniel Véronique in response to Lowie's presentation on CDST - pedagogical implications

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Target language use | The Language Gym

Target language use | The Language Gym | TELT | Scoop.it
Posts about Target language use written by Gianfranco Conti, Phd (Lang. Ed.), MA (TEFL)
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Some arguments for using L1 in the language classroom

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How does mother tongue affect second language acquisition?

How does mother tongue affect second language acquisition? | TELT | Scoop.it
A new study is exploring how a person’s native language can influence the way the brain processes auditory words in a second language.

 

Annie Tremblay: [C]ues, such as intonation, are harder to master and are more likely to be influenced by a speaker’s native language. Tremblay points to English where a stressed syllable is a strong indication that a new word is beginning. But in French the opposite is true; prominent syllables tend to be at the end of words.

 

“This kind of information can’t be memorized in a language such as French. It has to be computed. And this is where second language learners struggle,” Tremblay said.

 

An example of confusion is the French phrase for cranky cat, which in French is “chat grincheux.” For a brief second, the phrase can sound like the English pronunciation for “chagrin,” a word with French origins.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Research behind this Language Magazine article paywalled here

Differential contribution of prosodic cues in the native and non-native segmentation of French speech

http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/lp.2012.3.issue-2/lp-2012-0018/lp-2012-0018.xml

 

 

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ANGLISH: Anne Tortel, 2008

ANGLISH: Anne Tortel, 2008 | TELT | Scoop.it

Base de donnéescomparatives de l’anglais lu, répété et parlé en L1 & L2 

 

63 locuteurs :

GB : 23 locuteurs, 13 femmes et 10 hommes, britanniques anglais ;

FR2: 20 locuteurs, 10 étudiantes et 10 étudiants anglicistes, fin de 2ème/début 3ème année ;

FR1: 20 locuteurs, 10 femmes et 10 hommes en activité ayant niveau Bac anglais L2.

 

Le corpus ANGLISH est en libre accès sur le Centre de Ressources pour la Description de l’Oral (CRDO) <http://crdo.fr.>

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