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Teacher Education for Languages with Technology / Formation des enseignants de langue avec les TICE
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Chomsky Was Right, We Possess An Internal Grammar

Chomsky Was Right, We Possess An Internal Grammar | TELT | Scoop.it

A team of neuroscientists has found new support for MIT linguist Noam Chomsky’s decades-old theory that we possess an “internal grammar” that allows us to comprehend even nonsensical phrases.

 

 

Shona Whyte's insight:

Poeppel: "Because we went to great lengths to design experimental conditions that control for statistical or sound cue contributions to processing, our findings show that we must use the grammar in our head,” explains Poeppel. “Our brains lock onto every word before working to comprehend phrases and sentences. The dynamics reveal that we undergo a grammar-based construction in the processing of language.”

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Breffni O'Rourke's curator insight, January 11, 8:18 AM

Via Shona Whyte, definitely one for the to-read list. I'll be interested to see whether the study shows that rules are the ONLY mechanism for parsing, or that it is one mechanism available in special conditions such as the ones the researchers created in the lab.

 

NB: in the Neuroscience News write-up, they say that we can recognise Chomsky's famous example “Colorless green ideas sleep furiously” as simultaneously nonsensical but grammatically well-formed because "the statistical relations between words are non-existent". Not so: see http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/000025.html


 

 

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Synchronous technologies for language learning: Promise and challenges in research and pedagogy

Synchronous technologies for language learning: Promise and challenges in research and pedagogy | TELT | Scoop.it
By Breffni O'Rourke in Digital Media And New Literacies and CALL. Keynote (Breffni O'Rourke) at Language. Learning. Technology, Leuphana University Lüneburg, 20-21 April 2015 Online communication ceased to be a niche interest many years ago.
Shona Whyte's insight:

Interesting overview of state-of-art, citing eyetracking studies by Bryan Smith: http://llt.msu.edu/issues/october2012/smith.pdf

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Call For Papers | EUROCALL 2016

The 23rd EUROCALL Conference will be held at the Cyprus University of Cyprus in Lemesos (Limassol) Cyprus from 24th to 27th August 2016.

CALL Communities and Culture

The theme of EuroCALL 2016 is CALL Communities and Culture. It offers a unique opportunity to hear from real-world CALL practitioners how they practice CALL in their communities, and how the CALL culture developed in local and global contexts. CALL has moved from traditional drill-and-practice programmes in the 1960s and 1970s to more recent manifestations of CALL, such as the use of interactive whiteboards, corpora and concordances, Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC), to the applications used in virtual learning environments and e-learning, virtual worlds, gaming and Mobile-Assisted Language Learning (MALL). Keeping an eye on the latest changes and on the future, and being well informed, are critical success factors for the CALL community. So the questions are:

 

 

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31 January 2016

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ELTED issue on teacher training

ELTED issue on teacher training | TELT | Scoop.it
Editor: Gerard Sharpling Editorial Committee: Peter Brown, Annamaria Pinter, Gerard Sharpling, Richard Smith (Chair), Ema Ushioda, Steve Mann & Dario Banegas Contents  |  Contributors Articles...
Shona Whyte's insight:

6 new articles in this issue

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The Two Faces of SLA: VanPatten 2010

Language consists of two broad domains: (1) mental representation, and (2) skill (use), although within each domain there are separable sub-domains (e.g., syntax, phonology, lexicon, semantics, and so on in mental representation; and reading, writing, speaking, and so on, in skill). The implications of such a view are that the development of different parts of language may respond to different stimuli in the environment. What is more, some domains may be more or less amenable to explicit instruction and practice while others are stubborn or resistant to external influences.

Shona Whyte's insight:

VanPatten argues against explicit grammar instruction (making the no-interface argument, pace DeKeyser)

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A task is a task is a task: Muller-Hartmann, April 2016

A task is a task is a task: Muller-Hartmann, April 2016 | TELT | Scoop.it

The concept of task has become central not only to an understanding of language learning per se, but also to the design and research of telecollaborative learning environments. But what kind of task concept is conducive to supporting language learning, and how can we best research this?

To answer these questions, I will specifically look at the role of the learner in my talk. While research on the design of tasks in telecollaborative settings has been very productive, we still lack insights into the interaction processes on the micro level when learners negotiate task content. What are learners doing, and how can we find out about it?

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Breffni O'Rourke's curator insight, December 8, 2015 4:31 AM

Thanks for posting, Shona! One of our great keynote speakers for the Telecollaboration Conference in April 2016. Now to post the other two abstracts...

Shona Whyte's comment, December 8, 2015 7:39 AM
No worries Breffni. Was admiring your slowburn comm strategy for this conference by trickling out the keynote info, but I see you've switched tactics :-)
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Language Learning Teaching: Leuphana 2015

Language Learning Teaching: Leuphana 2015 | TELT | Scoop.it
Shona Whyte's insight:

Keynotes by Michael Thomas and Breffni O'Rourke.  Abstracts online here.

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Innovations pédagogiques dans l’enseignement des langues étrangères : perspective historique (XVIe-XXe siècles)

Innovations pédagogiques dans l’enseignement des langues étrangères : perspective historique (XVIe-XXe siècles) | TELT | Scoop.it

La Société internationale pour l’histoire du français langue étrangère ou seconde (SIHFLES), en collaboration avec les associations sœurs, l’APHELLE (Associação Portuguesa para a História do Ensino das Línguas e Literaturas Estrangeiras), la SEHEL (Sociedad Española para la Historia de las Enseñanzas Linguísticas), le CIRSIL (Centro Interuniversitario di Ricerca sulla Storia degli Insegnamenti Linguistici), la Henry Sweet Society for the History of Linguistic Ideas et le PHG (Peeter Heynsgenootschap), et avec le soutien de HoLLT.net – réseau de recherche en histoire de l’apprentissage des langues et de l’enseignement de l’AILA – et de l’APEF (Association portugaise d’études françaises), organise un colloque international, en partenariat avec l’université d’Algarve, du 7 au 8 juillet 2016, consacré à l’étude des « Innovations pédagogiques dans l’enseignement des langues étrangères ».

Shona Whyte's insight:

Proposals in English also

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The return of translation: opportunities and pitfalls

The return of translation: opportunities and pitfalls | TELT | Scoop.it

For most of the 20th century, there was a deep-rooted tradition in the ELT, which dates back to the Direct Method, that L1 in the classroom should be avoided at all costs. Although there were some alternative methods, such as Community Language learning (aka ‘counsel-learning’) and Dodson’s Bilingual Method, which made use of the learners’ L1 and used translation, most ELT methods of the last century were clearly ‘target-language’ only and some even went as far as to take a clearly anti-L1 stance in order to avoid interference.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Quick history of the place of L1 in EFL teaching methodologies, and some ideas for using translation in class if you are so moved

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Teachers research: Bullock & Smith

9 examples of language teacher action research from IATEFL 201'

Shona Whyte's insight:

35 page PDF, free to download

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Research Evidence and L2 Teaching

Research Evidence and L2 Teaching | TELT | Scoop.it
I have for many years been interested in one basic (but big) question: why do language teachers teach in the ways they do? This question has driven much of my work on teacher cognition, since under…
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Simon Borg shares some reflections on the relationship between research and (language) teaching practice and ways to "address the recurrent sentiment among teachers than research has no relevance to their work"

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Latin as a second language: the 'a' of SLA

Latin as a second language: the 'a' of SLA | TELT | Scoop.it
 Teaching Latin to HumansHow to Honor both the Language and the Learner: Justin Slocum Bailey

 

If I summon my explicit knowledge of grammar, vocabulary, or “reading strategies” to make sense of a sentence, I have not gotten better at understanding Latin; I have merely coped with my inability to understand Latin at that level. It’s sometimes important or rewarding to be able to cope with texts above one’s level. But why structure our Latin courses so that this is the best possible outcome?

Shona Whyte's insight:

Interesting application of hard-line cognitivist theory of acquisition (VanPatten) to teaching/learning of classical languages.

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The Young Language Learners (YLL) Symposium: July 2016

The Young Language Learners (YLL) Symposium: July 2016 | TELT | Scoop.it

The Department of Education, University of Oxford is very pleased to announce the second international conference on Young Language Learners (YLL) 2016.

As part of the AILA REN on Early Language Learning, we would like to welcome you to join us in the city of the ‘dreaming spires’ for a meeting on issues surrounding YLLs in July 2016.  The conference will focus on early second and foreign language learning in school contexts (pre-primary and primary), covering different bilingual and L2/FL provision in school contexts across the globe.  This symposium will provide opportunities for colleagues from a range of professional backgrounds (e.g., researchers, teachers, policy makers) to establish links and help expand the work in this important area of language development.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Great keynotes: Sylva, Munoz, Enever, Spada.

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Moving a step further from “integrative CALL” Gimeno, 2015

Moving a step further from “integrative CALL” Gimeno, 2015 | TELT | Scoop.it

Moving a step further from “integrative CALL”. What's to come?. . 

 

This paper reflects upon the evolution of technology-enhanced language learning throughout the past two decades based on the author's own experience and how Information and Communications Technologies have played a prominent role on how language teaching pedagogies have evolved alongside the technologies themselves. Reference is made to the milestones that have marked the evolution of computer-assisted language learning (CALL) and how future trends are developing. The author discusses her vision of CALL and develops the concept of “atomised CALL”, a theory first introduced in 2013. Atomised CALL describes the field of CALL from 2010 onwards, i.e. from Mark Warschauer's definition of “integrative CALL”. In relation to Bax's theory about the “normalisation” of CALL, the author defends that, as long as technology continues to evolve and new gadgets appear on the market, there will always be a place for CALL developers and authors to find the optimum way of pedagogically exploiting these forever-emerging technological developments.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Ana Gimeno-Sanchez on the evolution of the field. Looks like open access for now.

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Classroom-based research: Kostoulas & Lämmerer 2015

Classroom-based research is a teacher-driven activity that
aims to find out what works best in our classrooms, so that we might improve our practice, and – ultimately –make learning
more effective for the benefit of our students.

Shona Whyte's insight:

13 page handbook on research for classroom (language) teachers

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Second language research and teaching: 10 videocasts

Second language research and teaching: 10 videocasts | TELT | Scoop.it

The Musicuentos Black Box is a collection of video podcasts and other media resources designed to address the great disconnect in world language teaching: the lack of effective communication between researchers investigating how people learn language and the teachers working to help those people develop communicative language skills.

Shona Whyte's insight:

I just watched the second in this series of 10 videocasts which aim to make second language research accessible to language teachers by summarising and illustrating articles by researchers like Long, VanPatten, Krashen, Lantolf. No. 2 is on VanPatten's Two faces of SLA http://dialnet.unirioja.es/servlet/articulo?codigo=3358525 and seems to make a nice job of presenting the author's main points.

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Critical CALL – Proceedings of the 2015 EUROCALL Conference, Padova, Italy

Critical CALL – Proceedings of the 2015 EUROCALL Conference, Padova, Italy | TELT | Scoop.it
Francesca Helm, Linda Bradley, Marta Guarda, Sylvie Thouësny.
Shona Whyte's insight:

Open access volume now available

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International Journal of Foreign Language Teaching

International Journal of Foreign Language Teaching | TELT | Scoop.it
Shona Whyte's insight:

Some ten years of issues of this online journal (one PDF with 5-10 articles per year). Plugged by Stephen Krashen on Tea wtih BVP

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Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, November 30, 2015 5:45 AM

I have followed these TESOL resources for years and have a great slide share on

"The Natural Approach" 

http://www.slideshare.net/AjaanRobCMU/the-natual-approach-teaching-methodology-presentation

Janet McQueen's curator insight, December 11, 2015 6:19 AM

Quick link to the online journal index. 

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Assessing oral communication: Ockey & Li, 2015

Assessing oral communication: Ockey & Li, 2015 | TELT | Scoop.it
The assessment of oral communication has continued to evolve over the past few decades. The construct being assessed has broadened to include interactional competence, and technology has played a role in the types of tasks that are currently popular.
Shona Whyte's insight:

Overview of 5 types of assessment: oral proficiency interview, pair/group discussion, simulated task, integrated task and elicited imitation.

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Juan Miguel Guirado's curator insight, November 27, 2015 5:41 AM

#SCEUNED15 porque sin comunicación oral no hay mejora de un idioma extranjero, debemos tener muy en cuenta su evaluación y diseñarla acorde a las necesidades y capacidades de nuestros alumnos

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Where are the experts? VanPatten 2015

It is common belief that language departments consist of experts in language and language learning. I am writing to tell you that this is not true. Language departments are largely—and in some cases, exclusively—concerned with literary and cultural studies. Such departments have little concern for the nature of language and less concern for how language is acquired. In most language departments, outdated myths about language and language acquisition inform most curricular development and pedagogical practice at all levels. The reason for these outdated myths is that there is no real presence of language science in these departments. As a consequence, many language departments are not the best places to learn language—in spite of what you might hear.

 

With the above said, I do not mean to question literary and cultural studies. Where would the humanities be without such efforts? But if you haven’t already found the following out, I will say it plainly: an expert in literary and cultural studies is almost always not an expert in language, language acquisition, or language teaching, in spite of what that person might claim. In fact, demographic data suggest that less than 20% of the professoriate in language departments actually consists of language experts (i.e., hold doctorates in some kind of language science and conduct research in this expertise). Six percent or less (depending on the language) are actual experts in language acquisition—a field that has direct implications for language teaching. In many institutions, there are no experts in language or language acquisition in a language department.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Open letter in recent essay in Hispania by Van Patten. Good to see the argument made so cogently.

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EUROCALL review: Sept 15

EUROCALL review: Sept 15 | TELT | Scoop.it
Table of Contents

Research paper: Facebook for informal language learning: Perspectives from tertiary language students. Antonie Alm.
Research paper: Telecollaboration insights: learning from exchanges that fail. Anna Turula and Thomas Raith.
Research & development paper: Developing CALL for heritage languages: The 7 Keys of the Dragon. Anthi Revithiadou, Vasilia Kourtis-Kazoullis, Maria Soukalopoulou, Konstantinos Konstantoudakis and Christos Zarras.
Reflective practice paper: Exploring two teachers’ engagement with their students in an online writing environment. Nagaletchimee Annamalai and Kok Eng Tan.
Recommended website: Bab.la. Andrés Piñero.
Shona Whyte's insight:

Lots of interesting titles here. Read more to check out your NSFBF quotient ...

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Justifying Language Teacher Cognition Research

Justifying Language Teacher Cognition Research | TELT | Scoop.it

One fundamental question teacher cognition research needs to address clearly is ‘why is it important to understand what teachers know, believe, think and feel?’ Today it is not enough to study, for example, teacher beliefs, for their own sake – a more concrete reason is needed. And for this reason I am critical (see Borg 2015) of papers which increasingly describe teacher cognition without any ulterior purpose or sense of how such insights might be of value. It can often be, though, difficult to provide a convincing answer to the ‘why’ question above, so let’s consider some examples.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Discussion of ground rules for teacher cognition research

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irvin's curator insight, November 5, 2015 3:57 PM

language teacher  cognition research