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Teacher Education for Languages with Technology / Formation des enseignants de langue avec les TICE
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The Big List of Class Discussion Strategies

The Big List of Class Discussion Strategies | TELT | Scoop.it
Here they are: 15 formats for structuring a class discussion to make it more engaging, more organized, more equitable, and more academically challenging.
Shona Whyte's insight:

Different formats and activities to encourage discussion in class

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Arizona State University, Claire McLaughlin's curator insight, February 5, 3:15 PM

Are you tired of the same few students answering discussion questions?  Or having the class go completely silent when discussion time begins?  If yes, this article has a variety here to get students discussing.  I love how this article breaks it down the prep time from easy to difficult.  

Veronica Newton's curator insight, February 6, 6:09 PM

"15 formats for structuring a class discussion to make it more engaging, more organized, more equitable, and more academically challenging. If you’ve struggled to find effective ways to develop students’ speaking and listening skills, this is your lucky day."

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Concepts for Teaching Speaking in the English Language Classroom | Burns | LEARN Journal: Language Education and Acquisition Research Network

Concepts for Teaching Speaking in the English Language Classroom


Via Phil Chappell
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Burns says not do "do" speaking but "teach" speaking, and provides reasons and examples

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Phil Chappell's curator insight, January 23, 12:07 AM
Abstract Systematically and explicitly addressing the teaching of speaking is an aspect of English language teaching that is often underestimated. While teachers may be presenting various speaking activities in the classroom, such activities may amount to ‘doing speaking’ rather than ‘teaching speaking’. In this article, I argue that being a competent teacher of speaking involves understanding the ‘combinatorial’ nature of speaking, which includes the linguistic and discoursal features of speech, the core speaking skills that enable speakers to process and produce speech, and the communication strategies for managing and maintaining spoken interactions. The article concludes by presenting a ‘teaching-speaking cycle’ (Goh and Burns, 2012) that teachers can use to plan tasks and activities that explicitly address these aspects of speaking and that scaffold student learning
Sacra Jáimez's curator insight, February 5, 1:34 PM

An insightful article on how teaching speaking should be planned to help learners become more aware and autonomous in dealing with an speaking task inside the classroom or once outside in the real world.

 

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Five tips to encourage spontaneous talk

Five tips to encourage spontaneous talk | TELT | Scoop.it

1. Teach masses of vocabulary,

2. Involve students in lots of oral interaction

3. Expose learners to lots of comprehensible aural input

4. Model to students creative ways to put a message across

5. Ask them to practise digitally-mediated interactional writing independently

Shona Whyte's insight:

Going beyond the parrot stage

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Preparing teachers to teach pronunciation: Burri, 2015

Preparing teachers to teach pronunciation: Burri, 2015 | TELT | Scoop.it
Burri, M. (2015). ‘My perspective changed dramatically’: A case for preparing L2 instructors to teach pronunciation. English Australia Journal, vol 32.1, pp. 19-37. Access the article to read onlin...
Shona Whyte's insight:

Participate in discussion of this account of research into EFL teachers' attitudes to the teaching of pronunciation.

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Arizona State University, Claire McLaughlin's curator insight, November 11, 2015 2:48 AM

I am one of the teachers who runs away from teaching pronunciation classes, and I was never properly taught how to teach it.  The research article is just that, but definitely go to the last paragraph before the summary.  That information hit home for the reason I will try to infuse more pronunciation practice in my lessons.

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"Does my child have good pronunciation?"

"Does my child have good pronunciation?" | TELT | Scoop.it
I lost count of the number of times I got asked this over three days of parent-teacher meetings at my school. In fact, I don't know if this was the exact question they asked, because we rely on tra...
Shona Whyte's insight:

Some common pronunciation problems young learners may have, and some quick fixes, all in layman's terms.

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#ELTchat: listening/speaking with online resources

#ELTchat: listening/speaking with online resources | TELT | Scoop.it
This is a summary of the #ELTchat from September 23
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Another good collection from ELT regulars

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Sound chart: Mark Hancock

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Download from the original website

This infographic gives a brief explanation of how the new Pronpack Sound Chart is organized. - See more at: http://hancockmcdonald.com/blog/pronpack-sound-chart-explained#sthash.55ueLR05.dpuf
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All by yourself: monologues in elementary speaking

All by yourself: monologues in elementary speaking | TELT | Scoop.it
Speaking has top priority in most language courses … but how do you get your learners talking? To answer this question, Urs Kalberer starts by looking at the different types of speaking, as seen in the diagram above.
Shona Whyte's insight:

Ideas for teaching speaking with lower level learners

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Shadow-reading experiment

Shadow-reading experiment | TELT | Scoop.it
I've recently done some research into shadow-reading and at some point I promised myself that I'd soon experiment with it a bit in the classroom.
Shona Whyte's insight:

Interesting account of activities for practicing intonation

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Pronunciation theory and practice: new issue of Journal of Academic Language & Learning

Editorial

Introduction to special issue: New directions in pronunciation theory and practice

Emmaline Lear, Michael Carey, Graeme Couper

 

Research Articles

Evidence that L2 production training can enhance perception

Gary Linebaugh, Thomas Bernard Roche

 

An L1 point of reference approach to pronunciation modification: Learner-centred alternatives to ‘listen and repeat’

Michael David Carey, Arizio Sweeting, Robert Mannell

 

“The tutor never asked me questions”: Pronunciation and student positioning at university

Shem Macdonald

 

Learners’ views of social issues in pronunciation learning

John Levis

Shona Whyte's insight:

Open access articles

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poetryarchive.org

poetryarchive.org | TELT | Scoop.it
City lilacs In crack-haunted alleys, overhangs, plots of sour earth that pass for gardens, in the space between wall and wheelie bin, where men with mobiles make urgent conversation, where bare-legged girls shiver in April winds, where a new mother stands on her doorstep and blinks at the brightness of morning, so suddenly born - in all these places the city lilacs are pushing their cones of blossom into the spring to be taken by the warm wind.
Shona Whyte's insight:

Listen to poety and read along.  Use it for shadow-reading, to practice intonation, or to pick up vocabulary of a literary nature

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Shona Whyte's curator insight, March 9, 2015 1:52 PM

Resources for listening to poetry

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The Melody of English: webinar summary

The Melody of English: webinar summary | TELT | Scoop.it
The full title of this webinar - The Melody of English: Research and Resources for Teaching the Pragmatic Functions of Intonation - is a real mouthful and it was the very first PronSIG event that I...
Shona Whyte's insight:

Clear and well-structured overview by Adi Rajan of a webinar by Marnie Reed and Tamara Jones, including rationale for teaching intonation in English plus teaching activities and an up-to-date reference list.

 

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Academic speaking & listening course: Masters in Teaching English

Academic speaking & listening course: Masters in Teaching English | TELT | Scoop.it

Resources for pre-service EFL teachers in France, who need to prepare for national entrance examinations involving formal literary presentations and listening to authentic extracts.  So a focus here on academic English oriented towards cultural studies with a task-based format and links to authentic sources as well as EAP materials.

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I actually just wanted a short link for my slides, but thought I might as well share here

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audioBoom

audioBoom | TELT | Scoop.it
15 December 2015 What is audioBoom? audioBoom is an app that allows you to record and broadcast your own spoken-word recordings and podcasts for free, making it one of the most popular audio apps with audio bloggers, journalists, teachers, and podcasters.  audioBoom also has a huge library of professional and educational audio content for you…
Shona Whyte's insight:

Nice overview of what this tool can do and how to make the most of it in (language) education

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Articulatory setting: an approach to pronunciation teaching

Articulatory setting: an approach to pronunciation teaching | TELT | Scoop.it
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A short introduction to articulatory setting or voice setting, and some links to background reading, research, and pedagogical applications.

 

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Getting students to TEACH, not to PRESENT!

Getting students to TEACH, not to PRESENT! | TELT | Scoop.it

Getting students to research and then present their findings to the class can be done in a number of ways. However, consider ditching the word ‘presentation’ in favour of ̵…

Shona Whyte's insight:

This is a good way of putting it to try and avoid death by powerpoint.

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Elena's curator insight, November 10, 2015 2:29 PM

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Karina Scholtz Mulder's curator insight, November 16, 2015 6:50 AM

This is really the way to learn!

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Lesson Idea: Taboo

Lesson Idea: Taboo | TELT | Scoop.it
Taboo has always been one of my favourite warmers. Of all the language learning games I’ve used, this particular one has really stood the test of time in my teaching.
Shona Whyte's insight:

I like this game for EFL too

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Audio Diaries: feedback via SoundCloud

Audio Diaries: feedback via SoundCloud | TELT | Scoop.it

The concept of Audio Diaries is actually quite simple. Students record something (on or off topic, with or without using target vocabulary or language structures). Students are then given feedback on their grammatical, lexical, and phonological errors. Finally, students re-record the same exact monologue, but this time, they must address their errors. In this way, students are getting delayed corrective feedback and forced uptake of feedback, in addition to raising their noticing and metacognitive skills. They are also getting individual attention, targeted practice in their “weak” areas, and more opportunities for speaking without the pressures of speaking in class.

Aside form typical complaints about too much homework, students seem to enjoy Audio Diaries. They enjoy the feedback and being able to have another chance to express their thoughts in a clearer way. In addition, by listening more closely to individuals I am better able to pinpoint and help them with their weaknesses in and out of class. Likewise, I am better able to notice persistent and common patterns and address them in class.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Some background on the role of feedback on learning, links to technical information, and some action research on regular audio recording for accuracy in oral production.

 

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Academic speaking: persuasive techniques from Patrick Andrews

Teaching on a course for teachers from universities in China, I found quite a lot of interest in teaching persuasion.  Here are some materials that I have developed on the area, making use of a TED talk.

There are also elements of developing critical analysis in that the learners are encouraged to think of the extent to which some of the claims are justified and the extent to which the speaker is trying to manipulate the listener.

Shona Whyte's insight:

He's also running a MOOC, but it's nearly over, I guess.

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Sharalike: Audio Slideshow

Summarizing the highlights of an event, summarizing the key points in a story, and summarizing the results of research project are all common purposes for creating audio slideshows.
Shona Whyte's insight:

Tutorial for video presentations

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Effects of pedagogic intervention on development of speech fluency: Tavakoli et al. 2015

Effects of pedagogic intervention on development of speech fluency: Tavakoli et al. 2015 | TELT | Scoop.it

This study measured the fluency of learner speech before and after a 4-week intensive English course at a British university. The experimental group received awareness-raising activities, strategy training, and fluency practice, while the control group received more general listening/speaking instruction. On 4 of 9 fluency measures, the experimental group outperformed the control group; speech rate showed the largest advantage, but articulation rate, mean length of run and of pause were also significantly better. (The study also measured accuracy and complexity, but found no difference on 3 of 4 measures, and a slight advantage to the control group on verb accuracy.)

 

The authors suggest that

"providing effective instruction and creating opportunities for practice facilitated the process of proceduralisation of learner interlanguage, which might have contributed to the learners’ preparedness for developing a degree of automatisation in their performance (DeKeyser, 2001, 2007; Segalowitz, 2010)" (p. 17)

 

They conclude that

"a key finding of the current study is that, although the classroom context often provides limited and insufficient opportunities for L2 practice, tailor-made training aimed at improving fluency can have short-term positive effects" (p. 20)

 

Shona Whyte's insight:

This is an interesting finding from what looks like well-designed and controlled research, using fewer than 40 learners but in an ecologically valid study and including a range of measures of fluency, accuracy and complexity.  While explanation of the findings in terms of second language theory goes beyond the scope of the paper, the teaching implications are encouraging.  

 

Of interest to language teachers are the following:

 

1. Activities to raise awareness of different aspects of fluency. Students listened to a nonnative speaker of English retelling a picture story and evaluated the speaker’s fluency in terms of speed, pausing, and repair measures. Students examined the transcript of the picture story retelling and identified where fluency had broken down.

2. Strategies that can be used for improving fluency. Using lexical fillers (e.g., well) and longer lexical chunks (e.g., let me think) and practising them in conversations. Avoiding repetitions and hesi- tations in conversations when possible.

3. Opportunities for practising fluency. In class: Retelling the picture story that they had listened to in exercise 1. At home: Retelling another picture story and recording their performance, listening

to their own performance to identify fluency problems, and recording their performance of the same task again.


(Ahead of print free access for now.)

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Two New Apps That Are Great for Recording Audio Interviews

Two New Apps That Are Great for Recording Audio Interviews | TELT | Scoop.it
This week I tested two new apps for recording audio interviews. Both of these apps can be used by students without creating any kind of new online accounts. Neither one is entirely perfect, but they're both quite good.
Shona Whyte's insight:

Opinion and Story app. Why not?

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Dara Oken's curator insight, April 2, 2015 3:40 AM

Could be great for pronunciation assessment purposes.

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Learning your lines: using dialogues for speaking practice

Learning your lines: using dialogues for speaking practice | TELT | Scoop.it

Kevin Stein on helping learners to work with coursebook dialogues.

 

Shona Whyte's insight:

Creative, practical solutions to the problem of making this kind of speaking exercise come alive in the language classroom.

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