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Teacher Education for Languages with Technology / Formation des enseignants de langue avec les TICE
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Pronunciation Bites

Pronunciation Bites | TELT | Scoop.it
Here you will find a collection of tweets, posts, websites, articles and videos for your pronunciation classes. The inclusion of the materials on this list does not endorse its content in any way. Theoretical errors or biased views of any kind are not my own. (Follow Pronunciation Bites on Blogger, Twitter, Facebook and Pinterest by visiting my profile: http://about.me/pronunciationbites)***Use the tag search below or the filter on top to do topic search ***
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Pronunciation links for EFL students

Pronunciation links for EFL students | TELT | Scoop.it
UnPolish your English, learning pronunciation, teaching pronunciation, links for students, accents, pron
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Arizona State University, Claire McLaughlin's curator insight, March 23, 5:35 PM
Great resources for teaching pronunciation.
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How to pronounce feather in English - Forvo

How to pronounce feather in English - Forvo | TELT | Scoop.it
How to pronounce feather in English. The definition of feather is: the light horny waterproof structure forming the external coverin
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Haven't checked this for a while: seems like a nice resource if you have doubts about the pronunciation of a particular word. I checked random words in French and English and found a range of nativelike pronunciation. Very easy to search and listen.
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Research Bites: Reading, Pronunciation, and the Phonological Loop

Summary and reaction to “Phonology in Second Language Reading: Not an Optional Extra”, Walter (2008)
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Accessible summary of research on reading/pronunciation connection, with implications or at least an invitation to discuss implications for ELT
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THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*'s curator insight, March 5, 2016 2:26 AM
Accessible summary of research on reading/pronunciation connection, with implications or at least an invitation to discuss implications for ELT
Pilar Moral's curator insight, March 13, 2016 6:57 AM
Accessible summary of research on reading/pronunciation connection, with implications or at least an invitation to discuss implications for ELT
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The Saga of Schwi: Ward, 2013

As it happens, the name schwi is helpful in naming a higher type of schwa, closer in sound to short I. You see, there is a hypothesis that English has two distinct types of schwas, one which is closer and one which is opener. The difference is epitomized by the phonetic contrast between ‘Georgia’s’ and ‘George’s,’ between ‘affect’ and ‘effect,’ or between ‘Lennon’ and ‘Lenin’ (in both these examples, the first one has the more open vowel). Among commentators on John Well’s English phonetics blog, the closer one is often called schwi and the opener one is often called schwa. (Wells himself has not embraced the term schwi.)

That’s the origin of the word schwi in a nutshell, but there’s more to it than that.

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Via @GlenysHanson

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Articulatory setting: an approach to pronunciation teaching

Articulatory setting: an approach to pronunciation teaching | TELT | Scoop.it
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A short introduction to articulatory setting or voice setting, and some links to background reading, research, and pedagogical applications.

 

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