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Teacher Education for Languages with Technology / Formation des enseignants de langue avec les TICE
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Compleat Lexical Tutor

A complete website for learning and learning about English and French words. You can test your vocabulary level, then work on the words at the level where you are weak. Use wordlists, online concordancer and dictionary, texts, and a database to store your work and view the work of others. French parallel site is almost complete.

 

Instructions for learners:

 

Lexical Tutor > Tutorial Guide (Original - about 2005 but still relevant)

You can use this site to expand your English vocabulary systematically (and your French vocabulary too). The site has a set of diagnostic vocabulary tests, and a corresponding set of vocabulary lists linked to concordance, dictionary, and quizzes to help you explore the nuances of form, meaning, and collocation of the words on these lists. Here's one way to proceed:

- Test yourself to determine your next zone of vocabulary growth. Start with either the Classic (GSL+UWL) or BNC (1-14k) word recognition tests (GSL=General Service List; UWL=University Word List; BNC = British National Corpus).
- Go to the Learn from Lists pages and find the level which you are weak on either the same scheme you chose for your test.
 Work your way through the list with the aid of the dictionary and concordance. Develop an approach that suits you--make notes, cut and paste examples and definitions to the Group Lex Database provided, or a spreadsheet on your own computer. Also, a set of progress tests is linked to the the 2000 and UWL lists at roughly 250-word intervals.

- If you do not like learning from lists, or want to learn more about new words by meeting them in other contexts, then you can paste complete authentic texts into VP Cloze, which will make you exercises for words from the frequency band you are working on.

- Or, if you want to work outside the frequency framework altogether, but not entirely independently, then you can read a novel  (Jack London's Call of the Wild or de Maupassant's Boule de Suif) with full click-on lexical support.  - or make your own resource-supported texts at Hypertext Builder


The 1000, 2000, and University/Academic Word Lists contain words you need to know - read the research page to learn why.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Grading first year student translations and looking for places to send them to learn vocabulary

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Answer to What are concepts in other languages for which there is no English word/phrase? - Quora

Answer to What are concepts in other languages for which there is no English word/phrase? - Quora | TELT | Scoop.it

I hate to rain on everyone's parade (well, I don't really hate to), but this is one of those linguistic myths that has captured the public's imagination but isn't really grounded in fact and empiricism.

Ultimately, this question can be answered in 3 ways, depending on how you parse it, essentially negating the basic premise of the question.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Nicely put.

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Oxford Text Checker | Oxford Advanced Learners Dictionary

Oxford Text Checker | Oxford Advanced Learners Dictionary | TELT | Scoop.it
Oxford Text Checker at OxfordLearnersDictionaries.com. The Oxford Text Checker will check the vocabulary in any text against the Oxford 3000 word list. See more at oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com.
Shona Whyte's insight:

Paste your text in the box and find out what percentage of the words belong to the "Oxford 3000" suggested as the most useful for learners. 75% means your text is advanced, 90% upper intermediate, and 100% makes it lower intermediate (or below, I assume).

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EasyDefine - Define multiple words quickly

EasyDefine - Define multiple words quickly | TELT | Scoop.it
Look up multiple words quickly. Simply copy and paste a list with any delimeter. Definitions/synonyms are immediately available for viewing, emailing, or downloading.
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nicolaperry's curator insight, February 18, 2013 10:28 PM

I tried a quick random list of words and the definitions seemed pretty good but not for lower level learners. I couldn't find any information about which dictionary they have used. 

 

It's quick, though, so could be useful in class for instant results and to use for word games. 

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Academic Word List: vocabulary exercises for EFL/ESL learners

Academic Word List: vocabulary exercises for EFL/ESL learners | TELT | Scoop.it
Vocabulary Exercises for the AWL

 

This site now contains 285 gap-fill exercises to review and recycle the general word families contained within the AWL. These exercises can be found on each Sublist page. Gap-fill exercises are an excellent way to recycle vocabulary through different contexts and can be used to broaden the student's understanding of the range of meaning of vocabulary. The online format of the exercises allows students to get immediate feedback on their answers. Students can work throughfive different exercises for each word family in the AWL. Many of these exercises include different derivations (parts of speech) for the given word. Students are encouraged to complete the exercises for a given level before proceeding to the next level.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Gerry Luton at the University of Victoria in Canada has a special interest in vocabulary acquisition.

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COURS PARTICULIERS's curator insight, February 17, 2013 3:27 AM

Anglais : exercices pour revoir et apprendre du vocabulaire

Miguel Ángel García's comment, February 17, 2013 4:21 AM
IT is a really good site to learn vocabulary. Different levels!
Ellen Johnston's curator insight, March 6, 2014 9:14 PM

http://www.uefap.com/vocab/select/awl.htm

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Research into practice: Vocabulary (Nation, 2011)

Research into practice: Vocabulary (Nation, 2011) | TELT | Scoop.it

This article is a personal view of the application of research on vocabulary to teaching and how there are three different types or categories of relationship between that research and the teaching to which it is applied: first, where the research is not applied or not applied well, second, where it is reasonably well applied, and third, where it is over-applied. For each of these three categories, I look at what I consider to be the most important areas of research and suggest why they fit into that category. The topics covered include planning vocabulary courses, distinguishing high frequency and low frequency words, extensive reading, the deliberate learning of vocabulary, academic vocabulary and vocabulary teaching.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Here are my bullet points from reading this article which summarises recent research into L2 vocabulary acquisition for language teachers.

 

- there two types of vocabulary: high frequency and low frequency (Zipf's law - there is no middle ground).  ESL learners need to meet high frequency words often, and learn strategies to tackle low frequency words

 

- extensive (rather than intensive) reading with graded readers works for high frequency words; learners can be encouraged in this if initial class time is devoted to a "proper extensive reading program" (p. 532)

 

- bilingual word cards - "deliberate decontextualised rote learning of vocabulary" - is effective for long-term learning and acquisition of implicit knowledge (p. 533)  though should be viewed as a "support" rather than an "alternative to communicative learning"

 

- although deliberate learning is effective, deliberate teaching does not mean deliberate learning - studies often show less than half of taught words were learned via vocabulary exercises

 

Nation recommends paying attention to vocabulary learning via extensive graded reading and independent learning with bilingual word cards, rather than devoting class time to intensive reading and vocabulary exercises.

 

He recommends this research paper:

Elgort, I. (2011). Deliberate learning and vocabulary acquisition in a second language. Language Learning, 61.2, 367–413.

 

and this website: The Compleat Lexical Tutor http://www.lextutor.ca/

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Academic Word List exercises: University of Nottingham

Word lists and various useful tools for manipulating texts.


Via Robin Yu
Shona Whyte's insight:

Nice set of tools and activities for English for Academic Purposes.

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Robin Yu's comment, January 16, 2013 7:01 AM
The word lists can be found elsewhere but the highlighter tools and gap-fill maker are unique tools from Nottingham.
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Vocabulary learning: what the research says

Vocabulary learning: what the research says | TELT | Scoop.it
I’ve just read Peter Yongqi Gu (2003)Vocabulary Learning in a Second Language: Person, Task, Context and Strategies Here are a few interesting points which emerge. All references can be found at th...
Shona Whyte's insight:

Old-fashioned dictionary work, memorisation of translation pairs still have their place, research shows.  But other activities (and more research) are needed to go beyond word recognition to appropriate use.

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Shona Whyte's curator insight, February 23, 4:04 AM

How to learn more words so you can understand them, but also use them ...

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Some user-friendly concordance ideas

Some user-friendly concordance ideas | TELT | Scoop.it
Although corpora are now widely used in putting together ELT Dictionaries, and increasingly used in writing ELT materials, it is still rare, I think, for corpora, and especially for concordances to...
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Shona Whyte's curator insight, March 6, 2013 5:38 PM

Nice post on using corpora for ELT without being a corpus linguist or a tech whiz.

Stanislav Okhvat's curator insight, April 13, 2013 12:09 AM

A nice introduction to corpora and concordance tools and how they are useful in teaching languages and, by extension, translation.

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Foreign languages: how to memorise vocabulary - Anne Merritt

Foreign languages: how to memorise vocabulary - Anne Merritt | TELT | Scoop.it
To “get by” in a language it takes a vocabulary of about 120 basic words. Anne Merritt explains how to learn them.
Shona Whyte's insight:

See also a research-based look at vocabulary acquisition from Paul Nation http://www.scoop.it/t/telt/p/3994725134/research-into-practice-vocabulary-nation-2011

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Shona Whyte's curator insight, February 5, 2013 6:21 AM

Some ideas for developing good study skills.  

Carmenne K. Thapliyal's curator insight, April 14, 2013 6:23 AM

These could be good techniques for memorising lexis.... but honestly, how important is it to 'memorise' vocab ... shouldn't the stress on the 'application' of already acquired vocab???? 

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Compleat Lexical Tutor

Compleat Lexical Tutor | TELT | Scoop.it
A complete website for learning and learning about English words. You can test your vocabulary level, then work on the words at the level where you are weak.
Shona Whyte's insight:

As recommended by vocabulary researcher Paul Nation.

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Research on teaching vocabulary: Paul Nation

Research on teaching vocabulary: Paul Nation | TELT | Scoop.it

Shona Whyte:

Paul Nation has a huge number of publications on vocabulary, particularly in relation to second language learning and teaching.  Many of the older articles are available for free download.

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