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Teacher Education for Languages with Technology / Formation des enseignants de langue avec les TICE
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A World of Englishes: Flipping phonetics

A World of Englishes: Flipping phonetics | TELT | Scoop.it

Jane Setter: "The flipped classroom basically involves presenting what would normally be lecture content via vodcasts which the students watch ahead of the class, thus allowing more time in the actual class itself for practical work. This approach works well in the sciences where a lot of practical work is needed for students to progress, and [and it is] also suitable for phonetics, which also requires a lot of rehearsal of skills and time for class discussion of issues. 

I had wanted to try this for a while as I have been becoming increasingly concerned that the growing number of students I have in my class meant that I had less time to spend with each of them and that it was difficult to support individual student needs. Thanks to a small grant from the University of Reading's "Partnerships in Learning and Teaching" (PLanT) pilot scheme, I was able to buy some software to do video capture of my desktop which enables me to record video and audio of me narrating my way through my lecture slides. I then post these on our virtual learning environment, Blackboard, for the students to view ahead of class."

Shona Whyte's insight:

Account of a university teaching experiment with links to teaching resources (vodcasts) and student reactions (and final test scores).

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The Flip: End of a Love Affair

The Flip: End of a Love Affair | TELT | Scoop.it

A little over a year ago I wrote a postabout the flipped classroom, why I loved it. When I recently re-read the post, I didn’t disagree with anything I’d said. Yet my brief love affair with the flip has ended. It simply didn’t produce the tranformative learning experience I knew I wanted for my students .


Via Nik Peachey, Mark Pegrum
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Making Interactive Lectures

Making Interactive Lectures | TELT | Scoop.it

Shona Whyte:

 

"Created by Heather Macdonald College of William and Mary and Rebecca Teed, SERC and updated by Gail Hoyt, University of Kentucky, Jennifer Imazeki, San Diego State University, Barbara Millis University of Texas, San Antonio, and Jose Vazquez-Cognet University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

 

This module on Interactive Lectures provides strategies and specific examples of techniques and activities designed to involve students in large and small lecture-based classes. The module is designed for the instructor who does not want to replace lecture, but rather to enhance and punctuate lecture to create an interactive classroom experience."


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Konstantinos Kalemis's comment, August 9, 2012 9:44 AM
Interactive lectures can increase student engagement with course material and facilitate learning. In traditional lectures, the majority of class time is devoted to the instructor’s delivery of information. During interactive lectures, the instructor interrupts the lecture to allow time for short activities.
These activities can take on many forms as discussed later, but they are important in that they allow students to use material learned in class and contribute to their own learning.During lecture breaks, the instructor poses a question or problem that promotes students to actively work with the concepts learned in class. Because learners tend to retain information based on their involvement in the learning process, transforming students from passive receivers of information into active users of information leads to increases in student retention of material.
The idea of incorporating activities within lecture time is often met with the criticism that it wastes time that could be used to cover additional course material. However, sustained lectures that exceed the typical attention span of 10-20 minutes do not ensure that the material is actually reaching students. In fact, students record in their notes a greater percentage of material from short lecture segments than they do from longer lectures. Many of the activities described below take only a few minutes to implement, but still provide important learning opportunities for students.Another benefit of using activities within lectures is that it can create a feedback loop for instructors to get information about student learning earlier than the exam or major assignment date. Seeing students struggle with an activity can be the stimulus for the instructor to review important concepts related to that activity.
In recent years, the lecture has fallen on hard times.
Prominent researchers have raised doubts about its use, claiming that lectures rely on rote learning and fail to promote active engagement. Yet most of us have either attended or delivered wonderful lectures—lectures that have expanded our thinking, provided fresh insights, or opened our eyes to new worlds. Clearly, lectures can be an efficient way of transmitting large amounts of information in a relatively small amount of time.
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The Flipped Classroom: The Full Picture

The Flipped Classroom: The Full Picture | TELT | Scoop.it

Jackie Gerstein made a 2-minute video on the Flipped Classroom, "a model of learning based on the experiential learning cycle" using a tool called PowToon.

 

Shona Whyte:

It's too much too quick if you've never head of the flipped classroom, but otherwise it's a neat summary of the main elements of this teaching approach.

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The foreign language flip class stages: Part 1 | Reflipping the flipped

The foreign language flip class stages: Part 1 | Reflipping the flipped | TELT | Scoop.it

Shona Whyte:

Spanish teacher Emilia Carrillo shares her reflections and experience of the flipped classroom (content delivery at home, language practice in class).  This is the first of a four-part series on how language teachers can go about flipping their classrooms, beginning with things to take into consideration before you start.

 

This article includes links to other posts on Emilia Carrillo's technology blog and to presentations by other teachers.  This is the Harvesting Stage (Washing, peeling, chopping, Let’s get cooking Stage and Digesting to follow).


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The Flipped Class: Myths vs. Reality

The Flipped Class: Myths vs. Reality | TELT | Scoop.it

A nice 3-part overview of the Flipped Classroom in the Daily Riff by Jon Bergmann, Jerry Overmyer, and Brett Wilie, US high school maths, science and technology teachers.

 

This has been a fashionable topic in recent months:

"The idea of the flipped class started with lecture and direct instruction being done at home
via video and/or audio, and what was once considered homework is done in class. So, the order of the "lecture" and "homework" components of the class are, well -- flipped."

 

For language teachers, if you're already using communicative or task-based approaches, there won't be much lecture material to be removed.  But the flipped class is worth thinking about if your learners spend a lot of time copying down lessons to memorise or reciting rules in class: is there a way to transmit this explicit grammar instruction outside class time (videos, PDFs?) to leave more space for using the language?

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The Flipped Classroom: Professional Development Workshop

The Flipped Classroom: Professional Development Workshop | TELT | Scoop.it

"Module One – Powerful Learning Experiences During this module, we will think about, explore, and discuss these areas: Qualities and characteristics of epic learning. Building a community and student engagement as prerequisites for a successful flipped classroom."

Jackie Gerstein

 

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Record & Share your Ideas | Present.me

Record & Share your Ideas | Present.me | TELT | Scoop.it

Present.me is your slides, and a video of you presenting them, side by side on the screen at the same time. It’s the next best thing to being in a room with people you want to communicate with, and as it’s on demand, it’s available for anyone to view whenever it suits them. The potential for Present.me for Educators is endless- it is perfect for the flipped classroom, for students to submit projects, practise their presentation skills and much, much more.


And Present.me is now available in a new multi-user version. As an academic institution you can sign up for a Team account which provides your school, college or university with a private portal in which you can create, view and manage presentme’s. Discover Present.me for yourself here: http://present.me/


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Linda Buckmaster's curator insight, December 25, 2012 10:52 PM

Best rescoops of 2012... I use this particularly for SEN students with little or no reading skills for their individual learning plans!

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“Flipping the Classroom” for Language Learners | Voxy Blog

“Flipping the Classroom” for Language Learners | Voxy Blog | TELT | Scoop.it

Shona Whyte:

A little piece on how the flipped classroom fits task-based learning models and why it can help language teaching and learning by freeing up class time for interaction in the target language.

 

(Voxy.com sells online English tuition for Hispanic speakers.)

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Shona Whyte's comment, July 30, 2012 7:02 AM
More on the Flipped Classroom here http://www.scoop.it/t/telt/?tag=flipped%20classroom
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The Full Picture onThe Flipped Classroom:

The Full Picture onThe Flipped Classroom: | TELT | Scoop.it

Jackie Gerstein says:

"I have been writing about and presenting on Flipped Classroom Model: The Full Picture for about a year now. The model that I propose is one where video lectures and tutorials fall within a larger framework of learning activities. I am titling it the Flipped Classroom Model to get folks’ attention given the Flipped Classroom popularity right now. It really is a experiential cycle of learning, where the video lectures support not drive the learning process.

A major roadblock or barrier to implementing the flipped classroom is that many educators do not know what to do in the classroom with the time once spent doing lectures. For educators, who are used to and use the didactic model, a framework is needed to assist them with the implementation of the Flipped Classroom."

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Flipping the Classroom Requires More Than Video

Flipping the Classroom Requires More Than Video | TELT | Scoop.it

Here's what I think is relevant to language teachers about the flipped classroom:

 

"“If you structure your class exactly the same way you have always done but employ it flipped,” warns Richard Talyor, CMO for Echo360, “effectively what you have done is added an extra hour of class for every hour of class the student has. Respect the students’ time"

 

It's the extra time that language learners need, in addition to opportunities for interaction.

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Flipped Classroom: The Full Picture for Higher Education

Flipped Classroom: The Full Picture for Higher Education | TELT | Scoop.it

Jackie Gerstein of User Generated Education has this extremely well-documented and readable article, including information, illustrations, links and examples of pedagogical changes linked to technology integration in post-secondary education.

 

It's relevant to my own teaching/training context in the French university system; these quotes stand out for me:

 

- Educators need to be re-educated as to what to do with the class time that previously was used for their lectures.

- Learning institutions are no longer the gatekeepers to information. Anyone with connections to the internet has access to high level, credible content.

- The educator becomes a facilitator and tour guide of learning possibilities – offering these possibilities to the learners and then getting out of the way.

 

Without wishing to make spurious or superficial connections, it seems these points also apply to modern language teachers moving from grammar-translation to more communicative and/or task-based approaches to language teaching.  Teachers trained in grammar-based approaches need to learn how to plan and implement different types of learning activities.  They need to adapt to the fact that their learners can access good target language input and information without their teachers' help.  And they need to de-centre their teaching to allow learners the opportunity to use the language amongst themselves.

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