TELT
55.8K views | +10 today
Follow
TELT
Teacher Education for Languages with Technology / Formation des enseignants de langue avec les TICE
Curated by Shona Whyte
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Shona Whyte
Scoop.it!

Teaching English to Young Learners: Supporting the Case for the Bilingual Native English Speaker Teacher

(2016). Teaching English to Young Learners: Supporting the Case for the Bilingual Native English Speaker Teacher. Classroom Discourse: Vol. 7, No. 3, pp. 221-238. doi: 10.1080/19463014.2016.1192050
Shona Whyte's insight:
We will show that in the context of the young learner classroom, teachers who know the children’s L1 have a greater repertoire of teaching skills and so can provide more language learning opportunities for language learning. This reality, we believe, supports the case for employing bilingual teachers wherever possible for the young learner classroom.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Shona Whyte from Group work and interaction in language learning classrooms
Scoop.it!

Concepts for Teaching Speaking in the English Language Classroom | Burns | LEARN Journal: Language Education and Acquisition Research Network

Concepts for Teaching Speaking in the English Language Classroom


Via Phil Chappell
Shona Whyte's insight:

Burns says not do "do" speaking but "teach" speaking, and provides reasons and examples

more...
Phil Chappell's curator insight, January 22, 2016 7:07 PM
Abstract Systematically and explicitly addressing the teaching of speaking is an aspect of English language teaching that is often underestimated. While teachers may be presenting various speaking activities in the classroom, such activities may amount to ‘doing speaking’ rather than ‘teaching speaking’. In this article, I argue that being a competent teacher of speaking involves understanding the ‘combinatorial’ nature of speaking, which includes the linguistic and discoursal features of speech, the core speaking skills that enable speakers to process and produce speech, and the communication strategies for managing and maintaining spoken interactions. The article concludes by presenting a ‘teaching-speaking cycle’ (Goh and Burns, 2012) that teachers can use to plan tasks and activities that explicitly address these aspects of speaking and that scaffold student learning
Sacra Jáimez's curator insight, February 5, 2016 8:34 AM

An insightful article on how teaching speaking should be planned to help learners become more aware and autonomous in dealing with an speaking task inside the classroom or once outside in the real world.

 

Scooped by Shona Whyte
Scoop.it!

When in Rome: thoughts from the ELF6 conference

When in Rome: thoughts from the ELF6 conference | TELT | Scoop.it
I returned this week from Rome, where I attended the 6th annual conference of English as a lingua franca (ELF6) held at Roma Tre University. I'm not much of a conference lover, so it helps when the...
Shona Whyte's insight:

Ray Carey reports on the recent English as a Lingua Franca conference in Rome, with links to abstracts from presentations.

more...
Matthew Absalom's comment, September 17, 2013 5:37 AM
I love your description of the IC stuff - so spot on... Palatino any day!
Scooped by Shona Whyte
Scoop.it!

Classroom discourse: articles on foreign language

Lots of articles on classroom interaction, use of L1 and L2, characterising dialogue/conversation in the language classroom
Shona Whyte's insight:
Just the paywall problem
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shona Whyte
Scoop.it!

The teacher is a facilitator: Farrell 2016

The teacher is a facilitator: Farrell 2016 | TELT | Scoop.it

Metaphors offer a lens through which language teachers express their understanding of their work. Metaphor analysis can be a powerful reflective tool for expressing meanings that underpin ways of thinking about teaching and learning English as a second/foreign language. Through reflecting on their personal teaching metaphors, teachers become more aware of the beliefs that underpin their work. This paper reports the reflections on the prior beliefs of three experienced ESL teachers in Canada through the use of metaphor analysis. The paper attempts to explore the prior beliefs of the three experienced ESL teachers in Canada through metaphor analysis by using the Oxford et al. (1998) framework as a theoretical lens in which to gain understanding of the use and meaning of these metaphors. Results indicated that all three teachers used a total of 94 metaphors throughout the period of the group discussions and interviews, and that the metaphors used most were those related to learner-centered growth, followed by social order, then social reform.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Analysis of metaphors in EFL teacher discourse using Oxford et al framework (see Table above). 8-page paper, open access.

 

[Look at those dates: Received 14/12/15, Accepted 19/12/15, Revision received 19/12/15; Online 01/01/16]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shona Whyte
Scoop.it!

Discourse, Context & Media | Vol 1, Iss 1 (March 2012)

Shona Whyte:

New journal edited by Greg Myers which he hopes "will be a forum for the best studies of media discourse. The first issue shows some of the range of the field, including studies of broadcast interviews, computer games, blogs, and on-line and print newspapers, some taking quantitative approaches and others doing very fine-grained qualitative analysis, some more linguistic and some more sociological."

 

March 2012 issue currently free to download, with papers on gaming, blogs and more traditional media.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.