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Teacher Education for Languages with Technology / Formation des enseignants de langue avec les TICE
Curated by Shona Whyte
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Tips and techniques for correcting spoken errors: Rachael Roberts

Tips and techniques for correcting spoken errors: Rachael Roberts | TELT | Scoop.it
This is the third part in a series on oral correction.

Rachael Roberts: "Perhaps the key thing with all of these techniques is to remember and to help students remember that mistakes are indeed a gift. They are how the teacher can evaluate what needs teaching or reviewing, and they are often the moment when a student finally ‘gets’ something that they have never quite understood."
Shona Whyte's insight:
Signals a teacher can use to prompt self-correction when students are speaking.
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Individual learner feedback: WednesdaySeminars

Individual learner feedback: WednesdaySeminars | TELT | Scoop.it
Welcome! This is a collection of thoughts and reflections about teaching and teacher education, and some other things too.
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Try this it works! Error correction for speaking: Chris Smith

Try this it works! Error correction for speaking: Chris Smith | TELT | Scoop.it
A brief history of error correction in different language teaching methods with references, and some firm conclusions about the utility of corrective feedback in the (English) language classroom
Shona Whyte's insight:
Other links to articles and blog posts on this topic: http://www.scoop.it/t/telt/?q=corrective+feedback
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"I am going to looks like stupid": language commentary & correction in spoken ELF

"I am going to looks like stupid": language commentary & correction in spoken ELF | TELT | Scoop.it

Ray Carey:

 

"When I introduced the PhD thesis of ELFA project member Niina Hynninen (read the intro here), I outlined some considerations for studying language regulation when English is spoken as a lingua franca.

 

[In this post: ] I go deeper into her data and findings on four areas of language regulation. First, what kind of overt comments do ELF users make on the quality of their/others’ English? Second, what kind of explicit corrections are made in their talk? Then I move on to more subtle forms of language regulation: instances where reformulations are embedded in a second speaker’s utterance (“embedded repairs”) and reformulations involving third-party intervention (“mediation”)."

Shona Whyte's insight:

(How) do people correct each other's language outside the classroom?

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