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Teacher Education for Languages with Technology / Formation des enseignants de langue avec les TICE
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L2 interactional competences: 2017 conference

L2 interactional competences: 2017 conference | TELT | Scoop.it
Under the heading ‘L2 interactional competences and practices in a second language’ (ICOP-L2), this conference brings together researchers from various horizons (e.g. linguistics, education, sociology) who investigate how people engage in second language talk-in-interaction: What are the basic ingredients of L2 interactional competence? How does such competence vary across situations and over time? How do L2 speakers use the linguistic resources at their disposal to accomplish social actions in coordination with others? How do linguistic and other resources (gaze, gesture, posture) work together in L2 talk? How does social interaction structure learning processes and learning products? How can L2 interactional competence and learning through interaction be addressed in educational contexts?  These are among the questions that will be tackled during the conference.
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CfP May 2016
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Book Now Hotel with cheap rate near Tajmahal on http://www.hotelatagra.com 
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Complex systems & applied linguistics: Larsen-Freeman & Cameron, 2008 (review)

Complex systems & applied linguistics: Larsen-Freeman & Cameron, 2008 (review) | TELT | Scoop.it
Complex Systems and Applied Linguistics by Diane Larsen-Freeman and Lynne Cameron. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008, 287 pp. Review by Brian Ellis University of California, Los Angeles In their book Complex Systems and Applied Linguistics, Diane Larsen- Freeman and Lynne Cameron argue that language is a complex adaptive system. As they describe, complex adaptive systems of all types share several features in common. They are made up of aggregates of diverse elements or agents that interact locally and which may form interconnected subsystems. They are dynamic, in a constant state of change. Their processes are non-linear, sensitive to initial condi- tions, controlled from the bottom up, and abide by a predictable unpredictability (sometimes referred to as chaos). They are open, not closed systems, which means their complexity is sustained far from equilibrium by input (of energy or informa- tion) into that system. They adapt in response to changes in their environment. Finally, this environment or context is not separate from the system but part of it. In all of these ways, language is a complex adaptive system, but this book goes a great deal beyond simply making that point. First, the authors develop complex- ity theory as a metaphor for language. They then address each of the main topics of research in applied linguistics through the lens of this metaphor. Along the way, they exemplify the practical use of the complexity metaphor by re-analyzing empirical data from past research. The first three chapters review complexity theory and form a road map for applying complexity theory as a metaphor in language research. The remaining chapters then put this framework to use by reinterpreting data from research in all the core areas of applied linguistics - language acquisition, second language learn- ing, language testing and foreign language instruction. Furthermore, the authors do a tremendous job relating complexity theory to numerous other fields of research, from formal linguistics to conversation analysis, synthesizing their own coherent view in the process. Without presenting themselves as overtly critical of alternative perspectives, the authors strongly favor a discourse-centered approach that utilizes complexity theory to better understand and model language dynamics. Chapter 1 introduces the reader to a complexity perspective. The main idea is that the world is not composed of ‘things’ but of perceived stabilities that emerge from complex system dynamics. From this perspective, language is an open, con- tinually evolving complex system. Chapter 2 summarizes the defining characteristics of complex systems, while chapter 3 identifies types and trajectories of change that occur in them (covering such oddities as strange attractors). For language scholars unfamiliar with but interested in learning more about complexity theory, this book Issues in Applied Linguistics © 2008, Regents of the University of California ISSN 1050-4273 Vol. 16 No. 2, 197-198
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Cited by Daniel Véronique in response to Lowie's presentation on CDST - pedagogical implications

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Target language use | The Language Gym

Target language use | The Language Gym | TELT | Scoop.it
Posts about Target language use written by Gianfranco Conti, Phd (Lang. Ed.), MA (TEFL)
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Some arguments for using L1 in the language classroom

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How does mother tongue affect second language acquisition?

How does mother tongue affect second language acquisition? | TELT | Scoop.it
A new study is exploring how a person’s native language can influence the way the brain processes auditory words in a second language.

 

Annie Tremblay: [C]ues, such as intonation, are harder to master and are more likely to be influenced by a speaker’s native language. Tremblay points to English where a stressed syllable is a strong indication that a new word is beginning. But in French the opposite is true; prominent syllables tend to be at the end of words.

 

“This kind of information can’t be memorized in a language such as French. It has to be computed. And this is where second language learners struggle,” Tremblay said.

 

An example of confusion is the French phrase for cranky cat, which in French is “chat grincheux.” For a brief second, the phrase can sound like the English pronunciation for “chagrin,” a word with French origins.

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Research behind this Language Magazine article paywalled here

Differential contribution of prosodic cues in the native and non-native segmentation of French speech

http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/lp.2012.3.issue-2/lp-2012-0018/lp-2012-0018.xml

 

 

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ANGLISH: Anne Tortel, 2008

ANGLISH: Anne Tortel, 2008 | TELT | Scoop.it

Base de donnéescomparatives de l’anglais lu, répété et parlé en L1 & L2 

 

63 locuteurs :

GB : 23 locuteurs, 13 femmes et 10 hommes, britanniques anglais ;

FR2: 20 locuteurs, 10 étudiantes et 10 étudiants anglicistes, fin de 2ème/début 3ème année ;

FR1: 20 locuteurs, 10 femmes et 10 hommes en activité ayant niveau Bac anglais L2.

 

Le corpus ANGLISH est en libre accès sur le Centre de Ressources pour la Description de l’Oral (CRDO) <http://crdo.fr.>

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Where Is the Native Speaker Now? - Cook - 2015 - TESOL Quarterly

Where Is the Native Speaker Now? - Cook - 2015 - TESOL Quarterly | TELT | Scoop.it

Vivian Cook Article first published online: 25 NOV 2015 DOI: 10.1002/tesq.286 © 2015 TESOL International Association

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4 pages on multicompetence model and its impact on second language research. I think it's open access, perhaps just while it's recent

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Cognition as a dynamic system: Smith 2005

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"...cognition just is an event in time, the emergent product of many heterogeneous systems bound to each other and to the world in real time. Developmental change must reside in the real time changes—in the accrual of changes that happen in the system or the order of milliseconds and seconds—that emerge in this real time activity. These are the core ideas of dynamic systems theory: emergence of new forms in time as a consequence of many decentralized and local interactions. We may have to abandon some old constructs if we are fully to understand the temporal coupling of cognition to the body, to the world, and to other social entities."  Cited by Wander Lowie at Acedle seminar on emergentism

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Research shows grammar syllabus can't work: Geoff Jordan

Research shows grammar syllabus can't work: Geoff Jordan | TELT | Scoop.it

Geoff Jordan: "[In] most English language teaching […] students are led through units of a coursebook, spending much of the time working on isolated linguistic structures and carefully-controlled vocabulary in a sequence which is externally predetermined and imposed on them by the textbook writer.

 

BUT

Research suggests that interlanguage development progresses in stages and that it’s impossible to alter stage order or to make learners skip stages. Thus, teachability is constrained by learnability and any coursebook-driven syllabus which attempts to impose an external linguistic syllabus on learners is futile: learning happens in spite of and not because of the course design.

 

Futile because

[According to Mike Long] : "Controlling grammar, vocabulary and sentence length results in a limited source of target-language use upon which learners must rely in order to learn the code. The often tiny samples are worked and reworked in class, whether practiced until rote-memorized, milked meta-linguistically, or both, and learners are expected to learn the full language on the basis of access to such limited data”.

Shona Whyte's insight:

I just reblogged this; it's worth following the links in the original post, and taking a look round Jordan's blog for further arguments.

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L1 use in the L2 classroom: Pemberton 2011

Talk for MA TESOL class, University of Nottingham
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Nice set of slides about using target language in the classroom, with good list of references at the end.

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Fonctions de la traduction en didactique des langues-cultures : Christian Puren

Fonctions de la traduction en didactique des langues-cultures : Christian Puren | TELT | Scoop.it
Article de 2012 qui revisite une publication de 1995 sur la traduction en classe de langue avec des exemples de pratiques de traduction et leurs fonctions pour l'apprentissage et l'enseignement.
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Comme Vivian Cook, Christian Puren prend position contre l'utilisation exclusive de la langue cible et attaque un rapport européen récent selon lequel : "la recherche scientifique suggère que plus le bain linguistique est important, meilleure est la maîtrise de la langue apprise." 

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