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Teacher Education for Languages with Technology / Formation des enseignants de langue avec les TICE
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Collaborative poetry translation: Park, 2016

Although translation is part of the bilingual experiences of English language learners, literacy teachers and teacher educators know little about how translation can be used with high school - aged English language learners and with what affordances. Based on discour se data collected from a mixed - grade (grades 11 and 12) sheltered English class in an urban high school, this paper reports on the impact of Poetry Inside Out, a literacy program in which students translate world - class poems from their original language (e .g., Spanish, French, Chinese, etc.) into English. Findings suggest that participation in poetry translation and in structured discussions about poetry and translation can foster students’ semantic awareness; capacity for evidence - based reasoning; and thei r willingness to listen to and learn from classmates. The study’s findings speak to the potential of Poetry Inside Out as a program which recruits English language learners’ emergent bi - and multilingualism as a resource.
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Article in Journal of Language and Literacy Education http://jolle.coe.uga.edu (University of Georgia)
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Target language use | The Language Gym

Target language use | The Language Gym | TELT | Scoop.it
Posts about Target language use written by Gianfranco Conti, Phd (Lang. Ed.), MA (TEFL)
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Some arguments for using L1 in the language classroom

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Teachers’ Classroom Language Use: Rabbidge & Chappell 2014

The teaching of English as a foreign language in South Korean public schools has seen the implementation of a number of new innovations. One such innovation, the teaching of English through English, dubbed TETE, is a government-initiated policy that requires public schools to teach English by only using English. Nevertheless, studies reveal that teachers are not implementing the policy. The current study, through a series of observations and interviews, ascertained that teachers were not implementing the government policy at the elementary-school level due to a conflict in government decrees, making it difficult for them to teach English by only using English while maintaining student motivation to learn English. The study reveals the importance that teachers place on the belief that motivation needs to be maintained at all costs, even superseding the need to maximize target language exposure. The paper calls for further studies of teachers who have established techniques to maintain student motivations for learning the target language while teaching exclusively in the target language, as well as touching upon the idea of the need for an alternative to the TETE policy.

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Interesting analysis of classroom use of L1 and TL by Korean elementary school teachers, who seem to be resisting official guidelines by using L1 to maintain motivation.

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Behind Classroom Code Switching: Layering and Language Choice in L2 Learner Interaction | Hancock McDonald ELT

Behind Classroom Code Switching: Layering and Language Choice in L2 Learner Interaction | Hancock McDonald ELT | TELT | Scoop.it
TESOL Quarterly vol 31, No 2. Summer 1997Mark Hancock

 

This article examines the code switching that goes on during group work in language classes in which the learners share an L1. The author argues that the discourse produced in these circumstances is layered as a result of the participants' oscillating between a literal and a nonliteral frame (Goffman, 1974). Discourse produced in the literal frame is termed off-record and is concerned with negotiation between the learners. Discourse in the literal frame is on-record and is performed to be overheard by a referee (a potential L2 audience). The author suggests that the significance of language choice behaviour differs across these two levels, and teachers concerned with increasing the quantity and quality of L2 production in group work must take this difference into account.

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Codeswitching in the second language classroom - L1 or L2, when and why?

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The return of translation: opportunities and pitfalls

The return of translation: opportunities and pitfalls | TELT | Scoop.it

For most of the 20th century, there was a deep-rooted tradition in the ELT, which dates back to the Direct Method, that L1 in the classroom should be avoided at all costs. Although there were some alternative methods, such as Community Language learning (aka ‘counsel-learning’) and Dodson’s Bilingual Method, which made use of the learners’ L1 and used translation, most ELT methods of the last century were clearly ‘target-language’ only and some even went as far as to take a clearly anti-L1 stance in order to avoid interference.

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Quick history of the place of L1 in EFL teaching methodologies, and some ideas for using translation in class if you are so moved

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How does mother tongue affect second language acquisition?

How does mother tongue affect second language acquisition? | TELT | Scoop.it
A new study is exploring how a person’s native language can influence the way the brain processes auditory words in a second language.

 

Annie Tremblay: [C]ues, such as intonation, are harder to master and are more likely to be influenced by a speaker’s native language. Tremblay points to English where a stressed syllable is a strong indication that a new word is beginning. But in French the opposite is true; prominent syllables tend to be at the end of words.

 

“This kind of information can’t be memorized in a language such as French. It has to be computed. And this is where second language learners struggle,” Tremblay said.

 

An example of confusion is the French phrase for cranky cat, which in French is “chat grincheux.” For a brief second, the phrase can sound like the English pronunciation for “chagrin,” a word with French origins.

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Research behind this Language Magazine article paywalled here

Differential contribution of prosodic cues in the native and non-native segmentation of French speech

http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/lp.2012.3.issue-2/lp-2012-0018/lp-2012-0018.xml

 

 

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L1 use in the L2 classroom: Pemberton 2011

Talk for MA TESOL class, University of Nottingham
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Nice set of slides about using target language in the classroom, with good list of references at the end.

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Fonctions de la traduction en didactique des langues-cultures : Christian Puren

Fonctions de la traduction en didactique des langues-cultures : Christian Puren | TELT | Scoop.it
Article de 2012 qui revisite une publication de 1995 sur la traduction en classe de langue avec des exemples de pratiques de traduction et leurs fonctions pour l'apprentissage et l'enseignement.
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Comme Vivian Cook, Christian Puren prend position contre l'utilisation exclusive de la langue cible et attaque un rapport européen récent selon lequel : "la recherche scientifique suggère que plus le bain linguistique est important, meilleure est la maîtrise de la langue apprise." 

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