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Teacher Education for Languages with Technology / Formation des enseignants de langue avec les TICE
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Behind Classroom Code Switching: Layering and Language Choice in L2 Learner Interaction | Hancock McDonald ELT

Behind Classroom Code Switching: Layering and Language Choice in L2 Learner Interaction | Hancock McDonald ELT | TELT | Scoop.it
TESOL Quarterly vol 31, No 2. Summer 1997Mark Hancock

 

This article examines the code switching that goes on during group work in language classes in which the learners share an L1. The author argues that the discourse produced in these circumstances is layered as a result of the participants' oscillating between a literal and a nonliteral frame (Goffman, 1974). Discourse produced in the literal frame is termed off-record and is concerned with negotiation between the learners. Discourse in the literal frame is on-record and is performed to be overheard by a referee (a potential L2 audience). The author suggests that the significance of language choice behaviour differs across these two levels, and teachers concerned with increasing the quantity and quality of L2 production in group work must take this difference into account.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Codeswitching in the second language classroom - L1 or L2, when and why?

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Cracking the code: listening using "wrong lyrics" (Mark Hancock)

Cracking the code: listening using "wrong lyrics" (Mark Hancock) | TELT | Scoop.it

Carolyn Kerr's ELT blog post on listening problems (with French L1 learners):

 

Certain sounds emerged as common problem areas:

/n/ – all of the learners – ‘some flowers’ – ‘sun flowers’

/ʤ/ – five of the learners – ‘jeep’ – ‘cheap’

/ɑ:/ – five of the learners – ‘hat’ – ‘heart’

/h/ – five of the learners – ‘ill’ – ‘hill’

 

If anyone has any insights or observations around these clusters of problem sounds in terms of sound reception I’d be very glad to hear about it! They seem to be ‘typical’ problem sounds for French speakers but I’d love to know more if anyone has any ideas.

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