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Teacher Education for Languages with Technology / Formation des enseignants de langue avec les TICE
Curated by Shona Whyte
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Academic publishing and the myth of linguistic injustice: Hyland, 2016

Abstract

Academic publication now dominates the lives of academics across the globe who must increasingly submit their research for publication in high profile English language journals to move up the career ladder. The dominance of English in academic publishing, however, has raised questions of communicative inequality and the possible ‘linguistic injustice’ against an author's mother tongue. Native English speakers are thought to have an advantage as they acquire the language naturalistically while second language users must invest more time, effort and money into formally learning it and may experience greater difficulties when writing in English. Attitude surveys reveal that English as an Additional Language authors often believe that editors and referees are prejudiced against them for any non-standard language. In this paper, I critically review the evidence for linguistic injustice through a survey of the literature and interviews with scholars working in Hong Kong. I argue that framing publication problems as a crude Native vs non-Native polarization not only draws on an outmoded respect for ‘Native speaker’ competence but serves to demoralizes EAL writers and marginalize the difficulties experienced by novice L1 English academics. The paper, then, is a call for a more inclusive and balanced view of academic publishing.

Shona Whyte's insight:

That outmoded native-nonnative distinction again ...

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Englishes in Practice: Jenkins, 2015

Englishes in Practice: Jenkins, 2015 | TELT | Scoop.it

In the relatively few years since empirical research into English as a Lingua Franca began being conducted more widely, the field has developed and expanded remarkably, and in myriad ways. In particular, researchers have explored ELF from the perspective of a range of linguistic levels and in an ever-increasing number of sociolinguistic contexts, as well as its synergies with the field of Intercultural Communication and its meaning for the fields of Second Language Acquisition and English as a Foreign Language. The original orientation to ELF communication focused heavily, if not exclusively, on form. In light of increasing empirical evidence, this gave way some years later to an understanding that it is the processes underlying these forms that are paramount, and hence to a focus on ELF users and ELF as social practice. It is argued in this article, however, that ELF is in need of further retheorisation in respect of its essentially multilingual nature: a nature that has always been present in ELF theory and empirical work, but which, I believe, has not so far been sufficiently foregrounded. This article therefore attempts to redress the balance by taking ELF theorisation a small step further in its evolution.

Shona Whyte's insight:

New article by Jennifer Jenkins, open access

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Minimal pairs - 'ELF priorities'

Minimal pairs - 'ELF priorities' | TELT | Scoop.it
It can be hard to know what to focus on when it comes to pronunciation, especially if you have a group for a short time or there's a wide range of needs. One of the great things about adopting an E...
Shona Whyte's insight:

Lots of ideas for working on minimal pairs, with links to resources and explanations.

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Murielle Godement's curator insight, November 11, 2014 1:26 PM

Des pistes pour travailler la prononciation à adapter au primaire.

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Get involved with a fun accents project!

Get involved with a fun accents project! | TELT | Scoop.it
All you need to do is record yourself saying “This is how I say potato and I come from…” and post it to this website. The idea of the project is to map the different ways ‘potato’ is pronounced across the world, and it comes from the legendary David...
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TED talks: beyond coursebook accents

TED talks: beyond coursebook accents | TELT | Scoop.it
Do you ever use TED talks in your classes? This nonprofit organisation, with the tagline ‘Ideas worth spreading’, is a great place to find interesting authentic audio.
Shona Whyte's insight:

Nice selection of different accents for awareness raising or teacher education

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Nedi Silveira's curator insight, September 28, 2014 12:59 AM

Wonderful and inspiring talks.

Ramon Gomes's curator insight, November 22, 2014 7:29 PM

This is the best programme for talks ever!!!

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ELF corpora in the mainstream: notes from the ICAME 35 conference

ELF corpora in the mainstream: notes from the ICAME 35 conference | TELT | Scoop.it
Nottingham Castle, the site of the conference excursion dinner.
Shona Whyte's insight:

Ray Carey describes a number of ongoing EFL projects in northern Europe.

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Computer-assisted Video Communication in the Primary EFL Classroom:...

Computer-assisted Video Communication in the Primary EFL Classroom: A German-French Exchange Euline Cutrim Schmid & Shona Whyte Paper presented at the 2. Bu...
Shona Whyte's insight:

Ongoing research into technology-mediated live communication in the young beginners EFL classroom.

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VOICE - ELF sound archive

VOICE - ELF sound archive | TELT | Scoop.it

In the early 21st century, English in the world finds itself in an “unstable equilibrium”: On the one hand, the majority of the world's English users are not native speakers of the language, but use it as an additional language, as a convenient means for communicative interactions that cannot be conducted in their mother tongues. On the other hand, linguistic descriptions have as yet predominantly been focusing on English as it is spoken and written by its native speakers.

 

VOICE seeks to redress the balance by providing a sizeable, computer-readable corpus of English as it is spoken by this non-native speaking majority of users in different contexts. These speakers use English successfully on a daily basis all over the world, in their personal, professional or academic lives. We therefore see them primarily not as language learners but as language users in their own right. It is therefore clearly worth finding out just how they use the language. This is exactly what VOICE seeks to make possible.

 

The VOICE project as such ran from 2005 to 2013, see News

Shona Whyte's insight:

Corpus of authentic ELF audio recordings with close transcription.

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nicolaperry's curator insight, January 12, 2014 6:29 AM

Too many learners still think they have to aim for native speaker models. Too many teachers are not aware that the standard English they teach is not the only acceptable English. These recordings were collected as part of a major research project into International English / English as a Lingua Franca (ELF). 

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Research in English as a lingua franca: Jenkins, Cogo & Dewey, 2011

Shona Whyte's insight:

Some quotes:

- "native English pronunciation is not optimum in ELF communication contexts."  

- ELF refers to "an additionally acquired language system which serves as a common means of communication for speakers of different first languages" (this definition includes native speakers of English; VOICE, Seidelhofer).  

- ELF users "are not the ‘failed native speakers’ of EFL, but – more often – highly skilled communicators who make use of their multilingual resources in ways not available to monolingual NSEs, and who are found to prioritize successful communication over narrow notions of ‘correctness’ in ways that NSEs, with their stronger attachment to their native English, may find more challenging." 

- Jenkins research showed "certain English pronunciation features (essentially consonant sounds apart from the dental fricatives /T/ and /D/, initial consonant clusters, vowel length distinctions, and nuclear stress) contributed significantly to intelligibility in the ELF interactions being studied. On the other hand, they showed that certain other features (e.g. weak forms, elisions, assimilations) did not appear to contribute to intelligibility in these interactions and may

even have detracted from it"

- call for awareness raising and action research

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English as an Academic Lingua Franca

As a result of globalization, higher education institutions throughout the world are adopting English for parts of their education.
Shona Whyte's insight:

Read Chapter 1, Beyza Bjorkman, 2013 http://www.degruyter.com/view/product/181530

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When in Rome: thoughts from the ELF6 conference

When in Rome: thoughts from the ELF6 conference | TELT | Scoop.it
I returned this week from Rome, where I attended the 6th annual conference of English as a lingua franca (ELF6) held at Roma Tre University. I'm not much of a conference lover, so it helps when the...
Shona Whyte's insight:

Ray Carey reports on the recent English as a Lingua Franca conference in Rome, with links to abstracts from presentations.

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Matthew Absalom's comment, September 17, 2013 5:37 AM
I love your description of the IC stuff - so spot on... Palatino any day!