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Teacher Education for Languages with Technology / Formation des enseignants de langue avec les TICE
Curated by Shona Whyte
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Teaching languages with technology: book preview

Teaching languages with technology: book preview | TELT | Scoop.it
Shona Whyte's insight:

Bloombury have posted an excerpt of our edited volume on communicative approaches to interactive whiteboard use.  Read Jozef Colpaert's foreword and some of my introductory chapter.

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Through the lens of communicativeness: Hana Ticha

Through the lens of communicativeness: Hana Ticha | TELT | Scoop.it

Hana Ticha: "I usually judge activities based on their purposefulness and effectiveness. Honestly, I take it for granted that my activities are communicative, but are they really? Here's one of my favourite techniques called 'running dictation', which I find motivating, enjoyable and meaningful. I'm attaching a short video to demonstrate what we actually do (I'm publishing it here with written consent from the students' parents). I'm going to try to analyze it to see how communicative the whole thing is."

Shona Whyte's insight:

Response to Kevin Stein's post on CLT http://sco.lt/8HosHh

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Vocabulary learning in pair versus small group work: Fernández Dobao, 2014

Learners working in groups of four produced more lexical LREs [Language Related Episodes, i.e., discussions of vocabulary] than those workings in pairs and were also significantly more successful at solving them.

 

The qualitative analysis of the LREs showed that groups were more likely to achieve a correct solution to their problems because they shared more lexical knowledge, since up to four different learners could pool their individual knowledge and resources to solve each problem.

 

Although a larger number of participants represents more resources, it also means fewer opportunities to speak. […] LREs were relatively often solved by two or three of the members of the group while the others participated as observers. However, this did not have a significant impact on learners’ rate of retention of the lexical knowledge co-constructed in the LRE […O]n average, learners working in small groups were as likely to retain the lexical items discussed in their interaction as those working in pairs.

 

Since groups produced significantly more lexical LREs than pairs and, in particular, more correctly resolved LREs, this means that overall small group interaction resulted in more instances of L2 vocabulary learning than pair interaction. 

Shona Whyte's insight:

Very interesting, carefully controlled large-scale study of US undergraduate anglophone learners of Spanish with a (rare) practical implication for the second language classroom: prefer small group work over group work because pooled resources lead to more learning for all.  [Thanks to the author for sharing]

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Swan, 1985: A critical look at the communicative approach

Swan, M. (1985). A critical look at the communicative approach (1). ELT journal,39(1), 2-12. [open access]

Shona Whyte's insight:

Criticism of CLT by Michael Swan who refutes a number of arguments using quotes from Widdowson and Candlin among others.  

 

Top quote: "Foreigners have mother tongues: they know as much as we do about how human beings communicate."

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Tacking the L in SLA: Geoff Jordan

Tacking the L in SLA: Geoff Jordan | TELT | Scoop.it
After the fun of the Eleven Questions, here are my suggestion for serious ones. 1. Does a theory of SLA need a property theory? In other words: In order to give a full explanation of  SLA, must we ...
Shona Whyte's insight:

Jordan's view of what matters, what should be pursued and what can be safely ignored in second language teaching and learning.

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Interaction in the target language at the IWB | itilt.eu

Interaction in the target language at the IWB | itilt.eu | TELT | Scoop.it

When we discuss the use of interactive whiteboards in education, we often assume that the mere use of interactive technologies will ensure that classroom teaching and learning will also become somehow "interactive." This might mean physical activity on the part of learners - as in Dewey and Bruner's learning by doing, or Asher's Total Physical Response - but in the second language classroom, we more naturally think of interaction in the target language.  So we might expect that using an interactive whiteboard should promote interaction in terms of communication between the teacher and learners, and among learners.

 

Communicative language teaching (CLT), involving meaningful use of language, and task-based language teaching (TBLT) are, of course, the main current approaches to second language teaching and learning, and so it is helpful to see examples of classroom activities where the IWB is used to support spontaneous, unplanned communication in authentic contexts.  However, this type of communication is not always possible or indeed desirable at all stages of proficiency and in all phases of a lesson or longer teaching unit.  In the following examples, we can see the IWB being used to support different types of language interaction, from the practice of decontextualised language elements in order to focus on pronunciation or grammar, through more open-ended activities, to genuine communication in the target language.

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Shona Whyte's curator insight, April 12, 2013 6:11 AM

Pistes pour l'exploitation du site iTILT en formation.

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Methods | frenchteacher.net

Approaches to second language teaching

Shona Whyte's insight:

Quick and dirty guide to 20th century second language teaching methods from Steve Smith.

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“Flipped” foreign language classrooms

Shona Whyte:


The more I hear about the flipped classroom, the more I think "this is what we've been doing in language teaching for years."

 

Or at least this is what communicative and task-based approaches aimed to do to grammar-oriented language classes.

 

Judging from this article by Pedro Maligo of the Department of Modern and Classical Languages at Columbus State University, I am not alone in these views.


Via Yuly Asencion
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Foreign Language Teaching Methods: University of Texas at Austin

Foreign Language Teaching Methods: University of Texas at Austin | TELT | Scoop.it
"Professional development modules for foreign language instruction at the high-school and college levels."

Excellent resources for teacher training, including lecture material, classroom illustrations, and references for further study. See Carl Blyth on communicative teaching or Elaine Horowitz on motivation.
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Stephen Krashen on Language Acquisition: Input and the affective filter

A 15 minute excerpt from a television lecture by Stephen Krashen on second language acquisition, recorded in the late 1980s. 

 

The Monitor Model in a nutshell: "we acquire language when we get comprehensible input in a low-anxiety environment."  The input hypothesis, the silent period, the affective filter, all presented in non-technical language using low-tech props.

 

Many communicative language proponents would still go along with much of what Krashen has to say; take away the reference to Chomsky's LAD (language acquisition device) and add a little focus on form and we're not so far from contemporary second language teaching methodology.


Via Csilla Jaray-Benn
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