TeKeeG
214 views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by AdnanD from Science-Videos
onto TeKeeG
Scoop.it!

Full Documentary SINGULARITY [2013] Rise of the Machines with Ray Kurzweil and Stephen Hawking

You watched an YouTube Original HBO - Hello Beiber Orifice; a Film By Justin Beiber; a Stephen Hawcking Production, in association with Ray Kurzweil Pictures.


Via Belinda Suvaal, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
AdnanD's insight:

Never Mock the Hawk 

more...
Belinda Suvaal's curator insight, August 5, 2013 5:46 AM

VI - 2029, the 6th paradigm:  3D selforganizing molecular circuits (already working in labs, underway commercially). The cyborg will will save humanity from the nature-nurture debate, says Kurzweill (Singularity Is Near)..

Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by AdnanD from Longevity science
Scoop.it!

Breast tissue provides clues to avoid effects of aging

Breast tissue provides clues to avoid effects of aging | TeKeeG | Scoop.it
Our tissue's inability to repair itself as we grow older is thought to correlate with the decline in the presence of stem cells. So it follows that if stem cell function can be preserved beyond the norm, it could have implications for the aging process and adverse effects of tissue degeneration, such as cancer.

 

Scientists from the University of Toronto have followed this line of thinking through research on the mammary glands of genetically modified mice, finding that development of the tissue can be manipulated to avoid the effects of aging.


Via Ray and Terry's
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by AdnanD from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Scientists create invisible objects in the microwave range without metamaterial cloaking

Scientists create invisible objects in the microwave range without metamaterial cloaking | TeKeeG | Scoop.it
Physicists have managed to make homogenous cylindrical objects completely invisible in the microwave range. Contrary to the now prevailing notion of invisibility that relies on metamaterial coatings, the scientists achieved the result using a homogenous object without any additional coating layers. The method is based on a new understanding of electromagnetic wave scattering.

 

The scientists studied light scattering from a glass cylinder filled with water. In essence, such an experiment represents a two-dimensional analog of a classical problem of scattering from a homogeneous sphere (Mie scattering), the solution to which is known for almost a century. However, this classical problem contains unusual physics that manifests itself when materials with high values of refractive index are involved. In the study, the scientists used ordinary water whose refractive index can be regulated by changing temperature.


As it turned out, high refractive index is associated with two scattering mechanisms: resonant scattering, which is related to the localization of light inside the cylinder, and non-resonant, which is characterized by smooth dependence on the wave frequency. The interaction between these mechanisms is referred to as Fano resonances. The researchers discovered that at certain frequencies waves scattered via resonant and non-resonant mechanisms have opposite phases and are mutually destroyed, thus making the object invisible.


The work led to the first experimental observation of an invisible homogeneous object by means of scattering cancellation. Importantly, the developed technique made it possible to switch from visibility to invisibility regimes at the same frequency of 1.9 GHz by simply changing the temperature of the water in the cylinder from 90 °C to 50 °C.


"Our theoretical calculations were successfully tested in microwave experiments. What matters is that the invisibility idea we implemented in our work can be applied to other electromagnetic wave ranges, including to the visible range. Materials with corresponding refractive index are either long known or can be developed at will," said Mikhail Rybin, first author of the paper and senior researcher at the Metamaterials Laboratory in ITMO University.


The discovery of invisibility phenomenon in a homogenous object and not an object covered with additional coating layers is also important from the engineering point of view. Because it is much easier to produce a homogeneous cylinder, the discovery could prompt further development of nanoantennas, wherein invisible structural elements could help reduce disturbances. For instance, invisible rods could be used as supports for a miniature antenna complex connecting two optical chips.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by AdnanD
Scoop.it!

Living for 1,000 years: an 'out of this world' future awaits us

Living for 1,000 years: an 'out of this world' future awaits us | TeKeeG | Scoop.it
... already been born got me thinking. What might life be like in this long-range future? Will boredom set in as we count the centuries; or will what promises to be an incredible technology-rich life keep the excitement alive?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by AdnanD
Scoop.it!

13 Emerging Nanotechnologies and Next Generation Materials ...

13 Emerging Nanotechnologies and Next Generation Materials ... | TeKeeG | Scoop.it
Policy Horizons Canada worked with futurist and data visualizer Michell Zappa of Envisioning to produce a report called MetaScan 3: Emerging Technologies and accompanying infographics. We are reproducing the summary for emerging nano ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by AdnanD
Scoop.it!

12-Year Old Child Reveals One of the Best Kept Secrets in the World - YouTube

12-year old exposes the immorality of the global banking system and why sound money is essential to freedom and stopping the spread of misery on this planet.
AdnanD's insight:

It's shameful how light is dimmed upon those who shine

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by AdnanD
Scoop.it!

Direct brain-to-brain communication demonstrated in human subjects

Direct brain-to-brain communication demonstrated in human subjects | TeKeeG | Scoop.it
In a first-of-its-kind study, an international team of neuroscientists and robotics engineers has demonstrated the viability of direct brain-to-brain communication in humans.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by AdnanD from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Researchers Grow Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with Identical Electronic Properties

Researchers Grow Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with Identical Electronic Properties | TeKeeG | Scoop.it

Using custom-made organic precursor molecules, researchers have succeeded for the first time in growing single-walled carbon nanotubes with identical electronic properties.


In future, it will be possible to specifically equip carbon nanotubes with properties which they need for electronic applications, for example. Researchers at Empa in Dübendorf/Switzerland and the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart have succeeded for the first time in growing single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with only a single, prespecified structure. The nanotubes thereby have identical electronic properties. The decisive trick here: The team has taken up an idea which originated from the Stuttgart-based Max Planck researchers and produced the CNT from custom-made organic precursor molecules. The researchers started with these precursor molecules and have built up the nanotubes on a platinum surface, as they report in the latest issue of the scientific journal Nature. Such CNTs could be used in future, for instance, in ultra-sensitive light detectors and very tiny transistors.

 

For 20 years, material scientists working on the development of carbon nanotubes for a range of applications have been battling a problem – now an elegant solution is at hand. With their unusual mechanical, thermal and electronic properties, the tiny tubes with their honeycomb lattice of graphitic carbon have become the embodiment of nanomaterials. They could be used to manufacture the next generation of electronic and electro-optical components so that they are even smaller and with even faster switching times than before. But to achieve this, the material scientists must specifically equip the nanotubes with desired properties, and these depend on their structure. The production methods used to date, however, always result in a mixture of different CNTs. The team from Empa and the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research has now remedied the situation with a new production path for single-walled nanotubes.


The researchers have thus proved that they can unambiguously specify the growth and thus the structure of long SWCNTs using custom-made molecular seeds. The SWCNTs synthesized in this study can exist in two forms, which correspond to an object and its mirror image. By choosing the precursor molecule appropriately, the researchers were able to influence which of the two variants forms. Depending on how the honeycomb atomic lattice is derived from the original molecule – straight or oblique with respect to the CNT axis – it is also possible for helically wound tubes, i.e. with right- or left-handed rotation, and with non-mirror symmetry to form. And it is precisely this structure that then determines which electronic, thermo-electric and optical properties of the material. In principle, the researchers can therefore specifically produce materials with different properties through their choice of precursor molecule.

 

In further steps, Roman Fasel and his colleagues want to gain an even better understanding of how SWCNTs establish themselves on a surface. Even if well in excess of 100 million nanotubes per square centimeter already grow on the platinum surface, only a relatively small fraction of the seeds actually develop into «mature» nanotubes. The question remains as to which processes are responsible for this, and how the yield can be increased.

 

Publication: Juan Ramon Sanchez-Valencia, et al., “Controlled Synthesis of Single-Chirality Carbon Nanotubes,” Nature 512, 61–64 (07 August 2014) doi:10.1038/nature13607

 
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by AdnanD
Scoop.it!

Potential for 'in body' muscle regeneration, rodent study suggests

Potential for 'in body' muscle regeneration, rodent study suggests | TeKeeG | Scoop.it
What if repairing large segments of damaged muscle tissue was as simple as mobilizing the body’s stem cells to the site of the injury? New research in mice and rats suggests that “in body” regeneration of muscle tissue might be possible by harnessing the body’s natural healing powers.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by AdnanD from Longevity science
Scoop.it!

New algorithm identifies weak spots in body tissue prior to injury

New algorithm identifies weak spots in body tissue prior to injury | TeKeeG | Scoop.it
Muscle and tendon strains or tears may soon be detectable prior to injury, thanks to new algorithms developed by researchers at Washington University in St ...

Via Ray and Terry's
more...
Ray and Terry's 's curator insight, September 2, 2014 2:45 PM

When it comes to muscle, tendon, and bone injuries, early diagnosis can save you from a world of hurt and lengthy rehabilitation. Researchers at Washington University in St Louis have developed algorithms that may one day – after some refinement in imaging techniques – identify tiny strains before they turn into serious injuries.


The researchers combined mechanical engineering with image-analysis techniques to create the algorithms, one of which they measured as being 1,000 times more accurate than older methods at quantifying very large stretches near tiny cracks and tears. Another algorithm predicts where cracks are likely to form.

Rescooped by AdnanD from Pharma: Trends and Uses Of Mobile Apps and Digital Marketing
Scoop.it!

Pharma puts Watson brain to work to speed up R&D, cut drug development costs

Pharma puts Watson brain to work to speed up R&D, cut drug development costs | TeKeeG | Scoop.it
Johnson & Johnson and Sanofi are using IBM Watson’s computer brain/big data cruncher to support research and development.

Via Emmanuel Capitaine , Philippe Marchal, eMedToday
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by AdnanD from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Introducing the multi-tasking nanoparticle for diagnostic and therapeutic applications

Introducing the multi-tasking nanoparticle for diagnostic and therapeutic applications | TeKeeG | Scoop.it

Kit Lam and colleagues from UC Davis and other institutions have created dynamic nanoparticles (NPs) that could provide an arsenal of applications to diagnose and treat cancer. Built on an easy-to-make polymer, these particles can be used as contrast agents to light up tumors for MRI and PET scans or deliver chemo and other therapies to destroy tumors. In addition, the particles are biocompatible and have shown no toxicity. The study was published online today in Nature Communications.

 

“These are amazingly useful particles,” noted co-first author Yuanpei Li, a research faculty member in the Lam laboratory. “As a contrast agent, they make tumors easier to see on MRI and other scans. We can also use them as vehicles to deliver chemotherapy directly to tumors; apply light to make the nanoparticles release singlet oxygen (photodynamic therapy) or use a laser to heat them (photothermal therapy) – all proven ways to destroy tumors.”

 

Jessica Tucker, program director of Drug and Gene Delivery and Devices at the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, which is part of the National Institutes of Health, said the approach outlined in the study has the ability to combine both imaging and therapeutic applications in a single platform, which has been difficult to achieve, especially in an organic, and therefore biocompatible, vehicle.

 

"This is especially valuable in cancer treatment, where targeted treatment to tumor cells, and the reduction of lethal effects in normal cells, is so critical,” she added.

 

 Though not the first nanoparticles, these may be the most versatile. Other particles are good at some tasks but not others. Non-organic particles, such as quantum dots or gold-based materials, work well as diagnostic tools but have safety issues. Organic probes are biocompatible and can deliver drugs but lack imaging or phototherapy applications.

 

Built on a porphyrin/cholic acid polymer, the nanoparticles are simple to make and perform well in the body. Porphyrins are common organic compounds. Cholic acid is produced by the liver.

 

To further stabilize the particles, the researchers added the amino acid cysteine (creating CNPs), which prevents them from prematurely releasing their therapeutic payload when exposed to blood proteins and other barriers. At 32 nanometers, CNPs are ideally sized to penetrate tumors, accumulating among cancer cells while sparing healthy tissue.

 

In the study, the team tested the nanoparticles, both in vitro and in vivo, for a wide range of tasks. On the therapeutic side, CNPs effectively transported anti-cancer drugs, such as doxorubicin. Even when kept in blood for many hours, CNPs only released small amounts of the drug; however, when exposed to light or agents such as glutathione, they readily released their payloads. The ability to precisely control chemotherapy release inside tumors could greatly reduce toxicity. CNPs carrying doxorubicin provided excellent cancer control in animals, with minimal side effects.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Rescooped by AdnanD from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Chromatophagy, A New Cancer Therapy: Starve The Diseased Cell Until It Eats Its Own DNA

Chromatophagy, A New Cancer Therapy: Starve The Diseased Cell Until It Eats Its Own DNA | TeKeeG | Scoop.it

Nutritional starvation therapy is under intensive investigation because it provides a potentially lower toxicity with higher specificity than conventional cancer therapy. Autophagy, often triggered by starvation, represents an energy-saving, pro-survival cellular function; however, dysregulated autophagy could also lead to cell death, a process distinct from the classic caspase-dependent apoptosis.


A recent study shows how arginine starvation specifically kills tumor cells by a novel mechanism involving mitochondria dysfunction, reactive oxygen species generation, DNA leakage, and chromatin autophagy, where leaked DNA is captured by giant autophagosomes. 


Cells when stressed, whether cancerous or not, undergo a process of cellular suicide that involves controlled dismantling of its interior components such as proteins, DNA, and various compartments.  By far the most famous of such processes is “apoptosis”.  The authors in this study have found another, distinct process involving mitochondria dysfunction, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, DNA leakage, and chromatin autophagy.

 

The senior author, Professor Hsing-Jien Kung, both a cancer biology at UC Davis and  the Director of the National Health Research Institutes in Taipei, Taiwan, first discovered in 2009 the basic mechanism by which arginine shortage kills cancer cells.

 

“Traditional cancer therapies involve ‘poisoning‘ by toxic chemicals or ‘burning‘ by radiation cancer cells to death, which often have side effects,” according to Professor Kung. “An emerging strategy is to ‘starve’ cancer cells to death, taking advantage of the different metabolic requirements of normal and cancer cells. This approach is generally milder, but as this study illustrates, it also utilizes a different death mechanism, which may complement the killing effects of the conventional therapy.”



Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
AdnanD's insight:

The perseverance of man kind ! 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by AdnanD from Research
Scoop.it!

The next graphene? Engineers to study new class of ultra-thin film materials

The next graphene? Engineers to study new class of ultra-thin film materials | TeKeeG | Scoop.it

Three University of California, Riverside engineers are part of team recently awarded a nearly $1.7 million grant from the National Science Foundation to characterize, analyze and synthesize a new class of ultra-thin film materials that could improve the performance of personal electronics, optoelectronic devices and energy conversion systems.

The team is led by Alexander Balandin, University of California Presidential Chair in Electrical and Computer Engineering and founding chair of the materials science and engineering program at UC Riverside's Bourns College of Engineering. Other members of the team are Roger Lake, a UC Riverside professor, Alexander Khitun, a UC Riverside research professor, and Tina Salguero, an assistant professor at the University of Georgia.

The project targets a new class of materials, termed van der Waals materials, and heterostructures implemented with such materials. The ultra-thin materials may consist of just one atomic plane, which explains the term "two-dimensional" materials. The project will investigate novel electrical, optical, and thermal phenomena in such materials and heterostructures.


Via Alin Velea
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by AdnanD from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

Astronomers detect the building blocks of life in a distant star system | Chris Wood | GizMag.com

Astronomers detect the building blocks of life in a distant star system | Chris Wood | GizMag.com | TeKeeG | Scoop.it

Astronomers from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) have used the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to observe the protoplanetary disk surrounding a young star, revealing the presence of complex organic molecules that represent the building blocks of life. The findings mark the first time that such a discovery has been made.

The new observations focused on the star system MWC 480, located some 455 light-years from Earth. Just one million years old, the star is around twice the mass of the Sun, and is in the very early stages of development, having only recently emerged from a stellar womb of gas dust, and with no signs of planet formation yet detected.

The ALMA observations revealed large volumes of the complex, carbon-based molecule methyl cyanide, as well as hydrogen cyanide. They were found in the outer reaches of the star's disk – a region thought to be similar to the Kuiper Belt, which resides beyond the planets in our own Solar System.

The detected molecules contain carbon-nitrogen bonds essential in the formation of amino acids that are, in turn, the foundation of proteins. Through the study of comets, we know that similar molecules were present during the same stage of development in our own Solar System, and in similar concentrations observed in MWC 480's protoplanetary disk.

 

Click headline to read more and access hot links--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by AdnanD from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

If There Were a Secret Message, Where in the Human Genome Would You Hide It?

If There Were a Secret Message, Where in the Human Genome Would You Hide It? | TeKeeG | Scoop.it

When people think about SETI, the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, they imagine messages sent via radio—Jodie Foster tuning antennas, hoping to pick up signals from the “billions and billions” of star systems pondered by Carl Sagan. Potential extraterrestrials might be beaming out messages into space and all we need to do is listen for them. Of course, even using light—the fastest possible signal-carrier—we would still have to wait years for messages from even the closest stars to reach us. And that presumes that we are listening at just the right moment in the Universe’s 13.8-billion-year history. The odds that different civilizations across the galaxy overlap so precisely that we could listen right now to aliens’s messages could be quite low.

 

But there’s another potential way to send signals across the cosmos, albeit one that requires a great deal of patience and expertise: storing messages inside genetic material. Encoding a message in an organism or virus and then sending it on an interstellar voyage to other planets requires a long wait—it might take eons for intelligent life to evolve on the destination planet, where the message is waiting—but these organisms, packed with a message, are patient, and they are fecund. They quietly reproduce, carrying and copying the message hidden within their informational backbones. Until one day a sentient being takes notice of the momentous message all around it (or even within itself): “You are not alone.”

 

It’s natural for many of us to look for secrets, whether we hope for hidden passageways behind bookcases or a map scrawled on the back of the Declaration of Independence, as Nicolas Cage would have it. As pattern-seeking creatures, we perceive patterns, connections, and structures even where there are none, a phenomenon known as apophenia.

 

The geneticist George Church has shown that information can be easily stored in DNA: He and his team used a DNA microchip to write an entire book 70 billion times into DNA. They use a single nucleotide for each bit of the information, encoded in binary, similar to how the researchers looking at the bacteriophage had suspected a smart alien might encode information.

 

DNA is stable at room temperature and could last for a long time, potentially making it a good information-storage mechanism. But here’s the hitch, as Church explains: “We purposefully avoided living cells. In an organism, your message is a tiny fraction of the whole cell, so there’s a lot of wasted space. But more importantly, almost as soon as a DNA goes into a cell, if that DNA doesn’t earn its keep, if it isn’t evolutionarily advantageous, the cell will start mutating it, and eventually the cell will completely delete it.”

 

It’s one thing to have a chunk of a DNA crystal sitting around somewhere for tens of thousands of years. But that chunk, no matter how stable, is small. If you want it to really work as a vehicle for a message, it needs to reproduce and spread. So you need to put it into something living. But by doing that, if the message isn’t also useful for the organism, it will quickly mutate into oblivion.

 

Nevertheless, if these messages, hidden in some terrestrial DNA, do exist, it will take time and patience to determine this. Perhaps, as Davies argued, it is time for a massive effort that combs through all the digitized genomic information we have generated. An open-source project that does just this would be exciting for those interested in both astronomy and biology, whether or not it yields any sort of finding.

 

But one thing is likely. Any message that is found will be discovered in the regions most precious to our survival: the ones that ensure we are able to pass our genes on to the next generation. Anything less and it would have likely been swept away long ago by the constant churn of evolution.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by AdnanD
Scoop.it!

DNA nanotechnology places enzyme catalysis within an arm's length

DNA nanotechnology places enzyme catalysis within an arm's length | TeKeeG | Scoop.it
Researchers in the field of DNA nanotechnology, taking advantage of the binding properties of the chemical building blocks of DNA, twist and self-assemble DNA into ever-more imaginative 2- and 3-dimensional structures for medical, electronic and...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by AdnanD
Scoop.it!

Secret Documentary 2014 HDElevator from Earth to Space in Future ...

Secret Documentary 2014 HDElevator from Earth to Space in Future ... | TeKeeG | Scoop.it
bioengineering nanotechnology thapanar suwanmajo dolores njoku. Epigraft Euroderm future perspectives nanotechnology nanomedicine 2013 link:www sinostemcells com.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by AdnanD
Scoop.it!

Life in space? Sea plankton discovered attached to ISS outer hull

Life in space? Sea plankton discovered attached to ISS outer hull | TeKeeG | Scoop.it
Russian scientists say they made a “unique” discovery while analyzing samples from the exterior of the International Space Station – traces of tiny sea creatures on the station’s windows and walls. It remains unclear how marine plankton ended up in space.
AdnanD's insight:

Wherever these plankton might have originated from (Earth&co) and however they got on that windshield, the question is - how did they survive & -- can retrofitting a viable biotechnology out of it come anytime sooner ?? May we interest you in an outer space exoskeltal suit or ... a sun screen lotion for a gilt free tan ladies & gentlemen  ? ...

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by AdnanD from Science-Videos
Scoop.it!

Life at the Speed of Light - Craig Venter

Life at the Speed of Light - Craig Venter | TeKeeG | Scoop.it

Human deep space exploration missions require a thorough understanding of the prolonged environmental effects on life. The use of genomics and synthetic biology will transform such missions by reducing the overall risk and mass needed to sustain crew health in space. As the lead Center for space biology and synthetic biology, NASA Ames is in pursuit of these challenges.

Regarded as one of the leading scientists in genomic research of the 21st century, J. Craig Venter, Ph.D., will speak about the profound impacts these new tools will have on human⊃1;s existence on Earth and beyond.

The Director's Colloquium Summer Series is presented by the Office of the Chief Scientist at NASA's Ames Research Center as part of the Center's 75th anniversary celebration.


Videos and Slides: Next-Generation Sequencing Technologies - Elaine Mardis (2014)Improving Pacific Biosciences' Single Molecule Real Time Sequencing Technology through Advanced Matrix Factorization ?DNA Sequencing, Information Theory, Advanced Matrix Factorization and all that...It's quite simply, the stuff of Life...
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by AdnanD
Scoop.it!

Scientists make diseased cells synthesize their own drug

Scientists make diseased cells synthesize their own drug | TeKeeG | Scoop.it
In a new study that could lead to many new medicines, scientists have adapted a chemical approach to turn diseased cells into unique manufacturing sites for molecules that can treat a form of muscular dystrophy.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by AdnanD
Scoop.it!

Scientists discover how to 'switch off' autoimmune diseases

Scientists discover how to 'switch off' autoimmune diseases | TeKeeG | Scoop.it
Scientists have made an important breakthrough in the fight against debilitating autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis by revealing how to stop cells attacking healthy body tissue. Rather than the body's immune system destroying its own tissue by mistake, researchers have discovered how cells convert from being aggressive to actually protecting against disease.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by AdnanD from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

An end to drug errors? Eliminate medication errors with intelligent scanning system

An end to drug errors? Eliminate medication errors with intelligent scanning system | TeKeeG | Scoop.it
Mint Solutions tackles medication errors with scanning system that ensures patients get the right pills.

 

MIT alumni entrepreneurs Gauti Reynisson MBA ’10 and Ívar Helgason HS ’08 spent the early 2000s working for companies that implemented medication-safety technologies — such as electronic-prescription and pill-barcoding systems — at hospitals in their native Iceland and other European countries.

 

But all that time spent in hospitals soon opened their eyes to a major health care issue: Surprisingly often, patients receive the wrong medications. Indeed, a 2006 report from the Institute of Medicine found that 1.5 million hospitalized patients in the United States experience medication errors every year due, in part, to drug-administration mistakes. Some cases have adverse or fatal results.

 

Frustrated and seeking a solution, the Icelandic duo quit their careers and traveled to MIT for inspiration. There, they teamed up with María Rúnarsdóttir MBA ’08 and devised MedEye, a bedside medication-scanning system that uses computer vision to identify pills and check them against medication records, to ensure that a patient gets the right drug and dosage.

 

Commercialized through startup Mint Solutions, MedEye has now been used for a year in hospitals in the Netherlands (where the startup is based), garnering significant attention from the medical community. Through this Dutch use, the co-founders have determined that roughly 10 percent of MedEye’s scans catch medication errors.

 

“Medication verification is a pinnacle point of medical safety,” says Helgason, a physician and product developer. “It’s a complicated chain of events that leads up to medication mistakes. But the bedside is the last possible place to stop these mistakes.”

 

Mint Solutions’ aim, Reynisson says, is to aid nurses in rapidly, efficiently, and correctly administering medication. “We want the device to be the nurse’s best friend,” says Reynisson, now Mint’s CEO. The device, he adds, could yield savings by averting medication mishaps, which can cost hundreds of millions of dollars.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by AdnanD from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Introducing the multi-tasking nanoparticle for diagnostic and therapeutic applications

Introducing the multi-tasking nanoparticle for diagnostic and therapeutic applications | TeKeeG | Scoop.it

Kit Lam and colleagues from UC Davis and other institutions have created dynamic nanoparticles (NPs) that could provide an arsenal of applications to diagnose and treat cancer. Built on an easy-to-make polymer, these particles can be used as contrast agents to light up tumors for MRI and PET scans or deliver chemo and other therapies to destroy tumors. In addition, the particles are biocompatible and have shown no toxicity. The study was published online today in Nature Communications.

 

“These are amazingly useful particles,” noted co-first author Yuanpei Li, a research faculty member in the Lam laboratory. “As a contrast agent, they make tumors easier to see on MRI and other scans. We can also use them as vehicles to deliver chemotherapy directly to tumors; apply light to make the nanoparticles release singlet oxygen (photodynamic therapy) or use a laser to heat them (photothermal therapy) – all proven ways to destroy tumors.”


Jessica Tucker, program director of Drug and Gene Delivery and Devices at the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, which is part of the National Institutes of Health, said the approach outlined in the study has the ability to combine both imaging and therapeutic applications in a single platform, which has been difficult to achieve, especially in an organic, and therefore biocompatible, vehicle.

 

"This is especially valuable in cancer treatment, where targeted treatment to tumor cells, and the reduction of lethal effects in normal cells, is so critical,” she added.

 

 Though not the first nanoparticles, these may be the most versatile. Other particles are good at some tasks but not others. Non-organic particles, such as quantum dots or gold-based materials, work well as diagnostic tools but have safety issues. Organic probes are biocompatible and can deliver drugs but lack imaging or phototherapy applications.


Built on a porphyrin/cholic acid polymer, the nanoparticles are simple to make and perform well in the body. Porphyrins are common organic compounds. Cholic acid is produced by the liver.


To further stabilize the particles, the researchers added the amino acid cysteine (creating CNPs), which prevents them from prematurely releasing their therapeutic payload when exposed to blood proteins and other barriers. At 32 nanometers, CNPs are ideally sized to penetrate tumors, accumulating among cancer cells while sparing healthy tissue.


In the study, the team tested the nanoparticles, both in vitro and in vivo, for a wide range of tasks. On the therapeutic side, CNPs effectively transported anti-cancer drugs, such as doxorubicin. Even when kept in blood for many hours, CNPs only released small amounts of the drug; however, when exposed to light or agents such as glutathione, they readily released their payloads. The ability to precisely control chemotherapy release inside tumors could greatly reduce toxicity. CNPs carrying doxorubicin provided excellent cancer control in animals, with minimal side effects.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Rescooped by AdnanD from Longevity science
Scoop.it!

Tissue regeneration using anti-inflammatory nanomolecules | KurzweilAI

Tissue regeneration using anti-inflammatory nanomolecules | KurzweilAI | TeKeeG | Scoop.it

The research group of Arun K. Sharma*, PhD has developed a system for patients with urinary bladder dysfunction that may protect them against an inflammatory reaction** resulting from tissue regeneration, which can negatively impact tissue growth, development and function.

 

The researchers treated a highly pro-inflammatory biologic scaffold with anti-inflammatory peptide amphiphiles (AIF-PAs). (Self-assembling peptide amphiphiles, or PAs, are biocompatible and biodegradable nanomaterials used in a wide range of settings and applications.) When compared with control PAs, the treated scaffold reduced the innate inflammatory response, resulting in superior bladder function.

 

 


Via Ray and Terry's
AdnanD's insight:

A very very interesting read 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by AdnanD from Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Scoop.it!

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East | TeKeeG | Scoop.it
These maps are crucial for understanding the region's history, its present, and some of the most important stories there today.

Via Seth Dixon, Sharrock
more...
Lora Tortolani's curator insight, March 15, 2015 8:47 PM

It is interesting to see the same trends over and over again.  These maps are a great tool to show the history of the area, as well as the history of religion and political views.  I appreciate the information provided since the Middle East has undergone the most transitions (going all the way back to Mesopotamia) and its history can be confusing. 

Alex Vielman's curator insight, November 23, 2015 3:17 PM

Maps like the ones posted in this article, really helps people to understand and break down deeply of understanding the entire region as a whole. Visualization is very important in geography when trying to understand the region people are talking about. this region as goes down to the Mesopotamia Era. It is important to know, how the culture was in this area to how it differentiated during the Ottoman Empire. During the first couple of maps, we can begin to see the division of the entire region. As you go on, we begin to notice the divisions between people, religion, language between states and in-states. There is so much information to know about the Middle East region and it may be even harder to understand due to the tons of changes and separations, but it is important to understand these divisions like the Sunni's and the Shi'ites in order to fully explain the development and the current situations that are occurring in this region as we speak. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 7, 2015 5:18 PM

These 40 maps are a very interesting way of showing how people have traveled around and moved about the Earth from the time of the fertile crescent era to the people of today. It shows us the paths that people have taken to move to a new location. How they used the Meditteranean Sea to move from one side to the other. It also shows how the Tigris and Euphrates came together to form a smaller area of the Persian gulf. This led to smalled economic growth because now there is less land for imports and exports.