Teens + Social Media = Social Anxiety
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Everybody's Life Is Better Than Mine…on Facebook...

Everybody's Life Is Better Than Mine…on Facebook... | Teens + Social Media = Social Anxiety | Scoop.it
Social comparison on social networking sites is likely to lead to unhappiness. By Jesse Fox, Ph.D....

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The Profile Picture

The Profile Picture | Teens + Social Media = Social Anxiety | Scoop.it

"Every teenage girl I know adheres to the cardinal rules of the profile picture..." 


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Costs of Communication on email, Facebook, and Twitter

Costs of Communication on email, Facebook, and Twitter | Teens + Social Media = Social Anxiety | Scoop.it

This article talks about the dangers of communicating through social media and how it relates to face to face communication. Since we do communicate using these sources, Dr. Alex Lickerman explains etiquette and balance when using them. He says, “Making our meaning clear electronically presents extra challenges. For example, we write things like “LOL” and “LMOA” to describe our laughter, but they’re no real substitute for hearing people laugh, which has real power to lift our spirits when we’re feeling low.”

http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2010/07/costs-communication-email-facebook-twitter.html

 


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Blogging may help teens dealing with social distress

Blogging may help teens dealing with social distress | Teens + Social Media = Social Anxiety | Scoop.it
Blogging may have psychological benefits for teens suffering from social anxiety, improving their self-esteem and helping them relate better to their friends, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

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Social Anxiety in the Age of Social Networks

Social Anxiety in the Age of Social Networks | Teens + Social Media = Social Anxiety | Scoop.it

The advent of the Internet has changed the way individu­als and groups of individuals interact with one another and the world. In fact, an entire generation has been brought up with the idea that “socializing” includes an online component. Yet despite the recent technological advances in social communication, and the fact that social bonding is a crucial psychological aspect of being human, there are certain individuals for whom social interactions are difficult, leading to real-life anxiety


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My Findings

Social Media has been one of the fastest growing aspects of the Internet. Facebook, MySpace, Twitter and other such means of communication are being used by millions all around the world each and every day. With the emergence of these websites, people now have easier means of communication through the use of a single website. Thus, through this ease, people are resorting to using the Internet and other such means of social media to communicate at an unprecedented amount. This is especially true for teenagers today, the people we call digital natives. Rather than speaking with someone face-to-face, picking up a telephone, or writing a letter, teens use the Internet for communication. This is where I raise my question. How has the lack of face-to-face communication on social network sites affected how teenagers personally communicate?


It has come to scientists’ and psychologists’ attention that by using the social media more than face-to-face communication, there could be possible fallouts for how a teenager will act in the future. Through my research, I have found that most researchers are quite inconclusive at the time. Results are either extremely negative or profoundly positive for a teenager’s demeanor in life. On a positive note, some studies have found that through social media, teenagers are bettering the way they communicate outside of social media. When they come face-to-face with someone, their communication skills are bettered because they have ‘practiced’ on the Internet. Studies have also shown that most people teens talk to through social media are actually their friends whom they have face-to-face conversations with on a regular basis. So, in a way, face-to-face communication has remained the same even with the emergence of social media.


Researchers have also found there are many negative aspects revolving around teens using social media and face-to-face communication. A few studies showed that by using social media more and more, teens are losing their ability to read non-verbal cues from other people. Emotion and intimacy are lacking with teens and the newer generation because they do not know how to judge how someone feels outside of the emoticons and slang phrases. In another study, psychologists believe that social anxiety is starting to result from heavy social media users. Teens are afraid to speak to others in public. They, in fact, use the internet to hide behind.


Overall, the answer to my question cannot be looked at with a concise response just yet. The era of social media users is still young. Years and years of studies need to be conducted until a final answer can be found determining whether the lack of face-to-face communication will affect teenagers. Right now, there are too many ideas regarding whether it is helpful or detrimental. In my opinion, as I find more and more articles talking about this topic, I believe the negative is overpowering the positive. Social media is going to affect the way we speak and compose ourselves out from behind the wall of the internet.


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Dom Cima's comment, March 11, 2013 2:22 PM
Researchers have discovered that there are many negative outlooks concerning teens using social networking and human interaction. Some studies show that the more often teens use social networking they are less likely to understand emotional signs from other people. This is a result of teens using slang words and emojis to show their emotions rather than displaying them in person. Also other researchers have found that teens that using social networking too much can lead to social anxiety. This means they are afraid to confront and talk to other people and would rather "hide behind" the internet to do so.
Dom Cima's comment, March 13, 2013 10:09 AM
Everyday millions of people go onto sites such as twitter and facebook. Thanks to these websites people can communicate with much less difficulty now. Because of this is so convient to use, people are taking advantage of it and using it to much, this mainly applies to teenagers. Teens would rather go onto one of these sites to communicate than write a letter, talk on the phone, or even talk to them in person.
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Not Not Communicating by Michael Rabby » Are Teens Hiding Behind The Screen?

Not Not Communicating by Michael Rabby » Are Teens Hiding Behind The Screen? | Teens + Social Media = Social Anxiety | Scoop.it

This article looks at a teenager’s personality when using social media. The author here aims at comparing social technologies and shyness among teenagers. A survey was set up to determine how much time teenagers spent on technologies and the teen’s feelings towards face-to-face communication. The results showed that there was ‘a connection between social introversion and socially interactive technologies.’ In a sense, if a teen doesn’t like interacting face-to-face, they are more likely to use social media. This survey, thus, shows that shy teens are being provided with comforting means of communication rather than having them practice in front of another human being. This article is interesting to me because it is showing the psychology of social media. Social media has become a problem for people who are shy and afraid to ‘be in public.’


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Kiersten McGeary's comment, March 18, 2013 7:50 PM
I could use this website to show how kids are hiding there feelings behind a computer screen
Tami Yaklich's comment, March 27, 2013 11:14 AM
Source credibility?
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Students on Screens: Multitasking and Device Use Among Teens

Students on Screens: Multitasking and Device Use Among Teens | Teens + Social Media = Social Anxiety | Scoop.it

Teens and 20-somethings are known for boasting about their multitasking abilities. “Sure, I can watch TV while texting my friends and shopping on my laptop and doing my homework!


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Kyle Osborne's curator insight, April 26, 11:47 AM
Illustrated in the cartoon of data, the most interesting point is that 8 out of 10 college students can use a second screen while watching T.V. Now multi-tasking is something that has been since we can all remember, however isn't just more of a distraction? To fully understand and gain comprehension of the task or message it needs full attention. Of course you can do two things simultaneously but it will never be as good as if you focused solely on that one task.

Spending twice as more time on screens at school does not help shape us for a productive future. It creates dependency on technology to solve the problems. In a high school setting kids were much more likely to play games on the computers at school than do anything educational(I'm certainly guilty).  This article highlights points that show students are distracted by video games. So by giving them the internet and video games makes them more productive?
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vintage-social-networking | John Atkinson

vintage-social-networking | John Atkinson | Teens + Social Media = Social Anxiety | Scoop.it

Another great social 'toon from John Atkinson


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Social Anxiety Documentary: Afraid of People

This is the only documentary I've seen that focuses on SA so i hope it helps people with it. Below are websites that offer help and support for people with S...

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Structural and Functional Connectivity Changes in the Brain Associated with Shyness but Not with Social Anxiety

Structural and Functional Connectivity Changes in the Brain Associated with Shyness but Not with Social Anxiety | Teens + Social Media = Social Anxiety | Scoop.it

Shyness and social anxiety are correlated to some extent and both are associated with hyper-responsivity to social stimuli in the frontal cortex and limbic system. However to date no studies have investigated whether common structural and functional connectivity differences in the brain may contribute to these traits. We addressed this issue in a cohort of 61 healthy adult subjects. Subjects were first assessed for their levels of shyness (Cheek and Buss Shyness scale) and social anxiety (Liebowitz Social Anxiety scale) and trait anxiety. They were then given MRI scans and voxel-based morphometry and seed-based, resting-state functional connectivity analysis investigated correlations with shyness and anxiety scores. Shyness scores were positively correlated with gray matter density in the cerebellum, bilateral superior temporal gyri and parahippocampal gyri and right insula. Functional connectivity correlations with shyness were found between the superior temporal gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus and the frontal gyri, between the insula and precentral gyrus and inferior parietal lobule, and between the cerebellum and precuneus. Additional correlations were found for amygdala connectivity with the medial frontal gyrus, superior frontal gyrus and inferior parietal lobule, despite the absence of any structural correlation. By contrast no structural or functional connectivity measures correlated with social or trait anxiety. Our findings show that shyness is specifically associated with structural and functional connectivity changes in cortical and limbic regions involved with processing social stimuli. These associations are not found with social or trait anxiety in healthy subjects despite some behavioral correlations with shyness.


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shows a good outline of how a informative peice is writen

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Does talking trump internet social networking?

Does talking trump internet social networking? | Teens + Social Media = Social Anxiety | Scoop.it

"Social wellness (health) is measured by one’s ability to get along and interact effectively with others, appreciating their diversity, maintaining satisfying re..."

 

For the most part, this article is arguing that the global revolution of technology is ruining the wellbeing of human contact. The author made an interesting comparison using the academy award winning film, The Artist. He claims that people are starting to garner anxiety, like in the movie, when forced to talk in ‘public.’ The actor in the movie is afraid to speak in movies and people today are afraid to speak when they are not on the internet. The author claims that in order to change this anxiety, teachers need to be instructing their students to verbally communicate with each other while learning in classrooms. This task will involve students communicating with another face-to-face when they need a question answered. It will further help the students learn to communicate and advance their skills for the future. I found this article to be insightful because of its solution to fixing communication skills. If people use this idea, we may stray away from using social networking sites so often.


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BBC NEWS | UK | Online networking 'harms health'

BBC NEWS | UK | Online networking 'harms health' | Teens + Social Media = Social Anxiety | Scoop.it
Social networking sites could be harming people's health by reducing levels of face-to-face contact, an expert claims.

 

Social networking has become the biggest area of growth on the internet. This article explains that teens and people of other ages are spending more time on the Internet’s social networking sites more than interacting with people face-to-face. I find that this article is especially interesting because it is discussing the evolutionary effects the Internet and social networking has on us. Dr. Sigman explains that it is a biological need to interact with another human being. Being with another human has many benefits such as bettering immune systems, releasing certain hormones, and other such responses. Yet, as we spend less and less time with humans, it is inevitable that the evolution of human beings will change over time. We will go from needing constant communication in order to better the human race into creating a population driven by singular, personal needs.


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Katie Maguire's curator insight, July 3, 2013 4:47 PM

I can relate to this in my life. When I am sick, and can't see my friends or other people I know, I will spend a lot of the day on facebook, and it makes me feel more connected than before, but I still feel a strong desire to interact with people.