TechWatch
10.0K views | +0 today
Follow
TechWatch
Monitoring innovations in hardware, software and vaporware
Curated by Nicolas Weil
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Nicolas Weil
Scoop.it!

New Closed-Captioning Glasses Help Deaf Go Out To The Movies

New Closed-Captioning Glasses Help Deaf Go Out To The Movies | TechWatch | Scoop.it

There will be a special attraction for deaf people in theaters nationwide soon. By the end of this month, Regal Cinemas plans to have distributed closed-captioning glasses to more than 6,000 theaters across the country.

 

Sony Entertainment Access Glasses are sort of like 3-D glasses, but for captioning. The captions are projected onto the glasses and appear to float about 10 feet in front of the user. They also come with audio tracks that describe the action on the screen for blind people, or they can boost the audio levels of the movie for those who are hard of hearing.

 

This is a big moment for the deaf, many of whom haven't been to the movies in a long time. Captioned screenings are few and far between, and current personal captioning devices that fit inside a cup holder with a screen attached are bulky, display the text out of their line of vision to the screen, and distract the other patrons.

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicolas Weil
Scoop.it!

I used Google Glass: the future, but with monthly updates

I used Google Glass: the future, but with monthly updates | TechWatch | Scoop.it

The frosted-glass doors on the 11th floor of Google’s NYC headquarters part and a woman steps forward to greet me. This is an otherwise normal specimen of humanity. Normal height, slender build; her eyes are bright, inquisitive. She leans in to shake my hand and at that moment I become acutely aware of the device she’s wearing in the place you would expect eyeglasses: a thin strip of aluminum and plastic with a strange, prismatic lens just below her brow. Google Glass.

more...
No comment yet.