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Sebastian Vettel Explores Future of Formula One, Road Car Technology - Dubai Chronicle

Sebastian Vettel Explores Future of Formula One, Road Car Technology - Dubai Chronicle | TechSmurf Futuristic Technologies | Scoop.it
Sebastian Vettel Explores Future of Formula One, Road Car Technology Dubai Chronicle One example of this future technology was put to the test by the World Championship leader as he took the wheel of an Infiniti M35h – the world's fastest...

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Will the future F1 cars still have wheels? :)

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The Next Generation Attack Aircraft Concept From Boeing And Sikorsky

The Next Generation Attack Aircraft Concept From Boeing And Sikorsky | TechSmurf Futuristic Technologies | Scoop.it
Sikorsky’s coaxial X2 Demonstrator, notable for its coaxial rotor design that sees its two main rotors counter-rotating on the same vertical axis, set an unofficial world speed record for a helicopter in 2010 (250 knots, 288 mph, 463 km/h in level...
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Foxconn eyes smartwatches with new wristband technology - TechHive

Foxconn eyes smartwatches with new wristband technology - TechHive | TechSmurf Futuristic Technologies | Scoop.it
TechHive
Foxconn eyes smartwatches with new wristband technology
TechHive
Foxconn eyes smartwatches with new wristband technology.

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Proto3000's curator insight, June 27, 2013 12:53 PM

Do you have your own ideas? come visit our innovation leaders http://proto3000.com/news.php

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Sebastian Vettel Explores Future of Formula One, Road Car Technology - Dubai Chronicle

Sebastian Vettel Explores Future of Formula One, Road Car Technology - Dubai Chronicle | TechSmurf Futuristic Technologies | Scoop.it
Sebastian Vettel Explores Future of Formula One, Road Car Technology Dubai Chronicle One example of this future technology was put to the test by the World Championship leader as he took the wheel of an Infiniti M35h – the world's fastest...

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Will the future F1 cars still have wheels? :)

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Nanoscale Device Makes Light Travel Infinitely Fast - ScienceNOW

Nanoscale Device Makes Light Travel Infinitely Fast - ScienceNOW | TechSmurf Futuristic Technologies | Scoop.it

Within a nanometer-scale device, visible light travels infinitely fast—by one measure—a team of physicists and engineers reports. The gizmo won't lead to instantaneous communication—the famous speed limit of Albert Einstein's theory of relativity remains in force—but it could have a variety of uses, including serving as an element in a type of optical circuitry.

 

"The demonstration of such a thing is definitely very interesting and possibly useful," says Wenshan Cai, an electrical engineer at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, who was not involved in the work.

In empty space, light always travels at 300,000,000 meters per second. In a material such as glass, it travels slower. The ratio of light's speed in the vacuum to its speed in a material defines the material's "index of refraction," which is typically greater than one. However, scientists have begun to manipulate the interactions of light and matter to tune the index of refraction in weird ways, such as making it negative, which leads to an unusual bending of light.

 

Now, Albert Polman, a physicist at the FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics in Amsterdam; Nader Engheta, an electrical engineer at the University of Pennsylvania; and colleagues have pulled off a particularly odd feat. They've developed a tiny device in which the index of refraction for visible light is zero—so that light waves of a particular wavelength move infinitely fast.

 

The device consists of a rectangular bar of insulating silicon dioxide 85 nanometers thick and 2000 nanometers long surrounded by conducing silver, which light generally doesn't penetrate. The result is a light-conveying chamber called a waveguide. Researchers fashioned different devices in which the width of the silicon dioxide ranged from 120 to 400 nanometers, as they report in a paper in press at Physical Review Letters.

 

Light behaves differently in such a waveguide, because the electromagnetic fields must obey certain "boundary conditions" on the sides of the device. Short-wavelength light bounces back and forth between the ends of the guide, and the peaks and troughs of the counter-propagating light waves overlap to create a pattern of bright and dark bands much like the pressure patterns with a ringing organ pipe. Above a "cutoff" wavelength, light doesn't flow at all.

 

Right at the cutoff wavelength, things get interesting. Instead of producing a banded pattern, the whole waveguide lights up. That means that instead of acting as waves with equally spaced peaks, or "phase fronts," the wave behaves as if its peaks are moving infinitely fast and are everywhere at once. So the light oscillates in synchrony along the length of the waveguide.

 

Engheta and company had previously created an index of refraction of zero for longer-wavelength radiation called microwaves. Repeating the feat for visible light was harder, as the new widget is too small to contain a light source. Instead, the researchers shot in a beam of electrons to generate light of all wavelengths within the waveguide and measured the light leaking out of it. The amount of light shining out at a particular wavelength depends on whether the electron beam enters at a point where there should be a dark or a bright spot for that wavelength. So by scanning the beam along the waveguide and monitoring the output, researchers traced the light pattern at each wavelength. "It is nanofabrication and characterization at its best," says Che Ting Chan, a physicist at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology.

So how does an everywhere-at-once light wave not violate relativity? Light has two speeds, Engheta explains. The "phase velocity" describes how fast waves of a given wavelength move, and the "group velocity" describes how fast the light conveys energy or information. Only the group velocity must stay below the speed of light in a vacuum, Engheta says, and inside the waveguide, it does.

 

The device could have various uses, Engheta says. Because the light leaking out of the waveguide is all in synch, the waveguide might be bent to form an antenna that emits light wave with sculpted phase fronts, he says. It might also make a conduit for a hoped-for type of nanoscale optical circuitry, he says.

 

An array of such waveguides might even make a bulk material with zero index of refraction. But fabricating that array would be very challenging, Cai says: "In theory it's easy; experimentally it's very hard."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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IBM Labs develops 'initial step' towards commercial fabrication of carbon nanotubes

IBM Labs develops 'initial step' towards commercial fabrication of carbon nanotubes | TechSmurf Futuristic Technologies | Scoop.it

Commercialization of carbon nanotubes is one of the holy grails of next-gen computing, and IBM thinks it's made crucial steps toward making this a reality. This isn't the first time that we've heard such a claim, of course, but IBM's considerable resources will make this particularly interesting. The specific problem it's been tackling is placing enough semiconducting nanotubes together to be useful in commercial chips, with current attempts being more in the hundreds, rather than billions that would be required. The new approach uses ion-exchange chemistry that allows controlled placement of nanotubes at two orders of magnitude greater than before, with a density of roughly a billion per square centimeter. To achieve this, the nanotubes are mixed with a soap-like substance that makes them water-soluble. Next, a substrate comprising two oxides and a hafnium oxide "trench" is immersed in the soap-solution, which results in the nanotubes attaching to the hafnium oxide canals with a chemical bond. Simple when you think about it! IBM hopes that as the materials and method are readily accessible now, that industry players will be able to experiment with nanotube technology at a much greater scale. Though, as we've become accustomed, there's no solid timescales on when this might realistically unfold.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Samsung tests brainwave technology to find new ways to interact with mobile devices - Neurogadget.com

Samsung tests brainwave technology to find new ways to interact with mobile devices - Neurogadget.com | TechSmurf Futuristic Technologies | Scoop.it

Samsung is actively doing research on brainwave technology to find an alternative way of interaction with mobile devices. The South Korean company aims to help people with mobility impairments to connect to the world.


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NASA is also doing research on brainwaves to allow astonauts steer spacecrafts using their thoughts. http://www.techsmurf.com/future-astronauts-will-steer-spacecrafts-using-their-thoughts/

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Groundbreaking Virtual Robotics Allow Us Our Very Own Robot Avatar

Groundbreaking Virtual Robotics Allow Us Our Very Own Robot Avatar | TechSmurf Futuristic Technologies | Scoop.it

A research group lead by Professor Tachi at Keio University in Japan is currently working on one of the first incarnations of an avatar that incorporates some pretty cool virtual robotics technology. By slipping on a pair of virtual reality gloves and a helmet, you would be able to control and see the world through your avatar’s eyes. The concept behind this virtual robotics technology is really called Telexistence, and it allows us to control a real avatar robot.


Via Szabolcs Kósa, Amruta Helwatkar
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Hayden Theuerkauf's curator insight, March 21, 2013 9:56 PM

This particular website gives information on the creation of avatar/robots that humans will be able to control. This will change the future, technology will allow humans to create there own avatar in the form of a robot, allowing humans to stay home whilst there avatar/robot goes out to do there daily needs or to even do there jobs at a single touch of a button, this technology will vastly change how the world works and runs.

cassian bulger's curator insight, March 22, 2013 5:38 AM

Technology such as this which provides an avatar that can be operated remotely has infinite potential to make the lives of countless people easyer such robots provide an "out of body" experience and when perfected can enable working remotly and remotly carrying out daily chores. With strides like this technology is taking remarkable strides into how we are shaping our future. 

Mercor's curator insight, March 22, 2013 7:03 AM

Rescooped by ManufacturingStories from How will robotics change lives in the near future onto Robotics in Manufacturing Today

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Japanese robot astronaut floats in zero gravity - video - The Guardian

Japanese robot astronaut floats in zero gravity - video The Guardian Kirobo the Japanese astronaut robot is to be sent into space onboard the Kounotori 4 spacecraft scheduled for launch from the Tanegashima space centre to travel to the...

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Google Glass: Less than what meets the eye

Google Glass: Less than what meets the eye | TechSmurf Futuristic Technologies | Scoop.it
The hype said they’d reveal the future of technology before the wearers’ eyes. But it can’t be seen yet. (Google Glass: Less than what meets the eye: I'd expected a lot more from Google Glass. The hype around this we...
TechSmurf's insight:

Well, Google Glass cannot be called yet the next big thing, but they made an important step by using wearable technology, and we will surely see true innovation from Google, as always...

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Quantum entangled batteries could be the perfect power source

Quantum entangled batteries could be the perfect power source | TechSmurf Futuristic Technologies | Scoop.it

Two European theoretical physicists have shown that it may be possible to build a near-perfect, entangled quantum battery. In the future, such quantum batteries might power the tiniest of devices — or provide power storage that is much more efficient than state-of-the-art lithium-ion battery packs. To understand the concept of quantum batteries, we need to start (unsurprisingly) at a very low level. Today, most devices and machines that you interact with are governed by the rules of classical mechanics (Newton’s laws, friction, and so on). Classical mechanics are very accurate for larger systems, but they fall apart as we begin to analyze microscopic (atomic and sub-atomic) systems — which led to a new set of laws and theories that describe quantum mechanics.

 

In recent years, as our ability to observe and manipulate quantum systems has grown — thanks to machines such as the Large Hadron Collider and scanning tunneling electron microscopes — physicists have started theorizing about devices and machines that use quantum mechanics, rather than classical. In theory, these devices could be much smaller, more efficient, or simply act in rather unsurprising ways. In this case, Robert Alicki of the University of Gdansk in Poland, and Mark Fannes of the University of Leuven in Belgium, have defined a battery that stores and releases energy using quantum mechanics.

 

The increasing amount of energy that can be extracted from a quantum battery, as you increase the number of entangled copies. This graph probably won’t make much sense unless you’re a quantum physicist.

 

A quantum system (say, the single proton and electron in a hydrogen atom) has a quantum state, defined by the electron’s movements. (Quick aside: In our previous discussions ofspintronics and quantum computing, it is thespin of the electron (clockwise, counterclockwise, etc.) that is converted into a qubit value). Some quantum states have a very small amount of energy that can be extracted, returning it to a passive, neutral state. In theory, according to Alicki and Fannes, it should be possible to build a quantum battery that is full of energy-rich quantum states — and then, somehow, recharge it when you run out of juice.

 

Better yet, the physicists also theorize that quantum entanglement could be used to create an even more efficient quantum battery. In essence, Alicki and Fannes say that you can link together any number of quantum batteries, allowing you to extract all of the stored energy in one big gulp (pictured above). Their research paper goes on to say that with enough entanglement, these batteries would be perfect — with no energy lost/wasted during charge or discharge.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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3D-Printed Rocket Parts Will Take NASA to Mars

3D-Printed Rocket Parts Will Take NASA to Mars | TechSmurf Futuristic Technologies | Scoop.it

NASA engineers are building the largest rocket ever constructed — one that will eventually take us beyond the moon — using 3D-printed materials.

 

Creating this rocket, called the Space Launch System (SLS), is a top priority at the agency because it has a big date: Obama wants to get humans to an asteroid and then on to Mars by the mid 2030s. To speed up the construction process, NASA is relying on a form of 3D printing to fabricate some of its engine parts virtually out of thin air.

 

The machine, called selective laser melting, uses a laser to build a component. Unlike traditional rocket building, which relies on welding together disparate parts, 3D printing starts with an empty table. That space fills up with a completed component, built one layer at a time, out of NASA's 3D-printing material of choice. What used to take weeks to build now only takes hours.

 

"We were looking at a way to save costs, be more efficient and reduce weight. That's how we got here," says NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden, Jr.

 

"The big thing about 3D printing is that there are no welds with seams, no places for stuff to leak in a component," he tells Mashable. "It starts from nothing and grows into what you want in one fell swoop."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Rich Rawdin's curator insight, May 10, 2013 2:43 PM

Now you know that we are in BIG trouble.

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Million-Neuron Artificial Brain Works In Real Time | Popular Science

Million-Neuron Artificial Brain Works In Real Time | Popular Science | TechSmurf Futuristic Technologies | Scoop.it

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