Technoscience and the Future
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Technoscience and the Future
The future of science, technology, the individual and society, etc
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Andrew McAfee: What will future jobs look like? | Video on TED.com

Economist Andrew McAfee suggests that, yes, probably, droids will take our jobs -- or at least the kinds of jobs we know now. In this far-seeing talk, he thinks through what future jobs might look like, and how to educate coming generations to hold them.

Andrew McAfee studies how information technology affects businesses and society.


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Rafael Doménech Sánchez's curator insight, October 22, 2014 3:10 PM
Un libro de lectura sencilla y fascinante "The Second Machine Age" que plantea un futuro en el que el crecimiento exponencial de la capacidad de computación y la creciente interconexión transformarán el paradigma económico. Puede encontrarse un avance de cómo estos cambios afectarán al mercado de trabajo en esta conferencia ofrecida por uno de los autores, Andrew McAfee. ¿Quién crees que se verá más afectado por estos cambios? ¿Tu doctor, o el jardinero que se ocupa del parque municipal? Vedlo, puede que la respuesta os sorprenda.
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Andrew McAfee: Are droids taking our jobs?

Robots and algorithms are getting good at jobs like building cars, writing articles, translating -- jobs that once required a human. So what will we humans do for work? Andrew McAfee walks through recent labor data to say: We ain't seen nothing yet. But then he steps back to look at big history, and comes up with a surprising and even thrilling view of what comes next.


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John Hagel: Rethinking Race Against the Machines

John Hagel: "If you have tightly scripted jobs that are highly standardized where there's no room for individual initiative or creativity, machines by and large can do those kinds of activities much better than human beings. They're much more predictable. They're much more reliable. We as human beings have flaws. We tend to get distracted. We tend to go off into unexpected areas. "


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The Threat of a Jobless World

The Threat of a Jobless World | Technoscience and the Future | Scoop.it

Olsen: This is a good read, but I wonder whether the writer has gone wrong in various places...

 

People are seriously worried. I’ve been in a number of conversations recently where people are very worried about our coming era of automation where fewer and fewer jobs will be left for people to do.
At the same time, our best thinkers don’t seem to have good answers for what comes next. Our best colleges are training students for jobs that will no longer exist. Our business leaders are myopically focused on what’s best for them. They have an obligation to hire the fewest number of people they can get away with, and to trim staff and expenses wherever possible. And politicians don’t know what to think because there are no lobbyists for the future unemployed.
In the past, the vast majority of our layoffs were caused by economic downturns. As we move into the future, the tide will shift, and the majority of our layoffs will be caused by automation and technology.
With all the chaos and uncertainty of a workerless world looming, I’d like to step you through some of the reasons why it will not be as bad as the doomsayers are predicting.


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