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Technoscience and the Future
The future of science, technology, the individual and society, etc
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Robots: The future of elder care?

Robots: The future of elder care? | Technoscience and the Future | Scoop.it

Would you let a robot take over as a live-in nurse for your aging parent or grandparent?

In 2050, the elderly will account for 16 percent of the global population. That's 1.5 billion people over the age of 65, according to the Population Reference Bureau. Caring for those seniors - physically, emotionally and mentally - will be an enormous undertaking, and experts say there will be a shortage of professionals trained and willing to take on the job.

"We have to find more resources and have to get new ways of delivering those resources and delivering the quality of care," says Antonio Espingardeiro, an expert in robotics and automation at the University of Salford in Manchester, England.

Enter the elder-care robot.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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The Future of Medicine Is Now

The Future of Medicine Is Now | Technoscience and the Future | Scoop.it

From cancer treatments to new devices to gene therapy, a look at six medical innovations that are poised to transform the way we fight disease


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Sieg Holle's curator insight, January 10, 2013 11:34 AM

Use it or lose it   Embrace it 

 

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Danny Hillis talks Proteomics & Personalized Medicine

During his lecture at Singularity University, Hillis explained how scientific medicine is beginning to revert back to more ancient, ayurvedic lessons about healthcare. The approach is to treat the body as a system, where balance is the foundation for good health and disease and sickness are the externalities of imbalance. With advancements in proteomics and computing we can begin creating models of what a healthy bodily state looks like. In the same way we might use environmental models to analyze the global climate, we can isolate specific variables that can inform the larger picture. As the data piles up, preventative medicine will become a quantitative endeavour. Hillis believes the doctors visit of the future will be a simple blood test that measures proteins, lipids and some other key signals, which can then be plugged into a systematic database to help us treat diseases long before any symptoms arise. It is a huge upgrade in efficiency, one that could save millions of lives and alleviate the indebted healthcare system in the process.


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Smart neural dust could carry sensors deep into the human brain, send data back out

Smart neural dust could carry sensors deep into the human brain, send data back out | Technoscience and the Future | Scoop.it
You can't do science without data, and a team at Berkeley has proposed a method to get a lot more data about the brain. All they need to do is sprinkle your brain with tiny dust-like sensors.

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The $1,000 Genome Is Almost Here-–Are We Ready?

The $1,000 Genome Is Almost Here-–Are We Ready? | Technoscience and the Future | Scoop.it

The era of the $1000 genome, which is all but upon us already, is a new era of predictive and personalized medicine during which the cost of full genome sequencing for an individual or patient drops to roughly $1,000.

Think about what personalized medicine can do: having access to your own genome information will open the doors to dozens of men and women wishing to find out if they have gene variants associated with Alzheimer’s, diabetes, heart disease or cancer. In some circumstances this genome map will also help your doctor determine which drugs you should consider taking and at what dosage, which if accurate enough would be much more efficient than the current approach. Sounds great doesn’t it?


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