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Technoscience and the Future
The future of science, technology, the individual and society, etc
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Solar Engineering

Climate engineering-which could slow the pace of global warming by injecting reflective particles into the upper atmosphere-has emerged in recent years as an extremely controversial technology. A leading scientist long concerned about climate change offers a proposal for an easy fix to what is perhaps the most challenging question of our time. After decades during which very little progress has been made in reducing carbon emissions we must put this technology on the table and consider it responsibly.

David Keith is the Gordon McKay Professor of Applied Physics in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) at Harvard University and Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School.


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John Hagel: Rethinking Race Against the Machines

John Hagel: "If you have tightly scripted jobs that are highly standardized where there's no room for individual initiative or creativity, machines by and large can do those kinds of activities much better than human beings. They're much more predictable. They're much more reliable. We as human beings have flaws. We tend to get distracted. We tend to go off into unexpected areas. "


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Seven Themes for the Coming Decade

Seven Themes for the Coming Decade | Technoscience and the Future | Scoop.it

Understanding long-term trends is an important tool in identifying opportunities and risks. STEEP analysis looks at the world through five different perspectives – Social, Technological, Economic, Ecological, and Political.

The following are the major themes that are presently shaping the future...


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Andrew McAfee: What will future jobs look like? | Video on TED.com

Economist Andrew McAfee suggests that, yes, probably, droids will take our jobs -- or at least the kinds of jobs we know now. In this far-seeing talk, he thinks through what future jobs might look like, and how to educate coming generations to hold them.

Andrew McAfee studies how information technology affects businesses and society.


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Rafael Doménech Sánchez's curator insight, October 22, 2014 3:10 PM
Un libro de lectura sencilla y fascinante "The Second Machine Age" que plantea un futuro en el que el crecimiento exponencial de la capacidad de computación y la creciente interconexión transformarán el paradigma económico. Puede encontrarse un avance de cómo estos cambios afectarán al mercado de trabajo en esta conferencia ofrecida por uno de los autores, Andrew McAfee. ¿Quién crees que se verá más afectado por estos cambios? ¿Tu doctor, o el jardinero que se ocupa del parque municipal? Vedlo, puede que la respuesta os sorprenda.
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Our three-dimensional future: how 3D printing will shape the global economy

Our three-dimensional future: how 3D printing will shape the global economy | Technoscience and the Future | Scoop.it

Lately, it seems like nearly everything has been reproduced by a 3D printer. Between the group that 3D printed a gun, the people who printed a drone, and the army of items sold at this small marketplace for 3D printed goods, there are plenty of novelty uses for these suddenly trendy machines. We’re a long way from 3D printing a house, but it’s clear that the hobby is inching into the mainstream.
Yet it’s difficult not to wonder: at what point will 3D printing move beyond novelty to industry? Will these machines change the way we manufacture goods, and subsequently change the global economy, too? (Is it already happening before our very eyes?)


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The Threat of a Jobless World

The Threat of a Jobless World | Technoscience and the Future | Scoop.it

Olsen: This is a good read, but I wonder whether the writer has gone wrong in various places...

 

People are seriously worried. I’ve been in a number of conversations recently where people are very worried about our coming era of automation where fewer and fewer jobs will be left for people to do.
At the same time, our best thinkers don’t seem to have good answers for what comes next. Our best colleges are training students for jobs that will no longer exist. Our business leaders are myopically focused on what’s best for them. They have an obligation to hire the fewest number of people they can get away with, and to trim staff and expenses wherever possible. And politicians don’t know what to think because there are no lobbyists for the future unemployed.
In the past, the vast majority of our layoffs were caused by economic downturns. As we move into the future, the tide will shift, and the majority of our layoffs will be caused by automation and technology.
With all the chaos and uncertainty of a workerless world looming, I’d like to step you through some of the reasons why it will not be as bad as the doomsayers are predicting.


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