Technology transforms Healthcare
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Technology transforms Healthcare
Technology support patient's life.
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The future of emotion sensing wearables

Humans are about 72% accurate at reading emotions from facial expressions, computer vision is already up to 82%. That's just the start. What's coming next are wearables that read exactly what is going on in your emotional health, not just physical, and align it with what's happening in your life.We've already explored some of the biofeedback tech looking to minimise stress along with the now and next of tracking health and happiness. One new way we can think about what's in store for emotion sensing is to break it down into input (tracking), analysis and algorithms, and output in the form of apps and exercises.
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Can wearable technology can help healthcare for the elderly?

Can wearable technology can help healthcare for the elderly? | Technology transforms Healthcare | Scoop.it
Recent studies indicate that by 2030 the United States population will be comprised of around 74 million elderly individuals1. Such a percentage is reason to look at new senior health solutions that can provide proper, swift and affordable care.Adults are living longer lives now, and they are experiencing new health, economic and living struggles. With many of the elderly experiencing health problems that include poor mobility, vision loss, hearing loss, communication barriers and memory loss, wearable technology can be helpful.
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Parkinson's mPower App Celebrates Milestone - 12,000 Registered Users

Parkinson's mPower App Celebrates Milestone - 12,000 Registered Users | Technology transforms Healthcare | Scoop.it
mPower, a Parkinson’s disease (PD) iPhone app developed by Sage Bionetworks and a team of neurologists at the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC), marked the first year of its release by being highlighted in Apple Inc.’s “Loop You In” special product launch event on March 21, 2016.sagelogoCoinciding with the event, Sage Bionetworks, a Seattle-based nonprofit biomedical research organization, released an updated version of its mPower (Mobile Parkinson’s Observatory for Worldwide, Evidence-based Research) app with an improved user interface and enhanced functionality based on user feedback. Sage also announced that mPower will be the first app incorporated into a new Apple platform called CareKit, making the mPower app an even more valuable tool in keeping Parkinson’s patients better informed about their symptoms and care status, and as a data collecting medium for clinical studies should the user wish to participate.
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Pharma Guy's curator insight, March 29, 7:26 AM

More news about PD apps: http://bit.ly/PDscoops 

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Accenture Awarded Contract to Help Create Patient-Generated Health Data Policy Framework | Accenture Newsroom

Accenture Awarded Contract to Help Create Patient-Generated Health Data Policy Framework | Accenture Newsroom | Technology transforms Healthcare | Scoop.it
Accenture was awarded a two year consulting contract by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology.
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Exploring eight of Google's interventions in health

Exploring eight of Google's interventions in health | Technology transforms Healthcare | Scoop.it
Google is moving into digital health perhaps more than you think.

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Service communication's curator insight, February 3, 2015 9:03 AM

Les innovations de Google dans l'e-santé

Google's innovations about e-health

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Patient portal messages not yet sufficient for clinical decision support

Patient portal messages not yet sufficient for clinical decision support | Technology transforms Healthcare | Scoop.it

A Mayo Clinic study finds that patients and physicians say the use of secure portals to discuss blood pressure management is helpful. However, the information shared via portal messages rarely is sufficient for a physician to write a prescription.


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Physicians should monitor their online presence. Here's how.

Physicians should monitor their online presence. Here's how. | Technology transforms Healthcare | Scoop.it
It's important for physicians to monitor their online presence because more patients than ever are researching their doctors on the web.

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Digital marketing pharma - Pharmageek

Digital marketing pharma - Pharmageek | Technology transforms Healthcare | Scoop.it
A resource about connected healthcare, the digital revolution going on and how pharma can helpSource: www.scoop.it

Via eMedToday, Michael Lucht - www.b-innovative.eu
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The future of health rests on the internet of near things

The future of health rests on the internet of near things | Technology transforms Healthcare | Scoop.it
The hype behind the Internet of Things (IoT) appears well-founded. According to the UK Department for Business, Innovation & Skills the world market for smart city technology services will be more than £250 billion by the end of the decade.
Products, however, that come with fanfare means there is always a lot of space for disappointment. The ludicrous launch of Google Glass and the mounting desperation of smart people at a smart company when showing off an unfinished product was an early mistake.
Even earlier was the overused example of the ‘internet fridge’ that was supposed to transform grocery shopping and still hasn’t reached critical mass. We also have the latest anticlimax; sales of the Apple Watch are alleged to have been underwhelming and it may take a new version to catch consumer attention.
The IoT’s dazzling future appears to trailing a little behind, but there is one area where the hyperbole is justified and that is in the field of healthcare. The IoT is going to influence, even dominate, the way humanity will exist.

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How digital health apps can become a change agent for healthcare

How digital health apps can become a change agent for healthcare | Technology transforms Healthcare | Scoop.it

In our report Connected Health: How digital technology is transforming health and social care we highlighted the increasing pervasiveness of health apps and an urgent need to help patients and clinicians understand the efficacy and effectiveness of individual apps. We noted that, depending on definition, there are more than 100,000 health apps available to download from the various app stores; with the sheer number and variety of apps confusing clinicians and patients alike. Research in October 2013 that focused on 43,000 wellness, diet and exercise apps found that only 23,682 had a legitimate health function and most had limited and simple functionality. Indeed around 50 per cent achieved fewer than 500 downloads. So far there are about 450 health apps that have been tried and recommended by patients’ organisations featured www.myhealthapps.net and even fewer approved by the NHS Choices Health Apps Library.i


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Research study tests if smartphones can diagnose depression

Research study tests if smartphones can diagnose depression | Technology transforms Healthcare | Scoop.it
Clinical depression is the kind of ailment that can sneak up on you, ruin your attitude, destroy motivation and lead to a multitude of other mental health issues. It can be managed if you're aware of it, but a lot of depression goes undiagnosed. It doesn't have to be that way--researchers think that smartphones could one day serve as an early-warning system by passively monitoring your behavior.

So far, only one study has explored the idea, but its results show enormous potential. Researchers recruited 40 volunteers from Cragistlist, tested them for depression using a standard demographics questionnaire and installed a test app on their phone that tracked their GPS location and phone usage data. Two weeks later, that data was compared to models to try and determine if there was a correlation user behavior and depression scores--and there were. Patients at risk for depression were not only more likely to spend time at home, but they used their phone more frequently, too. After adjusting for variables, the team figured it was able to detect depression with 87% accuracy. Not bad.

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Under Armour readies Fitbit competitor with full collection of HTC-made wearables

Under Armour readies Fitbit competitor with full collection of HTC-made wearables | Technology transforms Healthcare | Scoop.it
We found it strange HTC hadn’t gotten their fitness band, the HTC Grip, out to market by now, and now we know why. The company has announced that they have suspended plans to launch the fitness band. Sad funeral time? Not quite.

The move was made because HTC feels they can do better than a simple band, especially considering there are already some pretty neat options on the market right now. Their new plan? To launch a whole fitness platform with a wide range of products with Under Armour’s help.

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Harvard researchers tested 23 online ‘symptom checkers.’ Here’s how they stack up.

Harvard researchers tested 23 online ‘symptom checkers.’ Here’s how they stack up. | Technology transforms Healthcare | Scoop.it

Ever asked the Internet what your symptoms mean and gotten a response that seemed wacky or totally off base? It's not your imagination.In an audit that is believed to be the first of its kind, Harvard Medical School researchers have tested 23 online “symptom checkers” — run by brand names such as the Mayo Clinic, the American Academy of Pediatrics and WebMD, as well as lesser-knowns such as Symptomate — and found that, though the programs varied widely in accuracy of diagnoses and triage advice, as a whole they were astonishingly inaccurate. Symptom checkers provided the correct diagnosis first in only 34 percent of cases, and within the first three diagnoses 51 percent of the time.


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Havas Lynx Medical's curator insight, July 13, 2015 3:13 AM

Of course we need a comparison with those age old symptom checkers 'doctors' to know if this is bad or not

Tom Rees's curator insight, July 13, 2015 3:46 AM

They didn't assess whether a human could do better, and they didn't assess NHS direct. Nevertheless a cautionary tale! 

David Proudlock's curator insight, July 13, 2015 4:40 AM

I wonder how IBM's Watson would fare as a symptom checker in this test?

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The future of emotion sensing wearables

Humans are about 72% accurate at reading emotions from facial expressions, computer vision is already up to 82%. That's just the start. What's coming next are wearables that read exactly what is going on in your emotional health, not just physical, and align it with what's happening in your life.We've already explored some of the biofeedback tech looking to minimise stress along with the now and next of tracking health and happiness. One new way we can think about what's in store for emotion sensing is to break it down into input (tracking), analysis and algorithms, and output in the form of apps and exercises.
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The Social Network of Healthcare - How Instagram and Twitter are Providing New Insights

Luis Rocha, Director of the Complex Systems Program in the School of Information and Computing at Indiana University Bloomington, explains the ne

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Six reasons digital health is coming of age

Digital healthcare, a discipline with enormous potential to dramatically improve healthcare and healthcare delivery as we know it, is no longer an experiment or a novelty. It is a budding industry attracting not only major new players and consumers but, most important, investors – the key to ongoing adoption and growth.Even five years ago—a relative blink of an eye in historical terms—this would not have been true. Venture capital investing in digital healthcare in 2011 totaled less than $1 billion. Two years later, it more than doubled, to $1.9 billion – better, yes, but still modest. Then along came 2014, when funding more than doubled again, to $4.3 billion, followed by yet another record—$4.5 billion—in 2015, according to investment tracker Rock Health.
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Minecraft to run artificial intelligence experiments - BBC News

Minecraft to run artificial intelligence experiments - BBC News | Technology transforms Healthcare | Scoop.it
Microsoft invites artificial intelligence developers to test their creations within Minecraft's virtual landscapes.
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Tapping IBM Watson to improve care management services for people living with chronic diseases

Tapping IBM Watson to improve care management services for people living with chronic diseases | Technology transforms Healthcare | Scoop.it
Predictive analytics and Watson cognitive computing are expected to transform care management services for patients with chronic disease.

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Do the latest wave of health apps really improve patient care?

Do the latest wave of health apps really improve patient care? | Technology transforms Healthcare | Scoop.it
At the offer of a play on the iPad in the anaesthetics nurse's hand, five-year-old William Deans instantly forgot his panic triggered by the sight of the operating theatre at Chelsea and Westminster hospital, calmly climbed onto the table and…

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Why Pharma must provide HCPs with relevant digital tools -

Why Pharma must provide HCPs with relevant digital tools - | Technology transforms Healthcare | Scoop.it
Leveraging digital health as part of Pharma companies' mission can tap into each of the key HCP needs and open doors for pharma firms...

Via Philippe Marchal, eMedToday, Michael Lucht - www.b-innovative.eu
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The role of pharma in the digital world of patient and doctors - PMLiVE

The role of pharma in the digital world of patient and doctors - PMLiVE | Technology transforms Healthcare | Scoop.it
The role of pharma in the digital world of patient and doctors
PMLiVE
When talking to doctors today, pharma has had to completely re-evaluate its former sales model.

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ResearchKit’s next breakthrough will be in drug development

ResearchKit’s next breakthrough will be in drug development | Technology transforms Healthcare | Scoop.it

A major pharmaceutical company is looking at how it might use ResearchKit to create new, potentially life-saving medicine.

Purdue Pharma, maker of painkiller Oxycontin, would be the first company to use Apple’s open-source, data collection platform for commercial use.

We know that all these changes in tech are going to impact health care, but we don’t know exactly how,” Purdue’s vice president and chief information officer Larry Pickett Jr. told BuzzFeed. “People have been talking about it for a long time, but haven’t been able to figure out how to leverage that data and take advantage of it. My team views ResearchKit as a very significant milestone in being able to move that capability ahead.”

Apple brought out ResearchKit in March. It lets users privately share their medical data with researchers studying diseases like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.

If Purdue moves forward with this plan, which is currently just something it’s considering, it would use the data-gathering tool as part of its research and development of new drugs, which it would then sell. It’s a bit of a shift from the platform’s current, non-profit applications, but Apple isn’t worried.


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Why Pharma might be especially interested in ResearchKit

Why Pharma might be especially interested in ResearchKit | Technology transforms Healthcare | Scoop.it

Apple medical ResearchKitWhen Apple first announced ResearchKit, it was met with a fair amount of skepticism about whether the data collected via smartphones would be robust enough to be useful. But just a few scant months after that announcement, it seems many in healthcare are at least paying attention to the possibilities of smartphone-based data collection in general and ResearchKit in particular.Last week the National Institutes of Health made it clear they were looking into something along those lines for the White House’s Precision Medicine Initiative. Now Buzzfeed is reporting that at least two pharma companies — GlaxoSmithKline and Purdue Pharmaceuticals — are looking into ResearchKit projects of their own.GlaxoSmithKline confirmed it was “currently working on integrating (ResearchKit) into clinical trials and planning to start in coming months.” Purdue said that they’re still in the early stages of developing something for the platform.


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FDA taps PatientsLikeMe to test the waters of social media adverse event reporting

FDA taps PatientsLikeMe to test the waters of social media adverse event reporting | Technology transforms Healthcare | Scoop.it

A study last year found that many people reported adverse drug events on Twitter.Online patient community PatientsLikeMe has found another partner for its massive repository of patient-generated data on health conditions and treatments, but it’s not another pharma company or retail pharmacy. PatientsLikeMe has announced a research partnership with the FDA: The agency will assess the platform’s feasibility as a way to generate adverse event reports, which the FDA uses to regulate drugs after their release into the market.“Most clinical trials only represent the experience of several hundred or at most several thousand patients, making it impossible to anticipate all the potential side effects of drugs in the real world,” PatientsLikeMe Co-Founder and President Ben Heywood said in a statement. “Patient-generated data give a more complete picture about a drug’s safety by providing a window into patients’ lives and healthcare experiences over time. We’re very encouraged by the FDA’s action to evaluate newer sources of data to help identify benefits and risks earlier.”


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Laurent FLOURET's curator insight, July 16, 2015 3:59 PM

FDA also met with Google about that it seems...

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NIH seeks feedback on how to collect clinical data via smartphones, wearables

NIH seeks feedback on how to collect clinical data via smartphones, wearables | Technology transforms Healthcare | Scoop.it
It looks like the NIH may be the next big stakeholder to look to mobile tools for data collection in clinical research, joining the likes of Apple and Google. As part of the White House’s Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI), announced in January during the State of the Union address, the NIH is considering using smartphones and wearables for data collection, according to a new post on the PMI blog. They are seeking public comments on how best to incorporate this technology.

In his State of the Union, President Barack Obama described the PMI as “a new Precision Medicine Initiative to bring us closer to curing diseases like cancer and diabetes — and to give all of us access to the personalized information we need to keep ourselves and our families healthier.” A more complete description came in a follow-up article penned by NIH director Dr. Francis Collins and NCI Director Dr. Harold Varmu, which stated that the initiative would include a longitudinal study of more than 1 million Americans. Last month, they solicited comments about what specifically to research. This month, the topic is how to use mobile health tools.

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