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Talent Analytics – HR’s Sixth Sense

Talent Analytics – HR’s Sixth Sense | Technology Transfer for  Development. | Scoop.it
In this blog post, we hope HR professionals can kick their sixth sense in gear with these six key data points on how to better utilize talent analytics.

Via Andrée Laforge, Elliot Pannaman
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Andrée Laforge's curator insight, December 8, 2014 8:44 AM

Et vous utilisez-vous votre sixième sens?

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A Business Model For Digital Creators? | Plus Ultra Technologies/30 steps

A Business Model For Digital Creators?  | Plus Ultra Technologies/30 steps | Technology Transfer for  Development. | Scoop.it

A Business Model For Digital Creators?...


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A Business Model For Digital Creators?.  -   */S.Y\  The Modern World has Index of Transformation. QR - Codes, Cellular, Cryptocurrency , ... ext.  Transformation of Thought Leader give New Understanding & Analytical Wisdom. This is Digital Creator of Your Business Model.
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Perspectives in Chemistry—Steps towards Complex Matter

Perspectives in Chemistry—Steps towards Complex Matter | Technology Transfer for  Development. | Scoop.it

Chemistry is progressively unraveling the processes that underlie the evolution of matter towards states of higher complexity and the generation of novel features along the way by self-organization under the pressure of information. Chemistry has evolved from molecular to supramolecular to become adaptive chemistry by way of constitutional dynamics, which allow for adaptation, through component selection in an equilibrating set. Dynamic systems can be represented by weighted dynamic networks that define the agonistic and antagonistic relationships between the different constituents linked through component exchange. Such networks can be switched through amplification/up-regulation of the best adapted/fittest constituent(s) in a dynamic set. Accessing higher level functions such as training, learning, and decision making represent future lines of development for adaptive chemical systems.

 

Prof. Dr. Jean-Marie Lehn

Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Article first published online: 18 FEB 2013

DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208397


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Perspectives in Chemistry—Steps towards Complex Matter. - */S.Y\ Power up your Thinking with a Permanent Creativity.  This is New Level of Knowledge for New Chemistry / Nanotechnology/.
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NatProdChem's curator insight, February 19, 2013 8:11 PM

Pr. Lehn's exciting conclusion :

 


Angewandte Chemie, Applied Chemistry! All too often is
chemistry considered as a mere utilitarian activity, barely
a science, when it is not despised…It must be “green”, it must
answer the questions raised by society, it must store the CO2
that others have produced, it must provide the solutions to
problems that others have generated, and so on … It is great
to be considered so resourceful, but is that really all chemistry
is about?
Some time ago, a science writer from one of those socalled
“high-impact” journals, told me that he was writing an
essay on the big questions in science, noting, in words on
which I am expanding: the physicists proclaim, we are trying
to unravel the laws of the universe. A big question, indeed.
The biologists say, we are unraveling the rules of life. A big
question, too. What are the chemists doing? They are
producing new molecules, novel materials, useful drugs;
fine, very nice, and of much help, but, where is the big
question?

 

My answer was in substance: “Wait a minute,
maybe chemistry is in charge of the biggest question of all,
and that is: How does and did matter become complex?

 

How is it, that from divided, to condensed, to organized, to living,
and on to thinking matter, the universe produced an entity
that is able to ask about the origin of the very universe from
which it emerged and about its own coming about? An entity
able, in a radical short cut, to interrogate the universe itself
from which it is born? Relativity theory, quantum physics,
fantastic advances of science, but how is it that an Albert
Einstein, a Max Planck, and so many other great scientists
(and artists, and others …) of all types could arise? And the
answer to this BIG question is: by self-organization! It
happened by itself, on the basis of the laws of the universe.
But how? And here the answer to the how, also answers the
why. It is the task of chemistry to decipher what lies behind
this word, to fill in the steps that progressively led to matter of
increasing complexity, to find out how new properties
emerged at each level, to look beyond at what higher forms
of complex matter are there to be evolved, to be created in the
minds and hands of the scientists. Thus, chemistry builds the
bridge between the laws of the universe and their specific
expressions in life and thought (Figure 2). The goal is to
discover, understand, and implement the processes that
govern the evolution of matter towards increasing complexity,
from particles to thoughts. Here we come back to the
beginning (Figures 1–3) to look into the future.
On the occasion of the International Year of Chemistry,
2011, the French Physical Society asked me for a brief general
text for their magazine Reflets de la Physique. I concluded,
somewhat provocatively, that Chemistry is to Physics what
a Beethoven quartet is to the laws of acoustics! And so,
forward to the next 125 years …

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Technology transfer: The leap to industry : Nature : Nature Publishing Group

Technology transfer: The leap to industry : Nature : Nature Publishing Group | Technology Transfer for  Development. | Scoop.it

The science done in university laboratories can change the world, but only when discoveries can be transformed into innovations.


Since Bayh–Dole was enacted, technology-transfer offices have proliferated at universities in the United States and elsewhere. In 2014, at least 6,300 licences were secured by technology-transfer offices in the United States. Technology transfer has made available discoveries such as cancer drugs, recombinant DNA, imaging diagnostics and nanotechnology — in the United States alone, more than 23,000 patents have been filed by universities.


The first-to-invent system awards patents to the individual who first conceived the idea, created a workable prototype and then filed a patent. The first-to-file approach awards the patent to whoever submits the paperwork first, regardless of when the idea was conceived. The change to the US system may reduce interference proceedings — lengthy and costly battles that follow claims to a patent by separate parties, as is currently happening between the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and the University of California, Berkeley, over CRISPR–Cas9 gene-editing technology. 


However, the first-to-file approach could shift the focus away from carefully ensuring that an innovation is workable in favour of racing to file paperwork on an incomplete idea. The change could also favour large companies — with the resources, such as staff and attorneys, to handle large volumes of patents — over smaller companies or independent inventors.


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The science done in university laboratories can change the world, but only when discoveries can be transformed into innovations. - */S.Y\ Leadership's Secret is Find New Paradigm for Development.
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Krishan Maggon 's curator insight, May 6, 2016 2:13 AM
Jessica Wapner 
Nature 533, S13–S15 (05 May 2016) doi:10.1038/533S13a Published online 04 May 2016
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Multipotentiality: multiple talents, multiple challenges

Multipotentiality: multiple talents, multiple challenges | Technology Transfer for  Development. | Scoop.it
Multipotentiality is having many exceptional talents and potential careers, but being a multipotentialite can be a source of debilitating stress.

 

One of the myths of high ability, multitalented people is they can choose whatever personal and career paths they want, and realize their abilities without hindrance.

It doesn’t always work out that way.


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Multipotentiality: multiple talents, multiple challenges. – */S.Y\ A Permanent Creativity as Index of High – Potential Talent .

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Teacher As Coach: Transforming Teaching With the A Coaching Mindset « Kirsten Olson

In a delightful 2012 video, renowned comedian John Cleese described his own ideas about how to get people into an “open” cognitive space, the seat of creativity, in Cleese’s view–and also how not to. Cleese outlines three absolute, surefire ways to guarantee people won’t be creative, inventive, and intellectually self-confident: bar humor, make sure everyone knows how important you are, and especially, make sure everyone is constantly busy.  “So demand urgency at all times, use lots of fighting talk and war analogies, and establish a permanent atmosphere of stress, of breathless anxiety, and crisis.” Do these things Cleese observes, and you’re certain to have a lot of unhappy, closed, un-creative people [and students] around you.

 

Coaching as a paradigm for transforming the pedagogical relationship between student and teacher, in order to promote creativity, initiative, and the much-touted 21st-century skill set, is just beginning to take hold as professional coaching’s fundamental precepts[viii] are more widely understood.  

 

Professional coaching rests on several fundamental principles:  it assumes that the person, or set of individuals one is interacting with, is already skillful, wise, and has a profound desire to learn and to achieve the goals they feel are important.  It also assumes that most of us find reflection, experimentation, and accountability helpful in achieving our goals.

Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

As Lou Cozolino’s (2012) wonderful new book on the social neuroscience of education makes clear, how we feel about our learning environments, and the assumptions that are made about us as learners within them, dramatically affect our brain development and our capacity to produce creative and novel work products.[xii].  -  */S.Y\ Transformation of Thought Leader give New Understanding & Analytical Wisdom  and  the  Evolution on  Content.

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Leadership, Emotional Intelligence and Positive Reinforcement - Huffington Post (blog)

Leadership, Emotional Intelligence and Positive Reinforcement - Huffington Post (blog) | Technology Transfer for  Development. | Scoop.it
Leadership, Emotional Intelligence and Positive Reinforcement Huffington Post (blog) Professor Daniel Goleman, author of the immensely popular and influential revision of IQ called Emotional Intelligence, published in 1995, has just written a new...

Via Gabriela Dominguez
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Paying greater attention and developing self-awareness -- what in Zen is called "mindfulness" -- leads to greater happiness. The connection of awareness to creativity, including Goleman's belief that positive reinforcement is far more persuasive and conducive to change than repeated diatribes that the sky is always falling, is my topic for this week.  -  */S.Y\  Self-Awareness is the Positive Result of Transformation with new Mindset.  

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'Disruption' Does Not Define Success

'Disruption' Does Not Define Success | Technology Transfer for  Development. | Scoop.it

My intent here is not to provide a lesson in syntax, but rather to share five principles that define success and challenge the perceived necessity of disruption.

Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

In closing, I salute you for taking on the awesome responsibility of moving this world from the “as is” state to the transformative “to be” state.  -   */S.Y\ The Modern World has Index of Transformation. QR - Codes,Cellular, Cryptocurrency,.. ext. 

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How Our Minds Mislead Us: The Marvels and Flaws of Our Intuition

How Our Minds Mislead Us: The Marvels and Flaws of Our Intuition | Technology Transfer for  Development. | Scoop.it

"Every year, intellectual impresario and Edge editor John Brockman summons some of our era’s greatest thinkers and unleashes them on one provocative question, whether it’s the single most elegant theory of how the world works orthe best way to enhance our cognitive toolkit. This year, he sets out on the most ambitious quest yet, a meta-exploration of thought itself:Thinking: The New Science of Decision-Making, Problem-Solving, and Prediction (public library) collects short essays and lecture adaptations from such celebrated and wide-ranging (though not in gender) minds as Daniel Dennett, Jonathan Haidt, Dan Gilbert, and Timothy Wilson, covering subjects as diverse as morality, essentialism, and the adolescent brain.

One of the most provocative contributions comes from Nobel-winning psychologist Daniel Kahneman — author of the indispensable Thinking, Fast and Slow, one of the best psychology books of 2012 — who examines “the marvels and the flaws of intuitive thinking.”


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There is no sharp line between intuition and perception. … Perception is predictive. . . . If you want to understand intuition, it is very useful to understand perception, because so many of the rules that apply to perception apply as well to intuitive thinking. Intuitive thinking is quite different from perception. Intuitive thinking has language. Intuitive thinking has a lot of word knowledge organized in different ways more than mere perception. But some very basic characteristics [of] perception are extended almost directly to intuitive thinking.  -   */S.Y\  Your  Intuition  is  Your  Mindsight  of  Intuitive  Thinking.

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Online Professionalism and the Mirror of Social Media

Online Professionalism and the Mirror of Social Media | Technology Transfer for  Development. | Scoop.it

The rise of social media—content created by Internet users and hosted by popular sites such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Wikipedia, and blogs—has brought several new hazards for medical professionalism. First, many physicians may find applying principles for medical professionalism to the online environment challenging in certain contexts. Second, physicians may not consider the potential impact of their online content on their patients and the public. Third, a momentary lapse in judgment by an individual physician to create unprofessional content online can reflect poorly on the entire profession. To overcome these challenges, we encourage individual physicians to realize that as they “tread” through the World Wide Web, they leave behind a “footprint” that may have unintended negative consequences for them and for the profession at large. We also recommend that institutions take a proactive approach to engage users of social media in setting consensus-based standards for “online professionalism.” Finally, given that professionalism encompasses more than the avoidance of negative behaviors, we conclude with examples of more positive applications for this technology. Much like a mirror, social media can reflect the best and worst aspects of the content placed before it for all to see.

KEY WORDS: professionalism, internet use, medical ethics, health policyGo to:INTRODUCTION

The Internet has changed many interactions between professionals and the public. The recent development of Web 2.0 applications (also known as “social media”) has created particular hazards for public views of certain professions. School teachers1 and lawyers2 across the country have been sanctioned or fired for online indiscretions felt to violate societal expectations for how they represent their personal lives in the public sphere. Recently, similar incidents have also involved physicians. In one instance, physicians and other health professionals delivering aid in Haiti posted pictures online of naked and unconscious patients in operating suites, and of physicians drinking or posing with grins and “thumbs up” in front of patients or coffins.3 While it is tempting to view such incidents as rare events, recent research has shown that posting of unprofessional content is common among medical students, residents, and other health care providers.4–6 In many cases, users of social media may simply fail to consider issues of professionalism in their online actions and may, in fact, routinely display exemplary ethics and character in their offline actions. As a case in point, the professionals cited above exemplified principles of altruism and social justice through their volunteer work in Haiti and were ultimately exonerated by licensing authorities.7 Still, damage to public perceptions of the medical aid effort was already done. Rather than blaming the technology or vilifying the user, we believe this example underscores the need for improved education and communication about the use of social media by professionals.8,9

Go to:ONLINE ACTIVITY, MEDICAL PROFESSIONALISM, AND THE PUBLIC

Although principles and commitments for medical professionalism already exist,10 we believe that many physicians may have difficulty applying these principals to their online actions for at least three reasons. First, some of the online content that has been identified as unprofessional in both the medical literature and mass media may not clearly violate existing principles of medical professionalism. For example, some physicians may not realize that images of off-duty drinking on a social networking site may raise questions from the public about unprofessional behavior, especially if intoxication is implied. A second and related concern is that many people experience a sense of disinhibition in their online actions. Social media in particular can create a perception of anonymity and detachment from social cues and consequences for online actions.11 Thus, medical professionals may say or do things they would not say or do in person, such as disclosure of confidential information (including pictures of patients), or display speech and behaviors that are disrespectful to colleagues or patients and their families. Third, the potential impact of such indiscretions is much greater than typical face-to-face interactions because of the wide reach of this media. While physicians must always be vigilant to avoid violating patient confidentiality, a slip made online can have far greater impact than one made over lunch with a colleague.

Regrettably, social media can enable content posted in a momentary lapse in judgment to spread rapidly beyond the intended audience with a simple “click.” In this sense, social media can act as a mirror reflecting intimate thoughts and behaviors back to oneself as well as to others around the world. For an increasingly Internet-savvy public, “images” reflected by this social media mirror may prove very important in sizing up not only the credentials, but also the character of professionals. Moreover, when amplified by press coverage, unprofessional images of professionals in the social media mirror may also be magnified or distorted as in the case of the physicians providing aid in Haiti.

While rigorous studies on patient perceptions of physicians’ social media use are lacking, recent media coverage of the topic12 and online reader responses, such as the following, are illuminating: “Medicine is a very serious profession…[but] teetering on the edge of respectability and trust in some areas. Soon there will be so little trust that it will undermine the respectable people who have chosen this profession.”13 Other readers posted similar comments, “Anybody who isn't smart enough to figure out what's OK to post on the Internet has absolutely no business being in charge of other people's health,” and “As professionals, doctors, teachers, lawyers, etc., are held to a certain standard. If that's not your cup of tea, find a different job.” These comments suggest that some may view a physician’s online activity as a proxy for the common sense and trustworthiness needed to handle the responsibilities of patient care. Moreover, when technology such as social media has the ability to alter ways in which physicians can interact with individual patients and the public at large, physicians must reconsider the implications of their professional commitments.14 While it may not be necessary to expand the existing framework for professionalism, physicians should at least consider the issues raised by social media and make informed decisions for themselves, or in collaboration with colleagues or superiors, to decide what is appropriate and inappropriate for their group, institution, or workplace as they represent themselves in a new web where user-generated content abounds.

Go to:SUGGESTIONS FOR INDIVIDUALS AND INSTITUTIONS

To illustrate the impact of an individual’s online actions, the Pew Internet and American Life Project has advanced the idea that each Internet user creates a “digital footprint.”15 This concept encourages individuals to think of downstream consequences for each online action they take and become aware that as they “tread” through the World Wide Web, they leave behind a “footprint.” This footprint is visible to others and may have unintended negative consequences, such as diminishing one’s chances to obtain a desired training position or job. But beyond the self-interested rationale for monitoring online activity to protect themselves, physicians also have a duty to consider the broader impact of their “digital footprint” and how their online actions reflect on the profession at large—much in the way that the concept of a “carbon footprint” invokes the greater cause of environmentalism. Thus, the concept of “think globally, act locally” applies to physician behavior online in the same way it applies to human behavior in relation to the environment; each individual physician should develop a greater consciousness of the potential impact of their online actions for the entire profession.

Beyond the role of individuals, institutions have an important role to play in defining and exemplifying what might be called “online professionalism.” As yet, there are no widely accepted guidelines to assist individuals and institutions in navigating challenges and opportunities for medical professionalism while online. Even medical schools, which oversee the youngest members of the profession and the most frequent users of social media, have not universally formed policies specifically addressing this issue.4 Accordingly, we suggest that institutions—from medical schools and residencies to hospitals and group practices—should take a proactive stance in setting guidelines and standards for their members. We propose that institutional standards for “online professionalism” utilize valuable concepts such as the digital footprint and emphasize the power of social media to reflect professional values to the public. We also believe that the best way to develop institutional concepts for online professionalism is to engage various users of these technologies in a consensus-oriented dialogue that involves students, patients, educators, clinicians, and administrators. Such dialogue, especially if it is sustained over time, also has the potential to reduce the number of problems arising from the use of social media by virtue of the shared educational impact of discussing the standards for online professionalism that are agreeable to all parties involved. Indeed, emerging research with medical students and residents suggests that most feel responsibility to represent themselves professionally online, and while they oppose strict regulation of their online behavior, increased dialogue and guidance is welcomed.16,17

Go to:THE POWER OF SOCIAL MEDIA TO PROMOTE MEDICAL PROFESSIONALISM

Problematic uses of social media by physicians have garnered a great deal of public attention to date. Yet an equally important challenge for medical professionals is to use the mirror of social media positively. For example, respectful clinical narratives written by medical students that avoid disclosing any personally identifiable information about patients can promote understanding, reflection, and greater appreciation of the patient-physician relationship.18,19 Students have also used social media to improve patient safety by promoting the World Health Organization’s Surgical Checklist.20 Practicing physicians can use social networking and other Web 2.0 tools to share sound medical information and help the public interpret medical studies, thereby becoming sources of credible medical information on the Internet. Some have even argued that maintaining an online presence that is accessible and useful to patients is a must for physicians.21 Indeed, a compelling case for quality improvement through better communication via social media can be made,22 and medical professionalism encompasses a commitment to quality improvement.10 An increasing number of public health organizations, hospitals, and medical centers are using social networking applications to provide medical information to the public.23 Collectively, these interactions can serve as a counter-balance to less trustworthy sources of information as the public increasingly turns to the Internet to find health information.

If social media is a mirror, what kind of reflections does the public see of physicians? While many Internet sites offer ratings of physicians,24 and it is believed that patients already search the Internet for information about their physicians frequently,25 we do not yet know the net impact of positive and negative online behaviors on the public’s overall view of physicians’ professional values. Certainly, the principle of “first, do no harm” should apply to physicians’ use of social media, but we can do better. Just as we must look beyond harm reduction towards health promotion in clinical practice, we must go farther than curtailing unprofessional behavior online and embrace the positive potential for social media: physicians and health care organizations can and should utilize the power of social media to facilitate interactions with patients and the public that increase their confidence in the medical profession. If we fail to engage this technology constructively, we will lose an important opportunity to expand the application of medical professionalism within contemporary society. Moreover, a proactive approach on the part of physicians may strengthen our patients’ understanding of medical professionalism and provide an example of “online professionalism” for other professions to consider.


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Online Professionalism and the Mirror of Social Media  -  */S.Y\ 

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Adversity can be a catalyst for positive change

Adversity can be a catalyst for positive change | Technology Transfer for  Development. | Scoop.it

 

Pioneering new book demonstrates that rather than ruining your life, a traumatic event can often improve it.

 

ragedy, natural disasters, terrorism, divorce; 75 per cent of us will experience some form of trauma in life. But the experience can be a catalyst for positive change.

 

In a ground-breaking new book an expert from The University of Nottingham, who has spent the last twenty years working with the survivors of trauma, challenges the conventional wisdom about trauma and its aftermath and demonstrates that rather than necessarily ruining one’s life, a traumatic event can often improve it.

 

Professor Stephen Joseph, an expert in posttraumatic growth, says human beings really can find purpose and a new direction in the wake of change and adversity. His book “What Doesn’t Kill Us’ is published in February 2 2012 by Piatkus...

 

Supportive:

http://1.usa.gov/12rdFUg

http://bit.ly/11D8vPI

http://bit.ly/VaI3tY

 

Post Image: http://bit.ly/18DKMHT


Via Mhd.Shadi Khudr, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Adversity can be a catalyst for positive change. -   A Rational Mindset is Result of the Positive Critical Thinking. 
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Content Curation your secret weapon - Drive Traffic & Find New Customers

Content Curation your secret weapon - Drive Traffic & Find New Customers | Technology Transfer for  Development. | Scoop.it
Using Content Curation To Find New Customers.

 

Being an Internet marketer for many years I’ve seen the landscape change many times but one thing has stayed the same “Content is King”, when it comes to driving traffic to a website.

 

As a business owner we all want to get new customers to our websites. Many have tried blogging to drive traffic to their website and due to a shortage of hours in a day they end up dropping the blog or hiring ghost writers to develop content for the site. We now have a new player on the net and it comes in the form of Content Curation. No it will not completely eliminate business owners creating content for their website but adds a whole new area of content development for a website.

 

Over the past two years I’ve tested different content curation sites and tools and have found Scoop.it to be the leader in both innovation and traffic building potential.

 

Below are examples on how Scoop.it can drive traffic and help to show the world, yes the world that your business knows your market.

 

In this article are 3 areas that when done correctly can drive new traffic to your business or brand.

 

*** If you would like help setting up a Scoop.it traffic generator for your company. Contact Brian at 1-888-535-9139 or Email Me ideas@marketinghits.com ***

 


Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com, journeycurved, ManufacturingStories
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New  Content  Strategy  for  Investment : New  Kinds  of  Start-Ups :  Investment  to  Thought  Leader,  Funding  for  Nanotechnology .

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Intangible capital - International Financing Review

Intangible capital International Financing Review A study published by the Federal Reserve in September tied the growth of cash on corporate balance sheets to the rise of so-called intangible capital, things like intellectual property or the...

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Intangible  Capital   with  Nanotechnology .

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Tutorial for the NEW Google Hangouts/On Air - Video

Tutorial for the NEW Google Hangouts/On Air - Video | Technology Transfer for  Development. | Scoop.it

Via Jon Samuelson, Olivier Hoogmartens
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*/S.Y\ Internet beat TV, Spiral Leader make insight for Market, Money follow Content on Demand.
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The Life of a Twitter Influencer [Infographic]

The Life of a Twitter Influencer [Infographic] | Technology Transfer for  Development. | Scoop.it
How much do Twitter influencers earn per post? How many followers do you need to become an 'influencer'? See the answers to these and more in this infographic.

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New Media Symbiosis. This is the Positive Effect of Interaction in Social Media / Facebook, Twitter, Scoop.it, LinkedIn, About me, SlideShare, Viadeo, .../.
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A Push to Back Traditional Chinese Medicine With More Data

A Push to Back Traditional Chinese Medicine With More Data | Technology Transfer for  Development. | Scoop.it
Researchers marry modern analytical techniques to centuries-old theories on what makes people sick.
Via Krishan Maggon
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Traditional Chinese medicine teaches that some people have hot constitutions, making them prone to fever and inflammation in parts ... - */S.Y\  Creative Reflection determine your Capacity for Rethinking with New Mindset.
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How to Create Your Reason

How to Create Your Reason | Technology Transfer for  Development. | Scoop.it
In an economy that's going nowhere, having a "why" is more important than ever.

Via Debra Ulrich
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You must answer it in a more fundamental sense — “knowledge,” “art,” “education,” “enlightenment.” All these are better answers, in Priya’s case. They’re tiny steps beyond purpose, and towards the beginnings of a reason. - */S.Y\ What's your reason !? My reason is the tested way for Development with good resuts / New Mindset, New Health & New Business Opportunities for SME's /.

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Evolutions in Leadership

Evolutions in Leadership | Technology Transfer for  Development. | Scoop.it
Evolution is about change over generations: about adaptation to suit the prevailing environment. It's not a fast process, but it has an inevitability, and we all know what happens to the losers. Lo...

Via june holley, Emeric Nectoux
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

Evolutions in Leadership.  -  */S.Y\   The Evolution of Leader. A Permanent Creativity  give "Things of Perfection",The Real Application of They born Smart Transformation / New Understanding & Analytical Wisdom/. 

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Emotional Intelligence Part 3: How to lead through an unexpected crisis? - IntelligentHQ

Emotional Intelligence Part 3: How to lead through an unexpected crisis? - IntelligentHQ | Technology Transfer for  Development. | Scoop.it
What is an Unexpected Challenge or Crisis? Emotions vs. Rationale, Business vs. Personal First, what is a crisis? In my view, it is something opposit... (Emotional Intelligence Part 3: How to lead through an unexpected crisis?

Via Alonzo Johnson
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According to Dan Hill, ‘Emotionomics”, we need to appreciate our emotions due to their force to encourage us to act. It is not our rational mind, that forces us to act, but our emotions. Our mind produces the thought, and only then – the thought produces emotion that motivates us. - */S.Y\

Smart Tips. Many Faces of Constructivism. Look the Mirror of Thought Leader. You can see Much Creativity on Demand.

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The value of co-creation

The value of co-creation | Technology Transfer for  Development. | Scoop.it
Co-creation, where company and customer work together to create better value (and products) for the customer, has always facinated me. The first time I took part in a co-creation process was when my

Via Gabriel ( Soroush )
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

We gathered a room full of "thought leaders", got inspiring sessions on trends and technology, and then did fantastic collaborative work.   -   */S.Y\  

 A Perspective Marketing is Method of Transformation for SME's .New Products & Services for Consumers .

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Rescooped by Sergey Yatsenko from Maintenance Repair and Operations
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How To Build Conversations That Create Innovative Ideas

How To Build Conversations That Create Innovative Ideas | Technology Transfer for  Development. | Scoop.it
The best way to inspire innovative thinking isn't to force a brainstorming session, it's to create an ongoing conversation. Here's how.

Via Patrick Wallace
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

Offer structured forums for discussions. To ensure that good ideas are spotted and developed, companies create discussion frameworks, such as innovation days and challenges.  -   */S.Y\  Smart Tips. Many Faces of Constructivism. Look the Mirror of Thought Leader. You can see Much Creativity on Demand.

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Patrick Wallace's curator insight, April 13, 2015 10:28 AM

How To Build Conversations That Create Innovative Ideas
The best way to inspire innovative thinking isn't to force a brainstorming session, it's to create an ongoing conversation. Here's how.

Rescooped by Sergey Yatsenko from Middle Level Leadership
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10 Things Really Amazing Leaders Do

10 Things Really Amazing Leaders Do | Technology Transfer for  Development. | Scoop.it

Are you truly amazing or just good? See how many of these 10 traits are natural for you.


Via Patti Kinney
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

Amazing Bosses know how to integrate creativity into daily conversation and procedures so that every employee feels natural about being creative and facilitating productive creativity when interacting with others in the company.  -   */S.Y\  A Permanent Creativity is the Best Quality for Leader with New Opportunities for Business.

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Rescooped by Sergey Yatsenko from BFV Business Marketing Relationnel
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2 reasons why you need to avoid selling to friends and family?

2 reasons why you need to avoid selling to friends and family? | Technology Transfer for  Development. | Scoop.it
Our friends and family are the first people we attempt to sell to when we start a direct selling business because that is what we are taught. To me, that is so old school and this approach doesn't ...

Via chezmadeline, Bruce Vickers
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

2 reasons why you need to avoid selling to friends and family? – */S.Y\ 3 reason of selling. You must understanding your product of selling.

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Network virtualisation threatens telecom suppliers - ComputerWeekly.com

Network virtualisation threatens telecom suppliers
ComputerWeekly.com
Koopmans was previously COO of Bytemobile, a software company acquired by Citrix and used by every mobile operator in the UK.

Via Metaswitch Networks
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

Network virtualisation    for  Technology  Transfer .

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Metaswitch Networks's curator insight, May 24, 2013 12:26 PM

Just building-out our little curated paper on NFV...

Scooped by Sergey Yatsenko
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Assisted Technology Transfer: Why It’s Worth the Investment - News and Insights - KAUST TTI

Assisted Technology Transfer: Why It’s Worth the Investment - News and Insights - KAUST TTI | Technology Transfer for  Development. | Scoop.it
Across the globe, about 80% of all industrial production comes from small and medium enterprises (SMEs). In Saudi Arabia, however, only 14% does (Bowden, 2013), but this imbalance represents a tremendous opportunity.
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

Real  Paradigm  of  Innovation :  the  Needful  Mechanism  for  Technology  Transfer .

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