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#twitterchat: Why Teachers Like Learning Models

#twitterchat: Why Teachers Like Learning Models | Technology in the Science Classroom | Scoop.it

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"Recently, #cohort21 hosted a twitter chat on a topic near and dear to our hearts: learning models and frameworks.

We have our own ideas about what they’re so important, but this isn’t about us, is it?

This being 2014, the #twitterchat conversation, of course, quickly turned to SAMR and TPACK, and educators shared their favorite versions, how they used them, and what future needs in the space might be. Archived twitter chats make for wonderful quick reads, and can include some gems (the Starbucks analogy, for example), so, here you go. #twitterchat: Why Teachers Like Learning Models, all in one place."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, December 10, 2014 9:32 PM

What happens when you host a twitter chat the the topic turns to learning models and frameworks? Check out this post that takes a twitter chat that discussed this topic and then storified the discussion.

If you don't know about SAMR (check out the image above) or TPACK you may find posts in this Scoop.it on each (just type in the keyword). And you may find yourself participating in one of these twitter chats down the road!

Aileenexa's curator insight, December 12, 2014 6:02 AM

thy

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Verso - a Free Tool to Engage Student Voice

Verso - a Free Tool to Engage Student Voice | Technology in the Science Classroom | Scoop.it

"Flip learning App, scaffold effective pedagogy with this simple mobile app that works across all platforms."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, December 14, 2014 8:42 PM

Verso is a new tool that come to us from teachers in Australia. It provides teachers the ability to create a 'challenge' and provide a prompt, which may be a video, document, website, etc. Add some thought provoking questions and students may answer within Verso. Students must post their own answer before they can respond to others, and all answers are anonymous.

Verso provides a number of resources to help you get started, including:

* Getting Started - This section "shows you how to Verso in 90 seconds", providing a number of examples (and you may choose one to try with your students).

* Strategies to Support Deeper Thinking - This section is very robust, and it is worth the time to check it out. They provide nine strategies to support deeper thinking, including:

     - Ask for more than one type of response from your student

     - Be explicit about how you want your students to respond, model an answer in your instruction

     - Be provocative to promote debate amongst your students

     - Let your students answer the questions. This section has an excellent resource "Asking Googleable vs NonGoogleable Questions"

*Verso Strategies: Building Deeper Collaboration Using Google Drive

* How To - Discover a range of videos and examples to help you get started

* Example Provocations - Find a wide variety of examples that you may choose to use.

They also have a blog that provides additional resources.

Their website uses three key words: Challenge, Engage, Learn. This website will allow your students to be challenged, engaged and learn and is worth taking some time to explore.

niftyjock's curator insight, December 16, 2014 11:34 PM

cool tool

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The Untold History of Women in Science and Technology

The Untold History of Women in Science and Technology | Technology in the Science Classroom | Scoop.it
Listen to women from across the Administration tell the stories of their personal heroes across the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM).

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, December 16, 2014 9:43 PM

If you are looking for a website that looks at women who have made a difference in STEM check out this site from the White House. Women who work in the White House "tell their stories of their personal heroes across the fields of science, technology, engineering and math."

The site also suggest that we honor those women who have come before in the "best possible way: By committing to encourage a young woman to pursue a career in science."

Currently the stories of 12 women are shared. You may also write about your "untold STEM history" and share how you will inspire young women to pursue science careers.

You can listen to the stories, and they range from just under one minute to about six minutes in length.

If you would like additional short talks on women in science you consider checking out some of the programs that WAMC offered in 2009 called Women in Science on the Air. A number of these tell the stories of women who were instrumental in making changes but are not know. You can access them at this site:

http://wamc.org/term/women-science-air-0

Prof. Hankell's curator insight, December 18, 2014 9:14 PM

Lydia Villa-Komaroff is considered to be a trailblazer in the field of molecular biology...

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Growth vs Fixed Mindset For Elementary Students

Growth vs Fixed Mindset For Elementary Students | Technology in the Science Classroom | Scoop.it

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, January 2, 7:09 AM

The infographic above is geared to elementary students. Research shows that if we teach students about their brain, and about growth mindset and fixed mindset it makes a difference. Consider sharing this with your students and have them answer the questions. Some may find that they are holding themselves back based on their mindset. Students could share strategies that they use when they find themselves falling into areas of a fixed mindset.

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The 14 Best Resources on the Web for STEM Educators | Edudemic

The 14 Best Resources on the Web for STEM Educators | Edudemic | Technology in the Science Classroom | Scoop.it
It’s all over the news: STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) education ranks among the country’s most pressing needs. Countless news stories talk about the renewed national concern with educating students in the STEM fields, and policy initiatives such as Common Core push forward with new attempts to fill that gap. But just what is causing this emphasis? And what can be done to solve the problem?

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Michael MacNeil's curator insight, November 25, 2014 11:56 AM

Everyone in the world of learning, and that's all of us, can always use any resources offered.  Have them when you may need them.

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Minecraft YouTube videos have been watched 47bn times - theguardian

Minecraft YouTube videos have been watched 47bn times - theguardian | Technology in the Science Classroom | Scoop.it
Children and adults alike aren’t just playing Minecraft in their millions: they’re watching YouTube videos made using Minecraft – and those videos are racking up billions of views.

Now online video firm Octoly has published a report aiming to quantify that, claiming that by June 2014, Minecraft videos had been watched 30.8 billion times, with only 183 million of those views coming from the channel of Mojang, the game’s publisher.

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How the Internet Works Infographic (+ others)

How the Internet Works Infographic (+ others) | Technology in the Science Classroom | Scoop.it

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, October 8, 2014 10:28 PM

Do you understand how the Internet works? Can you dissect a URL? How much does a terabyte hold? These questions (and several others) are answered in a number of infographics created by Abby Ryan Design and available at this website. If you teach students about these concepts this may help many visual learners in their understanding. The infographics found here are:

* Dissecting a URL

* How the Internet Works

* The Evolution of Computers

* How much does a TB Hold?

* 7 Commandments of Computer Use

* 10 Signs Your Computer has a Virus

* Anatomy of a Ninja

Have fun exploring and sharing these with your students.

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Free Technology for Teachers: Best of the Web Fall 2014

Free Technology for Teachers: Best of the Web Fall 2014 | Technology in the Science Classroom | Scoop.it

"This afternoon at the ACTEM conference I presented an update version of my Best of the Web presentation. The slides from that presentation are embedded below."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, October 9, 2014 10:24 PM

Richard Byrne has updated his Best of the Web presentation. This version provides over 40 great websites/tools that you may want to check out. You should be able to find more information about each resource on this website also. Below are a few of the tools that may be new to you.

* Kahoot

* Canva

* Lucid Press

* Too Noisy

* JellyCam

There are many more in this post. As you watch the embedded presentation you may click on a link and go directly to the website (which opens in a new window).

Dale Borgeson's curator insight, October 20, 2014 1:16 AM

Free Technology for Teachers is a great blog for you to follow. Jeff posts new ideas and tools every day!

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The Mindset of the Maker Educator

The Mindset of the Maker Educator | Technology in the Science Classroom | Scoop.it
Here are some graphics, Thinglinks, and the slideshow I created for my Mindset of the Maker Educator Workshop:  

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, October 12, 2014 9:51 PM

If you are interested in Maker Education this post from Jackie Gerstein is worth checking out. She provides three visuals, all of which are also put in ThingLink, so each has great resources linked to the image.

The three images are:

* Educator as a Maker Educator

* Perfect Storm for Maker Education

* A Making Reflection (designed for students this could be used in a variety of ways)

There is also a slideshare The Mindset of a Maker Educator that provides links to a range of materials.

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Introduction to the SAMR Model Video | Common Sense Media

Introduction to the SAMR Model Video | Common Sense Media | Technology in the Science Classroom | Scoop.it

"Dr. Ruben Puentedura developed the SAMR model as a way for teachers to evaluate how they are incorporating technology into their instructional practice. You can use SAMR to reflect upon how you are integrating technology into your classroom."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, October 15, 2014 6:05 PM

There are many models one can look to when integrating technology into the curriculum and one that is often spoken about is SAMR. SAMR allows teachers to learn how to move from enhancing curriculum to transforming curriculum.

Think of climbing a ladder.

The bottom rung of the ladder would be substitution.

The second step would be modification.

The third step would be augmentation.

The fourth step would be redefinition.

The video takes an example and shows how it changes as it moves up the ladder.

There are also a number of reflection questions provided that may help you understand how to evaluate each of the areas and move your students to use more high order thinking skills (HOTS) as well as impact student achievement.

There are many videos available that explain SAMR. This one does an excellent job and provides some extra tips...and it in just over 4 minutes in length!

Karla Koop's curator insight, October 18, 2014 10:10 AM

Great article....

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The Science of Smart | American RadioWorks |

The Science of Smart | American RadioWorks | | Technology in the Science Classroom | Scoop.it

"Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better.

In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, October 20, 2014 7:44 PM

This radio documentary focuses on current research on how we learn. You may listen to the documentary, or you may read the transcripts. There are three programs that discuss:

* This is Your Brain on Language - This portion focuses on raising a bilingual child. It turns out that children whom are bilingual have higher executive functioning skills.

* Learning to Love Tests - That's right, we can teach students to love tests, but only if we use them correctly!

* Variation is Key to Deeper Learning - Trial and error is one way to learn, but it turns out that if you "build a level of desirable difficulty" into the learning process (and tests) students may retain more knowledge and skills.

Choose to listen to the interviews with experts in these areas, or read through the transcripts to learn more about this new research and how it may impact your teaching and your students.

diane gusa's comment, October 20, 2014 7:48 PM
your curation is the best!
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PBL- Let the Class Solve World Problems

PBL- Let the Class Solve World Problems | Technology in the Science Classroom | Scoop.it
Can kids solve real life problems that affect our world? Sure! Why not? Many of you know the 7 sterile steps to PBL. How about adding a little more to the 7 steps? Here are a few ideas about how to...

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, October 22, 2014 8:00 AM

Check out this great visual on Problem Based Learning (PBL)from Mia MacMeekin. It provides a look at the seven steps found in PBL. For each step she provides a number of ways for students to think about the specific process. What are the seven areas?

1. Start with a real life problem

2. Map it out

3. Prototype, prototype, prototype

4. Be creative

5. Think global

6. Join a challenge

7. Set goals

8. Create learning moments

Along the way she also makes some suggestions on what you should be doing as a teacher. If PBL is new to you (or your students) this would be a great visual to have your students recreate, where they may change words and add images to make it their own. Then hang it in your classroom and support them as they become experienced at problem based learning.

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Your Life on Earth - How has the Earth Changed?

Your Life on Earth - How has the Earth Changed? | Technology in the Science Classroom | Scoop.it

"How you and the world have changed since you were born. Best viewed on Chrome, Firefox and Internet Explorer 10 and above."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, October 25, 2014 10:42 PM

Check out this new site from BBC that allows you to see how the world has changed since you were born.

Learn how many times your heart has beaten.

Learn how far you have traveled through space.

Find out what species has been discovered in your lifetime and how much the sea level has raised.

This would be a great site to have students explore and then write about the changes they think are most important, or have them create an infographic that shares changes. Or you might use it to explore how fast the world is changing for a classroom discussion.

NTIC Entreprises's curator insight, October 27, 2014 6:22 AM

ajouter votre point de vue ...

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Amazing! 74 Infographics for Teacher-Librarians (L.A. Teachers Too!)

Amazing! 74 Infographics for Teacher-Librarians (L.A. Teachers Too!) | Technology in the Science Classroom | Scoop.it

"When your budget is low on dollars, you need to become creative when it comes to everything in your school library. Since we have a computer lab in our library-media center, (and lots of wall space...) I have decorated the lab with posters and infographics...There are also many posters which help students format their research paper, search for Google images, and understanding search results...."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, December 11, 2014 10:04 PM

Finding great infographics takes time. In this post Julie Greller shares 74 infographics that she says will be of interest to librarians and language arts teachers. I think that many teachers whom are in other disciplines will also find valuable resources here.

Greller provides a list of titles (for the infographics) that are hot linked. Click and off you go.

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16 Ways Your Brain Is Sabotaging Your Effort To Learn

16 Ways Your Brain Is Sabotaging Your Effort To Learn | Technology in the Science Classroom | Scoop.it

"Most of the time, it’s nothing more than an innocent effort to save face. Our brain will tell us we’re smarter and better looking than everyone else, and that any fault brought to our attention should probably be blamed on someone else..."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:48 PM

Do you know that your brain may sabotage you? This posts looks at sixteen ways the brain may set "traps" that lead us astray. Additional resources are also listed in many of these "traps."

* Equating Knowing With Learning. It takes time for us to really "learn" something, which means we need to review this new information so we can move it from short-term storage to long-term storage.

* Being Biased Towards Ourselves. If you bomb a test or assignment do you tend to base blame on others? This is one example of being biased toward ourselves. We blame the book, teacher...the list could go on.

* Making Us Think We Can Multi-task. What happens when you multi-task? Your brain is quickly switching back and forth between multiple task your brain becomes overloaded and cannot perform at full capacity.

To read more about these three items, and learn about the other 13 ways your brain may try to trick you click through to the post.

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Best Education-Related Videos of 2014

Best Education-Related Videos of 2014 | Technology in the Science Classroom | Scoop.it
I love end of year “best of” lists.  My own list is what I found to be the most powerful education related videos of 2014. They all, in some way, address the mind, heart, and spirit of education.  ...

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, December 18, 2014 9:44 PM

Finding great educational videos takes time...so I am always excited when I find a list of suggested video. Jackie Gerstein shares her top 11. They range from just over three minutes to about seventeen minutes. Below is  a list of the videos.

* Malala Yousuf Nobel Prize Speech

* Carol Dweck: The Power of Believing You Can Improve

* Sir Ken Robinson: Can Creativity Be Taught

* President Obama on the Whitehouse Maker Faire

* Toxic Culture of Education: Joshua Katz

* The necessity of the student voice | Catherine Zhang

* Rethinking Learning in the Digital Age – Mitchel Resnick

* If I Knew Then: A Letter to Me on My First Day Teaching

* Kid President Throws a Surprise Party for a Retiring Teacher

* Erzah French: Sportskid of the Year

* Malcolm Mitchell Book Club

You will find brief descriptions for most of these videos and I suspect that many will choose to watch all of them over a period of time. You may find one or two that would be great to share at a faculty meeting.

Meg Swecker's curator insight, December 19, 2014 1:03 PM

A 'must view' list of educationally related videos.

Simon Awuyo's curator insight, December 21, 2014 12:06 PM

The will to die for the child right is hyper-determination. It is not easy to pass through the valley of shadow of death but it is possible.

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School vs. Learning: Divergent or Convergent

School vs. Learning: Divergent or Convergent | Technology in the Science Classroom | Scoop.it
I have been thinking a lot about the "traditional" model of school and how people actually learn. If done the wrong way, school can actually go against what is needed for learning.  There are a lot...

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Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, December 30, 2014 8:42 AM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Lyne Leblanc's curator insight, December 30, 2014 9:06 AM

Est-ce que l'école n'a pas l'obligation de favoriser l'apprentissage de tous?

Lon Woodbury's curator insight, December 30, 2014 5:32 PM

This idea has been around a long time.  When I was an undergraduate, I had some friends state to me something along the lines of: "Now that I've finished my assignments, I can start pursuing my education."  The network of schools and programs for struggling teens started in the 1980s were based on many of these ideas, and so far as emotional growth along with academics, the emphasis was on helping the struggling students learn who they are and what they can do with it.  The motivation at that time was very much along the line of what the author calls learning.  Many of them are still doing that. -Lon

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6 Good iPad Apps to Turn Pictures Into Cartoons and Comics ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

6 Good iPad Apps to Turn Pictures Into Cartoons and Comics ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Technology in the Science Classroom | Scoop.it
I spent sometime this weekend curating and working on the list of iPad apps below. These are apps that students can use to create beautiful cartoons to use in their multimedia projects or in activities that involve comic strips, digital storytelling, presentations and many more. All of these apps are easy to use and do not require any advanced technical skill. Some of the things students can do with these apps include: take pictures and turn them into cartoons, capture cartoon videos, draw cartoon sketches, customize and add different effects to pictures, convert photos into cartoon avatars, and many more.

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Free Technology for Teachers: Six Web Adventures In Science

Free Technology for Teachers: Six Web Adventures In Science | Technology in the Science Classroom | Scoop.it

"There are six adventures in the series including the CSI adventure. Each of the adventures is appropriate for middle school or high school use. In each adventure students take on the role of scientist to solve a crime, conduct experiments, and learn about scientific methods and processes."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, November 1, 2013 9:33 PM

Richard Byrne shares six science games that are available online through Rice University. The games include:

* CSI Adventure - six adventures that allow students to become forensic scientists and solve a crime.

* Cool Science Careers - students may explore five STEM-based careers. Students take an interest survey and their adventure will be guided by their interests.

* MedMyst - learn about microbiology with a focus on infectious diseases and how they spread.

* Reconstructors allows you to "gather evidence and data to solve drug-related cases." (3 games)

* Virtual Clinical Trials - become a research scientist and help develope treatments for spinal cord injuries, depression and brain injuries.

* N-Squad - "investigate the effects of alcohol on the digestive, circulatory, and nervous systems."

These games are geared to middle and high school students and these adventures are also available in Spanish!

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10 Resources to Better Understand Dyslexia | Edudemic

10 Resources to Better Understand Dyslexia | Edudemic | Technology in the Science Classroom | Scoop.it
Imagine trying to read a sentence when every other word looks like made-up gibberish. It’s exhausting to read the sentence over and over again, trying to put together the meaning. That one troublesome sentence is followed by another… and another… and another… You know it’s not your fault – it’s the text doesn’t make sense. …

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, October 9, 2014 10:05 PM

Did you know that it is estimated that 1 out of 5 people struggle with dyslexia (and often do not realize it)? This post provides a range of resources that look at dyslexia. The resources are grouped in four areas:

* Understanding Dsylexia

* Identifying Dyslexia

* How to Teach Dyslexic Students

* Personalizing Dyslexia

The resources include videos and articles/posts as well as a link to a great website at Yale. And if you have a student in your class how is dyslexic they might be interested in learning that the following people were also dyslexic: Albert Einstein, Steven Jobs, Walt Disney, Tom Cruise and Steven Spielberg were also dyslexic.

Western Nutrition News's curator insight, October 10, 2014 6:37 AM

very worthwhile!  Did you know that th earliest sign of dyslexia is difficulty telling right from left?  and that the kids will blithely interchange hands, not even knowing that they're doing it?

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Crafting Questions That Drive Projects

Crafting Questions That Drive Projects | Technology in the Science Classroom | Scoop.it

"Not only does project based learning motivate students because it is an authentic use of technology, it facilitates active learning, critical thinking, collaboration, and creativity. Projects begin with a driving question–an open-ended question that sets the stage for the project by creating interest and curiosity."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, October 10, 2014 10:32 PM

This post by Tony Vincent provides an in-depth look at how to craft driving questions that promote project based learning. It begins with a discussion of why you would choose to use driving questions and then turns to projects and shares what he believes makes a good project, one that will make a "dent" in the world.

Additional areas explored include:

* What comes first,the driving question or the learning goals?

* Who writes the question?

* The many types of driving questions (and the list includes seven categories) as well as resources that will help you craft a driving question.

* Refining the question

* Outcomes

* Branching questions

There are quite a few examples of driving questions provided as well as links to some additional resources.

If you are planning on having project based learning a component of your classroom this post provides great foundational material to help you create a great driving question.

Linda Ashida's curator insight, October 11, 2014 10:20 AM

This is a great post.  Key ideas to use driving questions, tap into student passion and inspire meaningful learning.

Lisa Norris's curator insight, October 12, 2014 1:24 PM

Grabbing their attention in the beginning with great questions will give them the stamina to grapple with the inquiry process later.

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5 Great Online Tools for Creating Infographics

5 Great Online Tools for  Creating Infographics | Technology in the Science Classroom | Scoop.it
Professional infographic designers rely primarily on a core vector graphics software program to cr...

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, October 13, 2014 10:00 PM

Here is an up-to-date review of five tools that allow you to create infographics. Each tool is described. There is a list of pros and cons for each tool. All have free versions available, and some have more robust versions that cost additional money.

The five tools that are discussed are:

* Visme

* Canva

* Easel.ly

* Piktochart

* Infogr.am

Providing opportunities for students to create infographics allows them to create graphs, use a different style of writing, and have some fun while showing that they understand key concepts and ideas.

Allison Kenney's curator insight, October 14, 2014 5:06 PM

Who doesn't need these tools?

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Seeing Is Believing: Visual vs. Linear Content

Seeing Is Believing: Visual vs. Linear Content | Technology in the Science Classroom | Scoop.it

"In order for our learners to see how designing information changes how it is viewed, the students this year placed their visual infographics side-by-side with their linear notes to see the transformation. It was the “ah ha” moment, when they could examine how the delivery of content mattered and how the deliberate choices in font hierarchy, color selection, and placement changed the way others perceived the ideas."


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Paul Macmullen's curator insight, October 21, 2014 6:32 PM

Useful reference for a graphically challenges creature of language such as myself :-)

 

Chris Carter's curator insight, October 21, 2014 9:47 PM

Seeing really is believing.

WhoIsAbishag's curator insight, November 2, 2014 9:32 PM

NLP Strategies.

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How do germs spread (and why do they make us sick)?

How do germs spread (and why do they make us sick)? | Technology in the Science Classroom | Scoop.it

"Germs are found on almost every surface we come in contact with, which makes it incredibly common for our bodies to be exposed to them. But why are some of these germs relatively harmless, while others can be fatal? Yannay Khaikan and Nicole Mideo explore this question by examining germs’ varying modes of transmission."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, October 21, 2014 8:18 PM

As flu season approaches teaching students about germs is something we try to do in many classrooms. To make it a bit more understandable this TED-Ed video provides a look just how germs may spread. The language is appropriate for a range of grades (as terms are also explained).

And as all TED-Ed videos you will find a list of additional resources as well as a quiz and a discussion questions.

Kathy Lynch's curator insight, November 2, 2014 11:54 AM

Thx Beth Dichter

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The ABCs Of Sticky Teaching

The ABCs Of Sticky Teaching | Technology in the Science Classroom | Scoop.it

“Sticky Teaching”–interesting idea. Learning that lingers. Chris Lema gets at that idea in the following presentation, along with a basic explanation of why this idea works by focusing on the patterns that brains “can’t ignore.” Cool approach, so we’ve taken the six strategies, and given an example for each.


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, October 22, 2014 9:50 PM

Sticky teaching looks at "understanding what the brain can't ignore." In this post there is an explanation of six strategies of sticky teaching.

1. Awaken the intrigue.

2. Begin and end often.

3. Create lots of contrast.

4. Draw them in with stories.

5. Emotion draws attention.

6. Focus on the big idea.

Each of these ideas is discussed in the post.

There is also an embedded slideshare in the post. It provides some interesting statistics and explains why each of these strategies work.

Kathy Lynch's curator insight, November 2, 2014 11:52 AM

Thx Beth Dichter!